List of steamboats on the Yukon River

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Klondikers headed down the Yukon for the Nome Gold Rush, Sept. 22, 1899

This is a list of steamboats on the Yukon River. Please see Steamboats of the Yukon River for historical context.

White Pass & Yukon Route vessels[edit]

White Pass Steam PowerStern Wheel Boats (83 vessels)
Name[1] Registry (-ies) Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Aksala

(Alaska, 1913–1927)

U.S.A. #165171 (1913–1927);

Canada #116621 (1927–1964)

1913 Seattle, Washington (hull);

Whitehorse, Yukon (superstructure)

Nilson & Kelez Shipbuilding Corp. (hull);

WP&YR (superstructure)

1067

(785, 1913–1927)

167 feet Last used in 1951. Broken up at Whitehorse in 1964. Aksala is Alaska spelled backwards.

- Alaska was derived from an Aleut idiom, which figuratively refers to the mainland of Alaska. Literally, it means object to which the action of the sea is directed.[3][4]

Alaska ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Aksala.
Alice (of Kuskokwim) U.S.A. #107253 1895 St. Michael, Alaska Alaska Commercial Co. 400 160 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Marys, Alaska in 1917.

- Named for Alice Levison (1873–1973), daughter of AC Co. president Lewis Gerstle.[5]

Alice (of Susitna) U.S.A. #260095 1909 Seattle, Washington Cook & Lake Shipyards 262 111 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911.[6] Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used by WP&YR in 1917. Sold to The Alaska R.R. in 1926. Retired and resold to the Catholic Church (Holy Cross Mission) in 1953.
Anglian Canada #107512 1898 Teslin, Yukon Teslin & Yukon Transportation Co. 162 85 feet Originally owned by the Canadian Development Co. The T&YT had intended to build the boat for its own use, but the CD Co. bought out the T&YT in February 1898, before the boat was built.[7] Boat acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used by WP&YR in 1901. Broken up at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1931.

- Named for Henry Maitland Kersey (1859-1941), managing director of the CD Co. Kersey was from Suffolk, in East Anglia, England.

Arnold U.S.A. #107353 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Thomas P. H. Whitelaw 692 181 feet Originally owned by Alaska Exploration Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned across the bay from St. Michael, Alaska in 1917.

- Named for Arnold L. Liebes (1889–1957), son of AE Co. president Isaac Liebes.[5]

Australian Canada #107525 1899 Bennett, British Columbia Canadian Development Co. 422 115 feet Originally owned by CD Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used by WP&YR in 1904. Sold to U.S. Public Roads Administration and converted to Barge #1450 in 1942. Transferred back to WP&YR in 1943. Scuttled at Carcross, Yukon about 1970.

- Most likely, named for the Victoria, Australia gold rush of 1851.[8]

Bella U.S.A. #3759 1896 St. Michael, Alaska Matthew Turner 370 140 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Michael in 1917.

- Named for Hannah Isabelle “Bella” Lilienthal (1856–1923), daughter of AC Co. general manager Louis Sloss.[5][9]

Bonanza King

(Gov. Pingree, 1898–1900)

U.S.A. #86414 (1898–1900);

Canada #107851 (1900–1955)

1898 Seattle, Washington Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co.

(hull #1)

466 140 feet Originally owned by Boston & Alaska Transportation Co. Sold to the Yukon Flyer Line in 1900. Resold to P. Burns & Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used as a boat by WP&YR in 1910. Converted to lumber storeroom at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1917. Broken up in 1957.

- Named for Nels Peterson (1850-1939), successful Bonanza Creek miner and owner of the Yukon Flyer Line.[10]

Canadian Canada #107094 1898 Victoria, British Columbia John H. Todd 716 147 feet Originally owned by Canadian Development Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used in 1927. Placed as riprap in Yukon River at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1931. Machinery recovered from river in 1997.

- Most likely, named for the British Columbia, Canada gold rushes of 1850 and 1861.[8]

1st Casca Canada #103919 1898 Victoria, British Columbia Esquimalt Marine Railway Co.

(hull #1)

590 140 feet Originally owned by Casca Trading & Transportation Co. Sold to Otto R. Bremmer in 1899 or 1900. Resold to Ironside, Rennie & Campbell Co. in 1903. Acquired by WP&YR in 1904. Last used in 1909. Broken up at Lower Laberge, Yukon in 1911.

- Kaska may have originated as a Tahltan term, which means old moccasins, and which was a scornful name for the Kaska tribe.[11]

2nd Casca Canada #103919 1911 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 1079 161 feet Foundered at Rink Rapids, Yukon in 1936.

- Kaska may have originated as a Tahltan term, which means old moccasins, and which was a scornful name for the Kaska tribe.[11]

3rd Casca Canada #170618 1937 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 1300 180 feet Last used in 1951. Transferred to Canadian Government in 1960. Demolished by fire (arson) at Whitehorse in 1974.

- Kaska may have originated as a Tahltan term, which means old moccasins, and which was a scornful name for the Kaska tribe.[11]

Chas. H. Hamilton U.S.A. #127290 1897 St. Michael, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull #3)

595 190 feet Originally owned by North American Transportation & Trading Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael Canal, Alaska in 1927.

- Named for Charles H. Hamilton (1872–1929), manager of the NAT&T Co.[5][12]

Clifford Sifton Canada #107528 1898 Bennett, British Columbia Dominion Steamboat Line 291 120 feet Originally owned by Dominion Steamboat. Acquired by WP&YR in 1903. Last used as a powered vessel in 1903. Converted to barge 1st Hootalinqua in 1904. Demolished in a collision at Dawson City, Yukon in 1905.
Columbian Canada #107091 1898 Victoria, British Columbia John H. Todd 716 147 feet Originally owned by Canadian Development Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Exploded at Eagle Rock, Yukon in 1906.

