List of Soviet Union military equipment of World War II

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

The following is a list of Soviet military equipment of World War II which includes artillery, vehicles and vessels. World War II was the deadliest war in history which started in 1939 and ended in 1945. Following political instability built-up in Europe from 1930, Germany, which aimed to dominate Europe, attacked Poland on the 1st of September 1939, marking the start of World War II. The USSR (Soviet Union) joined the attack on Poland from 17th September 1939. The war in Europe ended on 8th May 1945 with the capitulation of Germany to the allied (including Soviet) forces.

Knife[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
NR-40 Knife  Soviet Union
Knife nr40 ussr.jpg
Soviet combat knife that was produced after the Winter War in 1940.

Small arms[edit]

Pistols (manual and semi-automatic)[edit]

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
Nagant M1895 Revolver 7.62×38mmR Russian Empire Nagant M1894.JPG 7-round cylinder.
Tokarev TT-33 Semi-automatic pistol 7.62×25mm Tokarev  Soviet Union Tokarev TT33 (6825679152).jpg 8-round magazine. Widely used by officers, did not fully replace the Nagant M1895.
M1911A1 Semi-automatic pistol .45 ACP  United States
M1911A1.png
7-round magazine. Supplied by the United States during the Lend-Lease program.
Mauser C96 Semi-automatic pistol 7.63×25mm Mauser German Empire Mauser C96 7,63 (6971794467).jpg 10-round internal magazine. Small amount captured from German forces.

Rifles, sniper rifles and battle rifles[edit]

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
Mosin–Nagant M1891/30 Bolt-action rifle / Sniper rifle (with 3.5× PU scope attached) 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union Mosin nagant m9130 from cia.jpeg 5-round internal magazine. Most widely used bolt-action rifle by the Red Army.
Mosin–Nagant M1938 Carbine Bolt-action rifle 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union Mosin-Nagant karbin m1938 Ryssland - AM.032891.jpg 5-round internal magazine.
Mosin–Nagant M1944 Carbine Bolt-action rifle 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union M44 Mosin.JPG 5-round internal magazine.
Tokarev SVT-38 Semi-automatic rifle 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union SVT-38 - Ryssland - AM.045576.jpg 10-round magazine.
Tokarev SVT-40 Semi-automatic rifle / Sniper rifle (with 3.5× PU scope attached) 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union SVT-40 - Ryssland - AM.032865.jpg 10-round magazine. Most widely used semi-automatic rifle by the Red Army.
Federov Avtomat Battle rifle 6.5×50mmSR Arisaka Russian Empire Avtomat Fedorov.png 25-round magazine. Deployed during the Winter War from stockpiles due to a shortage of submachine guns.[1]
Simonov AVS-36 Battle rifle 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union AVS-36 - Ryssland - AM.123596.jpg 15-round magazine. Produced from 1934-1940, it was mostly withdrawn in 1941 due to issues. Used primarily during the Winter War.
Tokarev AVT-40 Battle rifle 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union SVT-40 - Ryssland - AM.032865.jpg 10-round magazine. Modified SVT-40 with a different firing selector. Produced from May 1942 until halted in the summer of 1943 due to mostly uncontrollable automatic fire and breakage.

Submachine guns[edit]

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
PPD-34 Submachine gun 7.62×25mm Tokarev  Soviet Union PPD-34.JPG 25-round magazine. Based and adapted from the Suomi KP/-31, was not produced in larger quantities until 1937-1939.
PPD-34/38 / PPD-40 Submachine gun 7.62×25mm Tokarev  Soviet Union PPD-34-38 SMG.JPG 71-round magazine.
PPSh-41 Submachine gun 7.62×25mm Tokarev  Soviet Union PPSh-41 from soviet.jpg 35, 71-round magazine. Most widely used Soviet submachine gun.
PPS-42 / PPS-43 Submachine gun 7.62×25mm Tokarev  Soviet Union PPS-43 Soviet 7.62 mm submachine gun.jpg 35-round magazine.
Thompson M1928A1 Submachine gun 11.43×23mm (.45 ACP)  United States Submachine gun M1928 Thompson.jpg 20, 30, 50-round magazine. Supplied by the United States during the Lend-Lease program.
M50 Reising Submachine gun .45 ACP  United States Model-50.jpg 12, 30-round magazine. Supplied by the United States during the Lend-Lease program.

