Federal Correctional Institution, Three Rivers

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Federal Correctional Institution, Three Rivers
ThreeRiversNewBOPimage.jpg
Location Live Oak County,
near Three Rivers, Texas
Status Operational
Security class Medium-security (with minimum-security prison camp)
Population 1,180 (360 in prison camp)
Managed by Federal Bureau of Prisons
Warden Ralph Hanson

The Federal Correctional Institution, Three Rivers (FCI Three Rivers) is a medium-security United States federal prison for male inmates in Texas. It is operated by Federal Bureau of Prisons, a division of the United States Department of Justice. The facility also has an adjacent satellite prison camp which houses minimum-security male offenders.

FCI Three Rivers is approximately 80 miles south of San Antonio and 73 miles northwest of Corpus Christi.[1]

Notable incidents[edit]

Entrance

In 2008, a riot occurred between members of rival prison gangs at FCI Three Rivers which left 22 prisoners injured and one dead. Fifteen of the injured were transported to hospitals in Corpus Christi and San Antonio. The deceased inmate was identified as 40-year-old Servando Rodriguez of Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, Mexico. Sources at the prison told the San Antonio Express-News that one gang consisted of American-born Chicanos and the other of Mexican citizens known as "Paisas."[2]

A former U.S. Bureau of Prisons correctional officer and his wife were sentenced Wednesday to federal prison for accepting bribes from the family of an inmate in exchange for taking contraband into the Federal Correction Institution in Three Rivers.

According to the Department of Justice, Joel Gonzalez admitted that from December 2012 through April 2014 he made plans to smuggle tobacco and other contraband into the FCI in exchange for cash.

His wife, Lisa Gonzalez, reportedly assisted him by arranging times and locations for receiving the contraband and the bribe payments. The DOJ said Lisa Gonzalez, who was employed by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice during the scheme, traveled with her husband to Laredo to accept the items. Joel Gonzalez would then smuggle them into the FCI on his body, the DOJ said.

Joel Gonzalez was sentenced to 24 months in prison, while his wife was ordered to serve 10 months. The couple was also ordered to serve three years of supervised release following completion of their prison sentences.[3]

Notable inmates (current and former)[edit]

Inmate Name Register Number Status Details
Barrett Brown 45047-177 Serving a 63-month sentence; released May 25, 2017.[4] Journalist associated with the computer hacking group Anonymous and founder of Project PM, an unofficial watchdog for the surveillance industry; pleaded guilty in 2014 to posting a video threatening an FBI Agent and disclosing details regarding an upcoming search warrant execution.[5][6][7]
Russell DeBusk 25730-001 Transferred to state prison in 2012 after serving 5 years.[8] Former student at Birmingham-Southern College; pleaded guilty in 2006 to conspiring to commit civil rights violations and arson in connection with setting fires at nine black churches in Alabama in 2006; two accomplices were also sentenced to prison.[9][10]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "FCI Three Rivers". Federal Bureau of Prisons. 
  2. ^ Contreras, Guillermo, Robert Crowe, and Sara Ines Calderon. "Gang riot at Three Rivers prison leaves inmate dead." San Antonio Express-News at the Houston Chronicle. March 28, 2008. Retrieved on December 12, 2010.
  3. ^ [1][dead link]
  4. ^ "Barrett Brown". Denver Anarchist Black Cross. October 5, 2015. Retrieved 21 October 2015. 
  5. ^ Zetter, Kim (2015-01-22). "Barrett Brown Sentenced to 5 Years in Prison in Connection to Stratfor Hack". www.wired.com. Retrieved 2015-04-25. 
  6. ^ Woolf, Nicky (January 22, 2015). "Barrett Brown sentenced to 63 months for 'merely linking to hacked material'". Guardian News & Media. Retrieved 21 October 2015. 
  7. ^ "Dallas Man Associated With Anonymous Hacking Group Pleads Guilty To Federal Charges". The United States Department of Justice. US Department of Justice. April 29, 2014. Retrieved 21 October 2015. 
  8. ^ Garrison, Greg (April 13, 2012). "Church arsonist Russell Lee DeBusk Jr. released from federal prison, still must serve Alabama time". Alabama Media Group. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  9. ^ Associated Press (March 10, 2006). "Drinking may have fueled Ala. church fires". USA Today. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 
  10. ^ US Department of Justice (December 21, 2006). "Three Men Plead Guilty in Arson of Nine Alabama Churches". PRS Newswire. Retrieved 27 October 2013. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 28°26′39″N 98°19′29″W / 28.44417°N 98.32472°W / 28.44417; -98.32472