- Most likely, named for the (British) Columbia, Canada gold rushes of 1850 and 1861.[8]

D. R. Campbell U.S.A. #157509 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #23)

718 176 feet Originally owned by Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael Canal, Alaska in 1927.

- Named for David R. Campbell (1830–1911), a Maine wool manufacturer who financed the SYT Co.[13]

Dalton U.S.A. #157507 1898 Port Blakely, Washington Hall Bros. 523 150 feet Originally owned by Canadian Pacific Ry. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold to S. Willey Steamship & Navigation Co. and renamed Capital City in 1901. Resold to McDonald Steamship Co. in 1903. Resold to Olympia-Tacoma Navigation Co. in 1904. Resold to Dallas, Portland & Astoria Navigation Co. in 1906. Broken up in 1919.

- Named for John “Jack” Dalton (1856–1944), Alaskan packer.[14][15]

Dawson Canada #107836 1901 Whitehorse, Yukon W. D. Hofius & Co. for WP&YR 778 167 feet Foundered at Rink Rapids, Yukon in 1926.
Delta U.S.A. #202463 1905 St. Michael, Alaska Joseph M. Supple and Thomas Achilles 293 120 feet Originally owned by Northern Navigation Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used in 1916. Abandoned at St. Michael in 1936.
F. K. Gustin U.S.A. #121071 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #24)

718 176 feet Originally owned by Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Marys, Alaska in 1917.

- Named for Frederick K. Gustin (1856–1937), Chicago, Illinois lawyer, and secretary and treasurer of the SYT Co.[16]

G. M. Dawson U.S.A. #111544 1901 Vancouver, British Columbia Canadian Pacific Ry. 550 151 feet Originally owned by C.P. Ry. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Stripped and hull sold by WP&YR in 1901. Hull abandoned at Queen Charlotte Island, British Columbia.
Gov. Pingree ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Bonanza King.
Gleaner Canada #107526 1899 Bennett, British Columbia John Irving Navigation Co. 241 113 feet Originally owned by Irving Navigation. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used in 1923. Scuttled in Nares Lake, Yukon between 1950 & 1958.

- A gleaner is one who gathers a crop after it is reaped.[17]

Hamlin Canada #107144 1898 Vancouver, British Columbia Canadian Pacific Ry. 515 146 feet Originally owned by C.P. Ry. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold to John Banser, William McCallum, and David Reider in 1902. Resold to Thomas J. Kickham in 1904. Resold to Edward J. Coyle (dealer) in 1910. Resold to Hamlin Towing Co. in 1911. Resold to James H. Green in 1917. Resold to Defiance Packing Co. in 1918. Foundered in Fraser River, British Columbia in 1918.

- Named for Charles Sumner Hamlin (1861–1938), U.S. delegate to the 1897 Anglo-American fur seal fishing convention.

Hannah U.S.A. #96428 1898 Unalaska, Alaska Howard Shipyards & Dock Co. 1130 223 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1917. Demolished by fire at St. Michael shortly after 1944. Had a horizontal, belt-driven electric generator made by A. L. Ide & Sons. This may be the A. L. Ide & Sons unit that is currently on the beach at St. Michael.

- Boat named for Hannah Gerstle (1838–1930), wife of AC Co. president Lewis Gerstle.[5][18]

Herman U.S.A. #96398 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Thomas P. H. Whitelaw 456 175 feet Originally owned by Alaska Exploration Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used in 1922. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael, Alaska in 1927.

- Named for Herman Liebes (1842–1898), head of the AE Co.[5]

Ida May

(Rideout, 1898–1905)

U.S.A. #111182 (1898–1900 & 1905-1917);

Canada #107855 (1900–1905)

1898 Stockton, California California Navigation & Improvement Co. 278 149 feet Originally owned by California Yukon Trading Co. On Dall River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899.[19] Owned by J. A. Smilie by 1902. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1905. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1917.

- Originally named for Walter R. Rideout (1867-1926), president of CYT Co.

Isabelle U.S.A. #100779 1902 St. Michael, Alaska Elbridge T. “E.T.” Barnette 162 87 feet Originally owned by Barnette. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1904. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Marys, Alaska in 1917.

- Named for Isabelle Cleary Barnette (1875–1942), wife of E.T.[12]

J. P. Light U.S.A. #77296 (1898–1900 & 1905-1927);

Canada #107860 (1900–1905)

1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #22)

785 176 feet Originally owned by British America Corp. (J. Whitaker Wright). Sold to Dawson & White Horse Navigation Co. in 1900. Sold to Coal Creek Coal Co. in 1904. Sold to Tanana Trading Co. in 1905. Sold to North American Transportation & Trading Co. in 1906. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael Canal, Alaska in 1927.

- Named for Joseph P. Light (1846-1922), vice president of the Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co.[20]

John C. Barr U.S.A. #77326 (1898–1899 & 1902-1927);

Canada #107853 (1899–1902)

1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Craig Shipbuilding Co. 546 145 feet Originally owned by North American Transportation & Trading Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Converted to stationary power plant for marine ways at St. Michael, Alaska in 1917. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael in 1927.

- Named for Capt. John C. Barr (1844–1925), of the NAT&T Co.[5][12][18]

John Cudahy U.S.A. #77334 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull #14)

819 192 feet Originally owned by North American Transportation & Trading Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael, Alaska in 1927.

- Named for John Cudahy (1843–1915), Chicago merchant and director of NAT&T Co.[5][12]

John J. Healy U.S.A. #77238 1898 St. Michael, Alaska North American Transportation & Trading Co. 450 175 feet Originally owned by NAT&T Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael in 1927.
Joseph Clossett Canada #107621 1898 Bennett, British Columbia John F. Steffan 147 80 feet Originally owned by William J. Rant. Sold to Upper Yukon Co., and resold to Canadian Development Co. in 1899. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used in 1903. Broken up at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1931.