Machine guns[edit]

Name Type Cartridge Origin Photo Notes
DP-27 / DP-28 Light machine gun 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union Deactivated DP-27SKh at ARMS & Hunting 2015.jpg 47-round magazine. Most widely used light machine gun by the Red Army.
DS-39 Medium machine gun 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union Degtyaryov DS-39 machine gun in Tula State Arms Museum - 2016 01.jpg 250-round belt.
SG-43 Gorunov Medium machine gun 7.62×54mmR  Soviet Union SG-43 Goryunov machine gun in Tula State Arms Museum - 2016 01.jpg 200, 250-round belt.
PM M1910 Heavy machine gun 7.62×54mmR Russian Empire Музей истории донецкой милиции 062.jpg 250-round belt.
DShK 1938 Heavy machine gun 12.7×108mm  Soviet Union Kiev ukraine 966 army museum (18) (5869956228).jpg 50-round belt.

Explosives, hand-held anti-tank and incendiary weapons[edit]

Grenades and grenade launchers[edit]

Name Type Diameter Origin Photo Notes
Model 1914 grenade Fragmentation grenade 45mm Russian Empire
Russian hand grenade model 1914.JPG
Limited usage during World War II.
F1 grenade Fragmentation grenade 55mm Russian Empire F1 grenade travmatik com 01 by-sa.jpg Widely produced grenade. Nicknamed the "limonka" (lemon).
RG-41 Fragmentation grenade 55mm  Soviet Union
RG-41.png
5 meter kill radius.
RG-42 Fragmentation grenade 54mm  Soviet Union
RG-42 grenade Navy.jpg
Produced in 1942 to replace the complex RGD-33. Soviet partisans made copies of it when they were located behind enemy lines.
RGD-33 grenade Fragmentation grenade 45mm, 54mm (with fragmentation sleeve)  Soviet Union
Soviet RGD-33 hand grenade with fragmentation jacket.jpg
10-15 meter kill radius.
RPG-40 / RPG-41 Anti-tank grenade 20 cm  Soviet Union
Soviet RPG-40 anti-tank grenade.JPG
Effective against tanks up to 20mm of armour.
RPG-43 Anti-tank grenade 95mm  Soviet Union
РПГ--43.svg
Improved version of the RPG-40. Effective against tanks up to 75mm of armour.
RPG-6 Anti-tank grenade 103mm  Soviet Union Improved version of the RPG-43. Effective against tanks up to 100mm of armour.
Dyakonov grenade launcher Grenade launcher 40.5mm  Soviet Union
Rifle grenade launcher Mosin-Nagant 2.JPG
Grenade launcher attachment for Mosin-Nagant rifle. There were four other versions of the grenade besides the main high explosive one.

Mines[edit]

Name Type Detonation Origin Photo Notes
TM-35 mine Anti-tank mine Pressure  Soviet Union Soviet TM-35 mine at the Museum on Sapun Mountain in Sevastopol.jpg 2.8 kg of TNT.
TM-41 mine Anti-tank mine Pressure  Soviet Union TM-41 2 (ORDATA).jpg 3.9 kg of Amatol or TNT, short cylinder with the entire top surface being used as a pressure plate.
TM-44 mine Anti-tank mine Pressure  Soviet Union TM-41 4 (ORDATA).jpg 5.4 kg of Amatol, broadly similar to the earlier, smaller, TM-41 mine.
TMD-40 mine Anti-tank mine Pressure  Soviet Union 3.6 kg of Amatol.
TMD-44 / TMD-B mines Anti-tank mine Pressure  Soviet Union TMD-B Antitank mine.jpg 9-9.7 kg of Amatol.