- Named for Joseph Clossett (1845–1915), of Portland, Oregon.

Julia B U.S.A. #205169 1908 Seattle, Washington Cook & Lake Shipyards 835 159 feet Originally owned by Yukon Transportation & Trading Co. Sold to the Western Transportation Co. in 1912. Acquired by WP&YR in 1918. Last used in 1923. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner near Dawson City, Yukon in 1942.

- Named for Julia M. Burrichter (1871–1933), wife of YT&T Co. owner Frank J. Burrichter.[21]

Keno Canada #116618 1922 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 613 141 feet Last used by WP&YR in 1950. Transferred to Canadian Government in 1960. Last commercial steamboat to operate under its own power on the Yukon River, run from Whitehorse to Dawson City, Yukon, August 26–29, 1960. Put on display at Dawson City in 1960.
1st Klondike Canada #116627 1929 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 1285 210 feet Foundered at Hootalinqua, Yukon in 1936.

- Klondike was derived from a Hän idiom, which figuratively means hammer river.[4][14][15][22] Literally, it means Chinook (King) Salmon River.[23][24] The reason for the figurative meaning is that hammers had been used to erect barriers in the Klondike River, in order to catch the Chinook salmon.[4][14][15][22]

2nd Klondike Canada #156744 1937 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 1363 210 feet Last steamboat in regular service on the Upper Yukon River: completed its last voyage on July 4, 1955. Transferred to Canadian Government in 1960. Put on display at Whitehorse in 1966.

- Klondike was derived from a Hän idiom, which figuratively means hammer river.[4][14][15][22] Literally, it means Chinook (King) Salmon River.[23][24] The reason for the figurative meaning is that hammers had been used to erect barriers in the Klondike River, in order to catch the Chinook salmon.[4][14][15][22]

Klondyke U.S.A. #161114 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull #13)

406 121 feet Originally owned by North American Transportation & Trading Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used in 1917. Abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1936.

- Klondyke was derived from a Hän idiom, which figuratively means hammer river.[4][14][15][22] Literally, it means Chinook (King) Salmon River.[23][24] The reason for the figurative meaning is that hammers had been used to erect barriers in the Klondike River, in order to catch the Chinook salmon.[4][14][15][22]

LaFrance Canada #107866 1902 Lower Laberge, Yukon Edward J. Smythe 201 100 feet Originally owned by Merchants Transportation Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1903. Last used by WP&YR in 1905. Sold to Side Streams Navigation Co. in 1908. Foundered and demolished by fire near the mouth of LaFrance Creek, Yukon in 1911.

- Named for Edward LaFrance, Yukon cattle dealer.[25]

Lavelle Young U.S.A. #141529 1898 Portland, Oregon Joseph Paquette 506 140 feet Originally owned by Columbia River Pilots Assn. At Peavey, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Sold to Capt. Charles W. Adams, Thomas Bruce, and George Crummy in 1900. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1903. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold to Thomas A. McGowan and converted to a barge in 1920. Subsequently, abandoned at McGrath, Alaska. Remains are on display at Pioneer Park, Fairbanks, Alaska.

- Named for Lavelle Gilbert, née Young (1896–1994), granddaughter of Charles W. Young, a prominent shipper on the Columbia River.

Leon U.S.A. #141533 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Thomas P. H. Whitelaw 638 181 feet Originally owned by Alaska Exploration Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1943.

- Named for Leon Liebes (1886–1951), son of AE Co. president Isaac Liebes.[5]

Lightning Canada #107156 1898 Vancouver, British Columbia B.C. Iron Works 557 140 feet Originally owned by British America Corp. (J. Whitaker Wright). Sold to Dawson & White Horse Navigation Co. in 1900. Resold to Coal Creek Coal Co. in 1903. Resold to Sour Dough Coal Co. in 1907. Resold to Northern Light, Power & Coal Co. in 1909. Acquired by WP&YR in 1917. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Broken up at Dawson City, Yukon in 1918.
Linda U.S.A. #141561 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Thomas P. H. Whitelaw 692 181 feet Originally owned by Alaska Exploration Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned across the bay from St. Michael, Alaska in 1917.

- Named for Linda Liebes Lederman (1884–1964), daughter of AE Co. president Isaac Liebes.[5]

Louise U.S.A. #141572 1898 Unalaska, Alaska Howard Shipyards & Dock Co. 717 165 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used in 1920. Abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1943.

- Named for Louisa Greenewald (1836–1917), wife of AC Co. official Simon Greenewald.[5]

M. L. Washburn U.S.A. #209341 1911 St. Michael, Alaska Northern Navigation Co. 284 120 feet Originally owned by Northern Navigation. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Foundered just south of Little Salmon, Yukon in 1920.

- Named for Martin L. Washburn (1854–1911), general manager of the NN Co.[9]

Margaret U.S.A. #92890 1897 St. Michael, Alaska Alaska Commercial Co. 520 140 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Hull previously had been barge St. Michael No. 1 (U.S.A. Official No. 57983, built in 1896). Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Marys, Alaska in 1917.

- Named for Margaret Stern, née Wilson (1895-1973), daughter of AC Co. superintendent James M. Wilson.[5]

Mary F. Graff U.S.A. #92856 (1898–1900);

Canada #107839 (1900–1928)

1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #30)

864 177 feet Built for the British America Corp. (J. Whitaker Wright), but sold to Blue Star Navigation Co. On Dall River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[19] Sold to Alaska Exploration Co. in 1899. Sold to Canadian Development Co. in 1900. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used in 1903. Abandoned at Dawson City, Yukon in 1928.

- Named for Mary F. Burleigh, née Graff (1874-1962, m. 1898), wife of entrepreneur Andrew F. Burleigh. In 1897, Andrew Burleigh had contracted with Moran to build the Graff and 11 other steamers (hull ##22-33). The contract was part of a scheme to build a railroad from Haines, Alaska to Five Finger Rapids on the Yukon River.[27] But, by the time that the 12 Moran-built steamers were completed, Burleigh no longer had an interest in them or the Haines-Yukon railroad scheme.[12]

May West ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Vidette.
McConnell Canada #107152 1898 Vancouver, British Columbia Canadian Pacific Ry. 729 142 feet Originally owned by C.P. Ry. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Stripped and hull sold by WP&YR in 1901.

- Named for Richard G. McConnell (1856–1942), the Yukon’s foremost geological explorer.[14]

Minneapolis U.S.A. #92864 1898 Tacoma, Washington Thomas C. Reed 236 109 feet Originally owned by Minnesota & Alaska Development Co. Sold to Alaska Transportation Co. in 1909. Sold to Miners’ & Merchants’ Cooperative Co. in 1910. Sold to Western Transportation Co. in 1912. Acquired by WP&YR in 1918. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold to The Alaska R.R. in 1926. Not used under Alaska R.R. ownership. Abandoned at Chena, Alaska.
Monarch U.S.A. #92855 1898 Ballard, Washington Thomas C. Reed 463 150 feet Originally owned by Columbia Navigation Co. On Dall River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[19] Sold to Yukon Independent Transportation Co. in 1901. Resold to Edward R. Sondheim and Dorah W. “D.W.” Dobbins in 1904. Resold to Capt. Wallace Langley in 1907. Resold to Peter A. Vachon & Joseph S. Sterling, then resold to Schubach-Hamilton Steamship Co. in 1908. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1913. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael, Alaska in 1927.

- Not to be confused with Monarch, Canada #107863, not owned by WP&YR, below.

Nasutlin

(2nd Prospector in 1912 only)

Canada #133738 1912 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 570

(405, 1912–1937)

141 feet

(115 feet, 1912–1937)

Foundered at Dawson City, Yukon in 1952.

- Nasutlin was a loanword used by the Tagish Indians.[28] Its origin was neither Tagish nor Tlingit.[29] Most likely, borrowed from a Southern Tutchone phrase, which means strong flow.[30]

Norcom Canada #116613 1913 St. Michael, Alaska Hull: Northern Navigation Co.;

superstructure: Merchants’ Yukon Transportation Co.

352 130 feet Originally owned by Northern Navigation Co. Included superstructure from Evelyn (U.S.A. Official No. 205767), plus a new hull. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Remains on display at Hootalinqua Island, Yukon.

- Named for the Northern Commercial Co., an affiliate of the Northern Navigation Co.[9]

Ogilvie Canada #107148 1898 Vancouver, British Columbia Canadian Pacific Ry. 742 147 feet Originally owned by C.P. Ry. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Stripped and hull sold by WP&YR in 1901.
Oil City U.S.A. #155318 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #33)

718 176 feet Originally owned by Standard Oil Co. of California. Sold to Charles W. Adams in 1904. Resold to partnership of Adams, the Dominion Commercial Co., and Mersereau Clark in 1905. Resold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1908. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used as a boat under WP&YR ownership. Used by WP&YR as an office and warehouse at Holy Cross, Alaska. Abandoned in 1943.
Pilgrim U.S.A. #150778 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #31)

718 176 feet Built for the British America Corp. (J. Whitaker Wright), but sold to Blue Star Navigation Co. Sold to Columbia Navigation Co. in 1900. Resold to British-American Steamship Co. (Frank Waterhouse, Ltd.) in 1899. Resold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned across the bay from St. Michael, Alaska in 1917.
Portus B. Weare U.S.A. #150646 1892 St. Michael, Alaska North American Transportation & Trading Co. 400 175 feet Originally owned by NAT&T Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael, Alaska in 1927.

- Named for Portus B. Weare (1842–1909), chairman of the NAT&T Co.[5][12][18][31]

1st Prospector Canada #107865 1901 Whitehorse, Yukon Stewart River Navigation Co. 263 111 feet Originally owned by Stewart River Navigation. Sold to M. McConnell in 1902. Acquired by WP&YR in 1907. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Broken up at McIntyre Creek, Yukon in 1912.

- Named for the prospectors that it served.

2nd Prospector ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Nasutlin.
Reaper ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Zealandian.
Reliance U.S.A. #204486 1907 St. Michael, Alaska St. Johns Shipbuilding Co. 291 120 feet Originally owned by Northern Navigation Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used by WP&YR in 1921. Sold to The Alaska R.R. in 1926. Abandoned at Chena, Alaska.

- Named after Ft. Reliance, Yukon.[14][15]

Rideout ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Ida May.
S. S. Bailey Canada #107715 1899 Bennett, British Columbia Louis Paquette 192 110 feet Originally owned by Bennett & Atlin Lake Co. Sold to Canadian Development Co. in 1899. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used in 1904. Broken up at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1931.

- Named for Stephen S. Bailey (1845–1925), Spokane, Washington, businessman.[25]

St. Michael U.S.A. #116816 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #28)

718 176 feet Originally owned by Empire Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Marys, Alaska in 1943.

- Village of St. Michael, Alaska named for Vice Admiral Mikhail D. Tebenkov (1802–1872), governor of Russian America.[15][31][32]

Sarah U.S.A. #116856 1898 Unalaska, Alaska Howard Shipyards & Dock Co. 1130 223 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used in 1918. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael, Alaska in 1927. Demolished by fire at St. Michael shortly after 1944.