Recoilless rifles[edit]

Name Type Calibre Origin Photo Notes
76 K/DRP Recoilless rifle 76mm  Soviet Union 76mm DRP recoilless gun.JPG Used during the Winter War. It was designed by L.V. Kurchevsky in 1930 and entered service in 1932. It was able to be mounted on GAZ-A trucks, becoming SU-4 self-propelled guns.[2]

Infantry anti-tank rifles and rocket launchers[edit]

Name Type Calibre Origin Photo Notes
PTRD-41 Anti-tank rifle 14.5×114mm  Soviet Union PTRD rifle at Great Patriotic War museum in Smolensk.jpg Single-shot reloadable rifle.
PTRS-41 Anti-tank rifle 14.5×114mm  Soviet Union PTRS 41.jpg 5-round internal magazine.
M1 Bazooka Recoilless anti-tank rocket launcher ~8 cm  United States Bazookasmithsonian.jpg Single-shot reloadable launcher. Small amounts supplied by the United States during the Lend-Lease program.
PIAT Anti-tank projectile launcher 83mm  United Kingdom PIAT cropped.jpg Single-shot reloadable launcher. Supplied by the British Empire during the Lend-Lease program.
Panzerschreck Anti-tank rocket launcher 88mm Nazi Germany Nazi Germany 1668 - Salzburg - Festung Hohensalzburg - Panzerschreck und Panzerfaust.JPG Single-shot reloadable launcher. Captured from German forces.
Panzerfaust Anti-tank recoilless gun 149mm Nazi Germany Nazi Germany Panzerfaust Mikkeli.JPG Single-shot disposable launcher. Some were captured in 1944, while many were captured in 1945 from retreating German soldiers and Volkssturm.

Flamethrowers and anti-tank incendiaries[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
FOG-2 Flamethrower  Soviet Union From 1941, around 15,000 were produced and used during World War 2.
ROKS-2 / ROKS-3 Flamethrower  Soviet Union ROKS-2 flamethrower.JPG Produced from 1935-1945. Used also during the Soviet-Finnish War (1941—1944).
Molotov cocktail Improvised incendiary bottle  Soviet Union
Molotovin cocktail.jpg
Improvised incendiary bottles that were thrown at armoured vehicles. First widely used by Finnish troops against the Soviets during the Winter War.
Ampulomyot Incendiary anti-tank ampulla-thrower  Soviet Union 125 mm ampoule thrower finnish army test.jpg 125mm incendiary spherical glass projectile. Use of it was limited in 1941, and became obsolete by 1942.
Zuckermann's bottle-thrower Incendiary anti-tank bottle launcher  Soviet Union Attachment for Mosin-Nagant rifles. Special bottles with incendiary mixtures were used. The bottles were produced in 1942, but became obsolete once Red Army troops were equipped with more anti-tank guns and rifles.

Artillery[edit]

Light and heavy infantry mortars[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
RM-38 50mm Infantry mortar  Soviet Union
50mm Company Mortar M1938 (RM-38).jpg
Light infantry mortar.
82-BM-37 82mm Infantry mortar  Soviet Union
Zagan 82 mm moździerz wz 37.jpg
Light infantry mortar.
M1938 mortar 120mm Heavy mortar  Soviet Union
2009-11-22-seelower-hoehen-by-Ralf-10.jpg
Heavy infantry mortar.
107mm M1938 mortar 107mm Infantry mortar  Soviet Union
107 mm mozdzierz wz 38 tyl.jpg
It was a lighter version of the M1938 mortar made for Soviet mountain troops.