- Named for Sarah Sloss (1836–1920), wife of AC Co. general manager Louis Sloss.[5][9][18]

Schwatka U.S.A. #116812 1898 Port Blakely, Washington Hall Bros. 484 146 feet Originally owned by Canadian Pacific Ry. Sold to Charles W. Thebo in 1904. Resold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1907. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used in 1917. Sold to The Alaska Railroad and abandoned near Dawson City, Yukon in 1942.
Scotia Canada #107829 1898 Atlin, British Columbia John Irving Navigation Co. 214 80 feet Operated on Atlin Lake. Originally owned by Irving Navigation. Acquired by WP&YR and enlarged to 214 gross tons in 1901. Last used as a boat in 1918. Used as an office by the Norgold’s officers from 1937 to 1950. Demolished by fire at Atlin in 1967.

- Scotia is the Latinized form of Scotland.

Scout ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Vidette.
Seattle U.S.A. #116817 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #25)

718 176 feet Originally owned by Empire Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned across the bay from St. Michael, Alaska in 1917.
Seattle No. 3 U.S.A. #116854 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull #10)

548 151 feet Originally owned by Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used in 1922. Sold to The Alaska Railroad and abandoned near Dawson City, Yukon in 1942.
Selkirk Canada #107835 1901 Whitehorse, Yukon W. D. Hofius & Co. for WP&YR 777 167 feet Foundered at the mouth of the Stewart River, Yukon in 1920.
Susie U.S.A. #116855 1898 Unalaska, Alaska Howard Shipyards & Dock Co. 1130 223 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used in 1917. Sold to The Alaska Railroad and abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1942. Demolished by fire at St. Michael shortly after 1944.

- Named for Suzanne Niebaum (1851–1936), wife of AC Co. vice president Capt. Gustave F. Niebaum.[5][9][18]

Sybil Canada #107523 1898 Victoria, British Columbia James C. Stratford 653

(622, 1898–1901)

167 feet

(101 feet, 1898–1901)

Originally owned by British-American Steamship Co. (Frank Waterhouse, Ltd.). Sold to Canadian Development Co. in 1900. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used as a powered vessel in 1903. Converted to barge in 1904. Wrecked by ice at Dawson City, Yukon in 1918.
T. C. Power U.S.A. #145790 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull #17)

819 192 feet Originally owned by North American Transportation & Trading Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael, Alaska in 1927.
Tacoma U.S.A. #145773 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #26)

718 176 feet Originally owned by Empire Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Marys, Alaska in 1927.
Tanana U.S.A. #201297 1904 St. Michael, Alaska Northern Commercial Co. 495 150 feet Originally owned by Northern Navigation Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Foundered at Minto, Alaska in 1921.

- Tanana derived from a Lower Tanana phrase, which is not the name of the Tanana River, but is the name of the village. Means river trail.[4][15][33]

Thistle Canada #107867 1902 Lower Laberge, Yukon Donald McPhee 225 102 feet Originally owned by Merchants Transportation Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1903. Sold to Taylor & Drury in 1919. Foundered in Lake Laberge, Yukon in 1929.

- Named for Thistle Creek, site of minor gold excitement in 1898.[25]

Tutshi Canada #138695 1917 Carcross, Yukon Cousins Bros. for WP&YR 1041 167 feet Last steamboat in regular service in the Yukon: last voyage in September 1955. Put on display at Carcross in 1972. Demolished by fire (arson) at Carcross in 1990.

- Tutshi was derived from a Tlingit metaphor,[34] which literally means lake containing charcoal,[35] and figuratively means black lake.[36]

Tyrrell Canada #107159 1898 Vancouver, British Columbia Canadian Pacific Ry. 678 142 feet Originally owned by C.P. Ry. Sold to British America Corp. (J. Whitaker Wright) in 1898. Resold to Dawson & White Horse Navigation Co. in 1900. Resold to John M. Carson in 1904. Resold to Frank W. Arnold in 1905. Acquired by WP&YR in 1906. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Broken up at Dawson City, Yukon in 1918.
Victoria U.S.A. #116811 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #27)

718 176 feet Originally owned by Empire Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned at St. Marys, Alaska in 1927.
Victorian Canada #103917 1898 Victoria, British Columbia John H. Todd 716 146 feet Originally owned by Canadian Development Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used in 1908. Broken up at Dawson City, Yukon in 1928.

- Most likely, named for the Victoria, Australia gold rush of 1851.[8]

Vidette

(May West, 1897–1902; Scout, 1902–1903)

U.S.A. #92896 (1897–1902);

Canada #107869 (1902–1917)

1897 St. Michael, Alaska Payson C. Richardson, Sr. 254

(134, 1897–1911)

119 feet

(96 feet, 1897–1911)

Originally owned by Richardson. Transferred to George B. Wilson in 1901. Sold to the North-West Mounted Police in 1902. Sold to Side Streams Navigation Co. in 1911. Rename to Yorke Barrington proposed in 1911, but never accomplished.[37] Acquired by WP&YR in 1916. Foundered in Lake Laberge, Yukon in 1917.

- Originally named for Anna May Richardson, née West (1862-1939), wife of Payson C., Sr. Vidette is a misspelling of vedette, which is a mounted sentinel in advance of an army for observing enemy activities.

White Horse ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Whitehorse.
White Seal U.S.A. #202409 1905 Fairbanks, Alaska George P. Sproul, George Coleman, and Bert Smith 193 97 feet Originally owned by Sproul. Owned by Tanana Mines R.R. for a short time in 1905, but ownership reverted to Sproul. Acquired by WP&YR in 1915. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold to The Alaska Railroad in 1926. Immediately resold by The A.R.R.

- Named after Kotik, a character in The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling.

Whitehorse

(White Horse, 1901-1930)

Canada #107837 1901 Whitehorse, Yukon W. D. Hofius & Co. for WP&YR 1120

(986, 1901–1930)

171 feet

(167 feet, 1901–1930)

Last used in 1953. Transferred to Canadian Government in 1960. Demolished by fire (arson) at Whitehorse in 1974.

- White Horse was an early spelling of Whitehorse; refers to appearance of rapids in Yukon River.[14][15]

Wilbur Crimmin U.S.A. #81606 (1898–1900 & 1906-1935);

Canada #107864 (1900–1906)

1898 Coupeville, Washington Howard B. Lovejoy 124 80 feet Originally owned by John D. Crimmin, Jr. At Peavey, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Sold to Wallace Langley and A. John Engvick in 1900. Transferred to Langley, alone, in 1904. Sold to Charles W. Adams, Dominion Commercial Co., and Mersereau & Clark in 1906. Resesold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1908. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold to Waechter Bros. in 1923. Abandoned at Seward, Alaska in 1935.

- Named for Exilona L. Wilbur (1845–1920) and John D. Crimmin, Sr. (1835–1906), parents of John D., Jr.

Will H. Isom U.S.A. #81758 1901 Ballard, Washington Andrew Axton & Son Co. 983 184 feet Originally owned by North American Transportation & Trading Co. Forced ashore by ice storm at Point Romanof, Alaska on August 20, 1902. Towed to St. Michael, Alaska, in 1903, never to run again. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and abandoned by new owner at St. Michael in 1927.

- Named for William H. Isom (1828–1929), vice president of the NAT&T Co.[12]

Yorke Barrington ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Remarks for Vidette.
2nd Yukon U.S.A. #165172 1913 Seattle, Washington (hull);

Whitehorse, Yukon (superstructure)

Nilson & Kelez Shipbuilding Corp. (hull);

WP&YR (superstructure)

651 170 feet Sold to The Alaska R.R. in 1942. Damaged by ice at Tanana, Alaska in 1947. Demolished by fire at Tanana in 1948.

- The name Yukon, or ųųg han, is a contraction of the words in the Gwich'in phrase chųų gąįį han, which mean white water river and which refer to “the pale colour” of glacial runoff in the Yukon River.[38][39] The contraction is Ųųg Han, if the /ųų/ remains nasalized, or Yuk Han, if there is no vowel nasalization.[40] In 1843, the Holikachuks had told the Russian-American Company that their name for the river was Yukkhana and that this name meant big river.[41] However, Yukkhana does not literally correspond to a Holikachuk phrase that means big river.[42][43] Then, two years later, the Gwich’ins told the Hudson’s Bay Company that their name for the river was Yukon and that the name meant white water river.[38] White water river in fact corresponds to Gwich’in words that can be shortened to form Yukon.[39] Because the Holikachuks had been trading regularly with both the Gwich’ins and the Yup’iks,[44] the Holikachuks had been in a position to borrow the Gwich’in contraction and to conflate its meaning with the meaning of Kuigpak [River-big], which is the Yup’ik name for the same river. For that reason, the documentary evidence reflects that the Holikachuks had borrowed the contraction Ųųg Han [White Water River] from Gwich’in, and erroneously assumed that this contraction had the same literal meaning as the corresponding Yup’ik name Kuigpak [River-big].

Yukoner Canada #107098 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Canadian Pacific Navigation Co. (not associated with Canadian Pacific Ry. at the time) 781 171 feet Originally owned by CP Nav. Co. (not associated with C.P. Ry. at the time). Sold to North British American Trading & Transportation Co. in 1898. Resold to Trading & Exploration Co. in 1899. Resold to Canadian Development Co. in 1900. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used in 1903. Broken up at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1957.

- For remarks relating to the name Yukon, see, Remarks for 2nd Yukon, U.S.A. #165172, above.

Zealandian

(Reaper in 1900 only[17])

Canada #107830 1900 Bennett, British Columbia Alexander Watson 179 102 feet Originally owned by John Irving Navigation Co. and named Reaper.[17] Sold to the Canadian Development Co. and renamed Zealandian in 1900. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Last used in 1904. Broken up at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1913.

- Most likely, named for the Otago, New Zealand gold rush of 1864.[8]

White Pass Steam PowerScrew Propeller Boats (5 vessels)
Name[1] Registry Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
C. H. Bradley U.S.A. #127254 1898 Ballard, Washington Dusty Diamond Corp. (of Chicago, Illinois) 29 70 feet Originally owned by the Dusty Diamond Corp. At Fish River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Sold to Alaska Exploration Co. in 1899.[45] Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Wrecked at St. Michael, Alaska in 1904. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Abandoned across the bay from St. Michael in 1915.

- If Mr. Bradley was from the same city as the Dusty Diamond Corp. (Chicago), then he would have been Charles Hodgson Bradley (1850-1924), Chief Clerk of the Cook County Circuit Court, and a prominent city politician.[46]

Meteor U.S.A. #93031 1900 San Francisco, California United Engineering Works 68 76 feet Originally owned by Alaska Exploration Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Sold Frank P. Williams in 1923. Converted to Diesel power and enlarged from 68 to 83 gross tons in 1934. Williams died in 1952. Meteor resold to Patrick E. Stoppleman in 1957. Resold to Gulf Navigation & Towing, Ltd. in 1962. Stranded at Coal Harbor, Unga Island, Alaska in 1963.
Omega[47] Canada #107932 1900 Bennett, British Columbia Pacific Contract Co. for WP&YR[47] 127 99 feet Used during railroad construction. Broken up in 1901.
Tasmanian (steamer) Canada #111786 1899 Chiswick, United Kingdom (hull);

Bennett, British Columbia (superstructure)

John I. Thornycroft & Co. (hull);

Canadian Development Co. (superstructure)

21 64 feet Originally owned by Canadian Development. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Used as a launch. Last used by WP&YR in 1901. Sold to Eliza E. Wallace (Mrs. Alfred Wallace) in 1904. Resold to George A. Huff in 1906. Resold to British Columbia Steamship Co. in 1910. Resold to Victor Jacobson in 1911. Resold to Leopold A. Bernays in 1912. Retired in 1940.