Rocket launchers[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
BM-13 "Katyusha" 132mm Multiple rocket launcher  Soviet Union Katjuscha 1938 Moscow.jpg Most widely used multiple rocket launcher by the Red Army. It became known as "Stalin's organ" by German soldiers.
BM-8 82mm Multiple rocket launcher  Soviet Union
BM-13&ZIS-6 BM-8-24&T-40&T-60.JPG
Smaller rocket launchers that were mounted on T-40 and T-60 light tanks.
BM-31 "Andryusha" 300mm Multiple rocket launcher  Soviet Union BM-31-12 on ZIS-12 chassis at the Museum on Sapun Mountain Sevastopol 4.jpg Heavy rocket launcher with 12 rocket tubes which used the chassis of a ZIS-12 and the American Lend-Lease Studebaker US6 U3 truck.

Vehicular guns[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
45mm 20-K tank gun 45mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union 45mm M1932 parola 1.jpg Many tanks and other armoured vehicles later used it as their main armament.
57mm ZiS-4 tank gun 57mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union Zis2 nn.jpg
76.2 mm L-10 tank gun 76mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union T28 parola 4.jpg The main armament of the T-28 tank.
L-11 76.2 mm tank gun 76mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union T-34 Model 1940.jpg The main armament of the T-34 Model 1940 tank.
F-32 tank gun 76mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union KV1 1940 (23807458629).jpg The main armament of the KV-1 Model 1940 tank.
F-34 tank gun 76mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union T-34-76 RB6.JPG The main armament of T-34-76 and KV-1 tanks.
D-10 tank gun 100mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union Su-100 spatg.jpg The main armament of the SU-100 tank destroyer.

Field artillery[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
76 mm divisional gun M1902/30 76mm Field gun  Soviet Union 45mm M1932 parola 1.jpg
76 mm divisional gun M1936 (F-22 76mm Field gun  Soviet Union F22 helsinki military museum 1.jpg Used during the Winter War.
76 mm divisional gun M1939 (F-22 USV) 76mm Field gun  Soviet Union 76mm m1936 F22 gun Hameenlinna 1.jpg
76 mm divisional gun M1942 (ZiS-3) 76mm Field gun  Soviet Union 76 mm divisional gun M1942 (ZiS-3) 001.jpg
76 mm mountain gun M1938 76mm Mountain gun  Soviet Union 76mm mountain gun m1938 hameenlinna 1.jpg
76 mm regimental gun M1927 76mm Infantry support gun  Soviet Union Regimental gun 76mm 1927 front.jpg
76 mm regimental gun M1943 76mm Infantry support gun  Soviet Union OB-25 Moscow2.jpg
76 mm mountain gun M1909 76mm Mountain gun  France 76-mm mountain cannon model 1909 Schneider system 2.jpg It became obsolete after it was replaced with several other mountain guns.
100 mm field gun M1944 (BS-3) 100mm Field gun / Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union Yad-Mordechai-battlefield-BS-3-1.jpg
107 mm divisional gun M1940 (M-60) 107mm Field gun  Soviet Union M60 Saint Petersburg 1а.jpg
107 mm gun M1910/30 107mm Field gun  Soviet Union 107mm gun 1930.JPG
122 mm gun M1931 (A-19) 122mm Field gun  Soviet Union 122mm m1931 gun hameenlinna 1.jpg
122 mm gun M1931/37 (A-19) 122mm Field gun  Soviet Union 122 mm gun (A-19) displayed at the Museum of Heroic Defense and Liberation of Sevastopol on Sapun Mountain.JPG
122 mm howitzer M1909/37 122mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union 122mm model 09 37 hameenlinna 1.jpg
122 mm howitzer M1910/30 122mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union 122mm model 10 30 helsinki 1.jpg
122 mm howitzer M1938 (M-30) 122mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union VDVHistorymuseum-21.jpg
152 mm gun M1910/34 152mm Field gun  Soviet Union 152mm m1910-34.jpg
152 mm gun M1935 (Br-2) 152mm Heavy gun  Soviet Union 152mm m1935 gun 02.jpg It was used by the Red Army in the Battle of Kursk and Battle of the Seelow Heights.
152 mm howitzer M1909/30 152mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union 152mm m09-30 fortress howitzer schneider 01.jpg Most numerously used 152mm howitzer by the Red Army.
152 mm howitzer M1910/37 152mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union 152mm m10 schneider polevaja 1.jpg
152 mm howitzer M1938 (M-10) 152mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union M10 hameenlinna 2.jpg
152 mm howitzer M1943 (D-1) 152mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union D1 howitzer kiev.jpg
152 mm howitzer-gun M1937 (ML-20) 152mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union Smolensk-War-Museum-39.jpg

Fortress and siege guns[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
152 mm gun M1910/30 152mm Field howitzer  Soviet Union 152mm m1930 hameenlinna 1.jpg
203 mm howitzer M1931 (B-4) 203mm Heavy howitzer  Soviet Union Belarus-Minsk-Museum of GPW Exhibition-2.jpg It was used by the Red Army in the Battle of Berlin.
210 mm gun M1939 (Br-17) 210mm Heavy howitzer  Soviet Union
Br-17 gun.jpg
305 mm howitzer M1939 (Br-18) 210mm Heavy howitzer  Soviet Union Br-17 and br-18.jpg

Anti-tank guns[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
37 mm anti-tank gun M1930 (1-K) 37mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union 37mm m1930 (1-K) gun.jpg The gun was closely related to the German PaK 35/36.
45 mm anti-tank gun M1932 (19-K) 45mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union 45mm M1932 parola 1.jpg
45 mm anti-tank gun M1937 (53-K) 45mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union Anti-tank gun 45mm m1937 parola 1.jpg
45 mm anti-tank gun M1942 (M-42) 45mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union 45 mm anti-tank gun M1942 (M-42) Museum on Sapun Mountain Sevastopol 1.jpg
57 mm anti-tank gun M1943 (ZiS-2) 57mm Anti-tank gun  Soviet Union Zis2 nn.jpg
100 mm field gun M1944 (BS-3) 100mm Anti-tank gun / Field gun  Soviet Union Yad-Mordechai-battlefield-BS-3-1.jpg

Ground-based anti-aircraft weapons[edit]

Light anti-aircraft guns[edit]

Name Type Calibre Origin Photo Notes
DShK 1938 Heavy machine gun 12.7×108mm  Soviet Union Doushka desert.jpg 50-round belt.
25 mm automatic air defense gun M1940 (72-K) Air-defence gun 25x218mmSR  Soviet Union 72-K.jpg
37 mm automatic air defense gun M1939 (61-K) Air-defence gun 37×250mmR  Soviet Union 61-K.jpg 200-rounds.
45 mm anti-aircraft gun (21-K) Semi-automatic air-defence gun 45×386mmSR  Soviet Union 45 mm 21-K anti-aircraft gun Lennusadam 1.JPG It was used by the Soviet Navy for most of their ships from 1934 as its primary light anti-aircraft gun until replaced by the fully automatic 37 mm 70-K gun from 1942 to 1943.
37 mm 70-K gun Automatic air-defence gun 37×250mmR  Soviet Union 37-мм автоматическая зенитная пушка обр. 1939 года (1).jpg Naval version of 37mm M1939 (61-K).

Heavy anti-aircraft guns[edit]

Name Type Calibre Origin Photo Notes
76 mm air defense gun M1938 Semi-automatic air-defence gun 76.2×558mmR  Soviet Union Пушка 13.jpg
85 mm air defense gun M1939 (52-K) Semi-automatic air-defence gun 85×558mmR  Soviet Union 52-К.JPG It was successfully used against level bombers and medium/high altitude targets.

Soviet vehicles[edit]

Tankettes[edit]

Name Type Origin Quantity Photo Notes
T-27 Tankette  Soviet Union 2,157 (1941) T-27 tank.jpg The main armament was the 7.62mm DT light machine gun. Some were captured by Romanian forces.