- Most likely, named for the Beaconsfield, Tasmania gold rush of 1877.[8]

Torpedo Catcher[47] None 1899 Bennett, British Columbia Pacific Contract Co. for WP&YR Used during railroad construction for transporting goods from Bennett to Carcross. Broken up in 1901. Triple screw propeller system with upright boilers. Built like a big skiff using some parts that miners abandoned. Poor quality. To show the rear, as it was rectangular, the builder wrote “stern” on one end randomly.

- Torpedo catcher is a reference to the slow speed of the boat.[48]

Proposed Steam Scow[47] None proposed for 1900[47] ........ ........ ........ ........ Ordered to be built by Pacific Contract Co.[47] No further evidence of the existence of this boat.
White Pass Gasoline PowerScrew Propeller Boats (28 vessels)
Name[1] Registry Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Anna None 1913 41 feet Acquired by WP&YR in 1922. Sold by WP&YR in 1923.
Brandt None 1929 Vancouver, British Columbia Turner Boat Works 35 feet Built for WP&YR. Exploded at Indian Point, British Columbia in 1947.
Dodo None 1917 Built for WP&YR. Used by WP&YR Mail Service Department until 1925. Last used by WP&YR in 1926. Sold in 1939.
Donjek None by 1915 Acquired by WP&YR in 1915. Sold to George Turner in 1923.

- Donjek was derived from a Northern Tutchone phrase, which means silverberry.[49]

Falcon None 1908 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR Used by WP&YR Mail Service Department. Gone in 1918.
Hawk None 1919 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR Wrecked in 1921. Abandoned in 1922.
Hazel B None 1914 Lake Laberge, Yukon Side Streams Navigation Co. 15 43 feet Originally owned by Side Streams Navigation Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1916. Wrecked by ice in 1944.

- Named for Hazel Barrington (1877-1954), wife of SSN Co. president, Capt. Sydney C. Barrington.[37]

Keno Work Boat None 1948 Built for WP&YR. Last used by WP&YR in 1950. Gone between 1950 & 1958.

- Keno was derived from a French term, which means five winning numbers; a game of chance.

Kotlik None 1916 Seattle, Washington Built for WP&YR. Last used by WP&YR in 1922. Sold by WP&YR in 1924.

- Kotlik was derived from Yup’ik metaphor,[34] which literally means a pair of pants, and figuratively refers to a fork in the river.[4][50]

Loon None 1922 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 30 (estimate) 54 feet Last used by WP&YR in 1951. Transferred to Canadian Park Service by 1998. Transferred to village of Mayo, Yukon in 2005. Restoration is being contemplated. If restored, it would be one of only two former WP&YR vessels in operation.
Norgold None 1934 Vancouver, British Columbia Boeing Aircraft of Canada, Ltd. 6 (estimate) 29 feet Originally owned by Norgold Mines, Ltd. Sold to Bobjo Mines in 1935. Acquired by WP&YR in 1937. Last used by WP&YR in 1950. Sold to A. E. Prince about 1952. Transferred to Canadian Park Service by 1998. Hull is hopelessly rotted.

- Named after Norgold Mines, Ltd.

Olof Splegatus ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Splegatus.
Pelican None 1908 Morris Heights, New York Charles L. Seabury & Co. 32 feet Originally owned by the Episcopal Church. Used by Ven. Hudson Stuck. Acquired by WP&YR in 1919. Used by WP&YR Mail Service Department in 1924. Last used in 1924. Abandoned at Yukon Dam in 1942.
Pete None by 1948 Acquired by WP&YR in 1948. Last used by WP&YR in 1951. Gone between 1950 & 1955.
Pilot No. 2 None 1913 18 30 feet Originally owned by Northern Commercial Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1914. Last used by WP&YR in 1924. Abandoned at Dawson City, Yukon in 1942.
Rapid ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Teal.
Relief None 1903 St. Michael, Alaska Northern Commercial Co. 35 feet Originally owned by Northern Commercial. Acquired by WP&YR from Northern Commercial Co. in 1918. Sold back to Northern Commercial in 1923.
Sea Sled None 1928 Seattle, Washington Pacific Marine Originally owned by WP&YR. Last used by WP&YR in 1933. Engine removed in 1940. Remainder of boat sold in 1945.
Shushanna None by 1919 Acquired by WP&YR in 1919. Sold by WP&YR in 1921.

- Shushanna was derived from an Ahtna phrase, which means copper creek. Not a reference to Copper River.[51]

1st Sibilla

(Sybilla, 1913-1914)

None 1913 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 7 45 feet Used by WP&YR Mail Service Department from 1913 to 1915. Sold to U.S. Government in 1923, and resold to the Northern Commercial Co. in 1923.

- Sibilla had been the name of the yacht on which the financier of the WP&YR, namely William B. Close, spent much of his youth.[52] The White Pass & Yukon Ry. Directors’ Report to the 30th June 1914 reported the name to be Sybilla, an incorrect spelling of Sibilla. A copy of this report undoubtedly went to Mr. Close. The spelling was corrected shortly thereafter.

2nd Sibilla None 1932 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 20 (estimate) 55 feet Sold to George T. Simmons in 1955. Subsequently, resold to James Fordyce. Retired in 1970. Put on display at Carcross, Yukon in 1993.