Tanks[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
T-18 (MS-1) Light tank  Soviet Union MS-1.jpg Based on the French Renault FT tank.
T-26 Light tank  Soviet Union Т-26 музей 2.jpg Interwar period light tank that became the most numerous tank during the German invasion.
T-37A Amphibious light tank  Soviet Union T-37A ‘2’ - Patriot Museum, Kubinka (26645904419).jpg
T-38 Amphibious light tank  Soviet Union T-38 tank.JPG
T-40 Amphibious scout tank  Soviet Union T40kub1.jpg
T-30 Light tank  Soviet Union T30kub1.jpg
T-50 Light infantry tank  Soviet Union 0452 - Moskau 2015 - Panzermuseum Kubinka (25794943734).jpg
T-60 Light scout tank  Soviet Union T-60 ‘A - 2317’ - Patriot Museum, Kubinka (24524755458).jpg Replacement of the obsolete T-38 and T-30 tanks.
T-70 Light tank  Soviet Union T-70, technical museum, Togliatti-1.jpg
BT-2 Light cavalry tank  Soviet Union Bt2.jpg
BT-5 Light cavalry tank  Soviet Union Spanish BT-5.jpg
BT-7 Light cavalry tank  Soviet Union BT - 5.jpg
T-24 Medium tank  Soviet Union T-24 tank.jpg
T-28 Medium tank  Soviet Union T28 parola 1.jpg
T-34-76 Medium tank  Soviet Union T34 Munster.jpg One of the most widely used tanks in the Red Army. 35,120 were produced.
T-34-85 Medium tank  Soviet Union T-34-85 góra RB.jpg It was the most influential and produced tank in World War 2. 48,950 were produced.
T-44 Medium tank  Soviet Union T-44 left front.jpg
T-35 Heavy tank  Soviet Union P68l.jpg During the war, they were slow and proved to be mechanically unreliable. 61 were produced.
SMK Heavy tank prototype  Soviet Union Char-Sergei-Mironovitch-Kirov.jpg Only one was produced, it was used during the Winter War. It was replaced by the KV tank series.
T-100 Heavy tank prototype  Soviet Union T-100.jpg Two were produced. There were unsuccessful trial uses of it during the Winter War. It was replaced by the KV tank series.
KV-1 Heavy tank  Soviet Union КВ-1 у диорамы «Прорыв блокады Ленинграда». Вид спереди-справа.JPG Known for its strong armour, it became known as the "Russischer Koloss" – "Russian Colossus" by the German Army.
KV-2 Heavy tank / Assault gun  Soviet Union Кв-2 3.jpg The main armament was the 152mm howitzer.
KV-85 Heavy tank  Soviet Union KV-85 left side view.JPG It became the basis for the IS tanks.
IS-1 Heavy tank  Soviet Union IS 1 prototyp.jpg The IS series was a successor to the KV tank series. IS-1 was a prototype version, which had 130 produced.
IS-2 Heavy tank  Soviet Union IS-2 Cubinka 1.jpg 3,854 IS-2s were produced.
IS-3 Heavy tank  Soviet Union IS3.jpg 2,311 IS-3s were produced.

Tank-based self-propelled guns[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
SU-5-1 / SU-5-2 / SU-5-3 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union Self-propelled gun SU-5-1.jpg A self-propelled gun that was on the T-26 light tank chassis. SU-5-1 was armed with the 76.2mm divisional gun mod. 1902/30. SU-5-2 was armed with the 122mm howitzer mod. 1910/30.
SU-5-3 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union SU5-2.jpg It was on the T-26 chassis. Equipped with the 152mm mortar M1931.
SU-14 Self-propelled gun prototype  Soviet Union Prototype of SU-14 in trial, 1934.jpg One was built as a prototype. The main armament was the 152 mm gun (U-30 or BR-2).
SU-100Y Self-propelled gun prototype  Soviet Union САУ СУ-100-Y.jpg One prototype was made, based on the SU-100 tank and was used during the Winter War. The main armament was the 130mm Naval Gun B-13.
SU-26 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union СУ-26.jpg Equipped with a 76 mm regimental gun M1927.
SU-76 / SU-76M Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union Su76 nn.jpg The second most produced Soviet vehicle of World War 2, after the T-34. Equipped with a 76 mm ZIS-3Sh gun.
SU-85 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union SU-85 tank destroyer at the Muzeum Polskiej Techniki Wojskowej in Warsaw.jpg
SU-100 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union Self-propelled artillery in Brest Fortress.jpg
SU-122 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union SU-122 TBiU 8.jpg
SU-152 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-154-1964-28, Russland, russischer Panzer.jpg
ISU-122 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union ISU-122 skos RB.jpg
ISU-152 Self-propelled gun  Soviet Union Isu152 Kubinka.jpg

Light anti-tank self-propelled guns[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
SU-4 Wheeled self-propelled anti-tank gun  Soviet Union SU-4 01.jpg On the chassis of an extended GAZ-A. It was equipped with a 76 K/DRP recoilless gun.
SU-12 Wheeled self-propelled anti-tank gun  Soviet Union ГАЗ-ААА во Владивостоке ф1.JPG On the chassis of a GAZ-AAA. It was equipped with a 76 mm regimental gun M1927.

Tracked anti-aircraft guns[edit]

Name Type Calibre Origin Photo Notes
SU-11 Self-propelled air-defence gun 37×250mmR  Soviet Union ЗСУ СУ-11.jpg It was equipped with the 37mm automatic air defence gun (61-К).
ZSU-37 Self-propelled air-defence gun 37×250mmR  Soviet Union Zsu-37.jpg It was equipped with the 37mm automatic air defence gun (61-К).

Armoured cars[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
BA-27 Armoured car  Soviet Union BA-27M in the Kubinka Museum.jpg First Soviet series-produced armoured car. The main armament was the 37mm Puteaux SA 18. Some were captured during the German invasion of the Soviet Union.
D-8 Armoured car  Soviet Union D-8 Armored Car.jpg The main armament was two 7.62 DT light machine guns. It was used during the Winter War.
FAI Armoured car  Soviet Union Verkhnyaya Pyshma Tank Museum 2015 014.jpg Replacement for the D-8 armoured car. The main armament was the 7.62 DT light machine gun.
BA-I Armoured car  Soviet Union Its main armament was the 37mm 7K gun. The design of the BA-I started a series of heavy armoured cars of Izhorsky plant. These included: BA-3, BA-6, BA-9, and BA-10.
BA-3 Armoured car  Soviet Union BA-3 soviet armoured car.jpg The main armament was the 45mm gun 20-K.
BA-6 Armoured car  Soviet Union Бронеавтомобиль БА-6 - МВСВ-2008 02.jpg Very similar to the BA-3. Both were used against the Japanese in the Battle of Khalkhyn Gol, in the Finnish Winter War, and against the Germans in the early stages of the Eastern Front.
BA-10 Armoured car  Soviet Union Verkhnyaya Pyshma Tank Museum 2015 014.jpg The main armament was the 45mm gun 20-K.
BA-11 Armoured car  Soviet Union БА-11 вид сбоку 4.jpg The main armament was the 45mm gun 20-K.
BA-20 Armoured car  Soviet Union Ba-20 armored car.jpg Special armored version of the GAZ-M1 passenger car. The main armament was the 7.62 DT light machine gun.
BA-64 Armoured scout car  Soviet Union BA-64 in Nizhny Novgorod Kremlin.JPG Based and adapted from a captured German SdKfz 221. The main armament was the 7.62 DT light machine gun.

Half-tracks[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
BA-30 Half-track  Soviet Union BA-30 armored car.jpg A small number of them were produced. The main armament was the 7.62 DT light machine gun.

Trucks[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
GAZ-AA Truck  Soviet Union 1928 Ford Model AA Truck FLW963.jpg Soviet produced vehicle licensed from the Ford AA model of 1930.
GAZ-AAA Truck  Soviet Union ГАЗ-ААА во Владивостоке ф5.JPG
GAZ–MM Truck  Soviet Union ГАЗ-ММ.JPG

Passenger/utility vehicles[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
GAZ-64 Light utility vehicle  Soviet Union Газ-64.JPG 2,500 were produced during the war. The focus switched to building armoured BA-64s, with the availability of American made Jeeps.
GAZ-67 Light utility vehicle  Soviet Union GAZ 67B-5116.JPG
GAZ-M1 Passenger car  Soviet Union Sevastopol Victory Day Parade GAZ-M1 IMG 1572 1725.jpg

Motorcycles[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
PMZ-A-750 Heavy motorcycle  Soviet Union PMZ-A-750.jpg The first heavy motorcycle manufactured in the Soviet Union. Used during the Winter War with unsatisfactory results.
TIZ-AM-600 Heavy motorcycle  Soviet Union Used during the Winter War with unsatisfactory results, it was considered an outdated design.
M-72 Heavy motorcycle  Soviet Union Russia-1999-stamp-M-72.jpg Motorcycle meant to replace the PMZ-A-750 and TIZ-AM-600. In the Eastern Front, motorcycles were produced at both the IMZ and GMZ motorcycle plants. All sidecars for both the M-72 and American Lend-Lease bikes were produced at the GMZ.

Tractors & prime movers[edit]

Name Type Origin Photo Notes
S-60 Tractor  Soviet Union S-60 monument in Inzhenerne, Zaporizhia Oblast (cropped).jpg Heavy tractor with a strong engine meant to haul artillery.
S-65 Tractor  Soviet Union Трактор «Сталинец» С-65.jpg Replacement of the S-60 for towing heavy weapons. Many of these and S-60s were captured by the German Army during their invasion.

Engineering and command[edit]

Miscellaneous vehicles[edit]

Lend-Lease vehicles[edit]

Tanks[edit]

Name Type Origin Quantity Photo Notes
M3A1 (Stuart III) Light tank  United States 1,233 M3 serial 1.JPG From 1941-1945, 1,676 were supplied by the United States as a part of the Lend-Lease.[3] 443 were lost at sea.
M5 (Stuart VI) Light tank  United States 5 Stuart m5a1 cfb borden.jpg 5 were supplied.[3]
M24 Chaffee Light tank  United States 2 M24 Chaffee 33314 4CV pic07.JPG 2 were supplied in 1944.[3]
Valentine tank Infantry tank  United Kingdom 3,462 Valentine Mk.IX.jpg 2,074 supplied by the UK, 1,388 supplied by Canada. 320 were lost at sea by both countries.

Tank destroyers[edit]

Name Type Origin Quantity Photo Notes
T48 Gun Motor Carriage
(SU-57)
Tank destroyer  United States 650 SU-57 ‘211’ - Victory Park, Moscow (26956855649).jpg 650 were supplied.[3] On the chassis of the M3 Half-track equipped with a 57mm gun M1. It was designated as the SU-57 by the Soviet military.

Navy ships and war vessels[edit]

Aircraft[edit]

Radars[edit]

Rockets & bombs[edit]

Cartridges and shells[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Monetchikov, Sergei (2005). История русского автомата [The History of Russian Assault Rifle] (in Russian). St. Petersburg: Military Historical Museum of Artillery, Engineers and Signal Corps. pp. 18–19. ISBN 5-98655-006-4. 
  2. ^ Sami Korhonen (1 November 2000). "Soviet artillery used the during Winter War". The Battles of the Winter War. Retrieved 22 April 2018. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Lend-Lease Armoured Vehicles supplied to the Red Army 1941-1945". WW2 Weapons. 18 December 2017. Retrieved 13 May 2018. 

External links[edit]