- Sibilla had been the name of the yacht on which the financier of the WP&YR, namely William B. Close, spent much of his youth.[52]

Splegatus

(Olof Splegatus in 1913 only)

None 1913 White River, Yukon Charles M. Binkley, Sr. 50 feet Originally owned by Max Nelson. Sold to Side Streams Navigation Co. in 1913. Acquired by WP&YR in 1916. Used by WP&YR Mail Service Department from 1919 until 1925. Last used by WP&YR in 1925. Gone between 1950 & 1955.

- Boat named by Max Nelson in 1913.[37]

Tarahne Canada #138539 1917 Atlin, British Columbia Cousins Bros. for WP&YR 286

(177, 1917–1928)

119 feet

(78 feet, 1917–1928)

Operated on Atlin Lake only. Last used as a boat in 1936. On display at Atlin. Used as restaurant.

- Tarahne was directly derived from Tarahini, which was the name of a little creek at Atlin. The name Tarahini was suggested to the ship’s carpenter by Chief Taku Jack. Tarahini had been derived from the Tlingit verb theme téya.aahini, which means stream situated on rock.[53] All vocal sounds in Tarahini occur in English. (Tarahini shortens the Tlingit /téya/ to /ta/, and substitutes the English /ra/ sound for the Tlingit aspirated /.aa/ sound.)[1] The reason for the change from Tarahini to Tarahne is not known.

Tasmanian (launch) None by 1901 Previously owned by Canadian Development Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR and sent to Vancouver, British Columbia in 1902.

- Most likely, named for the Beaconsfield, Tasmania gold rush of 1877.[8]

Teal

(Rapid, 1908-1909)

None 1908 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR Originally owned by WP&YR. Last used by WP&YR in 1922. Gone between 1950 & 1955.
Tyee None by 1912 Acquired by WP&YR in 1912. Last used by WP&YR in 1912. Sold by WP&YR in 1923.

- Tyee a is Chinook Jargon term, which means chief.[4][15][31]

Wahpoo None 1918 Acquired by WP&YR in 1919. Last used by WP&YR in 1924. Abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1927.

- “Wahpoo” was the nickname of WP&YR Traffic Manager Albert F. Zipf (1873-1936), derived from a Yup’ik phrase, which means to shout or to scream.[54]

Warrior U.S.A. #204935 1905 Pittsburg, California Siino Boat Works 7 34 feet Acquired by WP&YR in 1918. Sold to Frank P. Williams in 1923. Converted to Diesel power in 1947. Resold to Northern Commercial Co. in 1949. Destroyed by a storm at St. Michael, Alaska in July 1965.
Woodchuck None 1939 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 8 (estimate) 37 feet Originally owned by WP&YR. Last used by WP&YR in 1951. Leased to Prospectors Airways in 1954. Sold to Ollie MacDonald in the 1960s. Transferred to McBride Museum in 2012. Restored in 2014.
Zealandian (launch) None by 1901 Previously owned by Canadian Development Co. Acquired by WP&YR in 1901. Not used under WP&YR ownership. Sold by WP&YR in 1902.

- Most likely, named for the Otago, New Zealand gold rush of 1864.[8]

Unknown Name None by 1899 20 feet Acquired by WP&YR in 1899. Used on Summit Lake during June 1899. Last used by WP&YR in 1899.
White Pass Diesel PowerScrew Propeller Boats (6 vessels)
Name[1] Registry (-ies) Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Clifford J. Rogers Canada #198983 (1955–1966);

U.K. #198983 (1966–1969); Liberia #3412 (1969–1975)

1955 Montreal, Quebec Canadian Vickers Shipyards, Ltd.

(hull #265)

3000 335 feet Container ship. Originally owned by WP&YR. Constructed in response to Canadian Pacific Ry's. decision not to handle container traffic.[55] Used on Inside Passage run between North Vancouver, British Columbia and Skagway, Alaska. Sold to Marine Commerce, Ltd. and registered in United Kingdom in 1966. Resold to Lampsis Navigation, Ltd., renamed Lampsis, and registered in Liberia in 1969. Renamed Drosia in 1972. Sank at 35.26° N, 74.34° W in 1975. Although this location is within the Bermuda Triangle, the loss was not considered particularly mysterious.

- Named for Clifford J. Rogers (1887–1970), WP&YR president.[18][56]

Frank H. Brown Canada #322244 (1965–1993);

Russia #M-44845 (1993–1997); IMO6514170

1965 Montreal, Quebec Canadian Vickers Shipyards, Ltd.

(hull #284)

8040 394 feet Container ship. Originally owned by WP&YR. Used on Inside Passage run between North Vancouver, British Columbia and Skagway, Alaska. From 1979 to 1981, used as a barge, towed by Pacific Challenge of Knight Towing, Ltd.[57] Reverted to its own power thereafter. Operations suspended from 1983 to 1986. Sold to Portofino, Ltd. and registered in Russia in 1993. Broken up at Chittagong, Bangladesh in 1997.

- Named for Frank H. Brown (1894–1975), WP&YR president.[58]

Kestrel ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Neecheah.
3rd Klondike Canada #330809;

IMO6912449

1969 Montreal, Quebec Canadian Vickers Shipyards, Ltd.

(hull #294)

8043 394 feet Container ship. Originally owned by WP&YR. Used on Inside Passage run between North Vancouver, British Columbia and Skagway, Alaska. From 1979 to 1981, used as a barge, towed by Pacific Challenge of Knight Towing, Ltd.[57] Continued in use as a barge from 1981 to 1982. Operations suspended in 1982. Sold by WP&YR in 1988. Broken up at Kaohsiung, Taiwan in 1989.

- Klondike was derived from a Hän idiom, which figuratively means hammer river.[4][14][15][22] Literally, it means Chinook (King) Salmon River.[23][24] The reason for the figurative meaning is that hammers had been used to erect barriers in the Klondike River, in order to catch the Chinook salmon.[4][14][15][22]

Lou-Ann I Canada #158932 1936 Vancouver, British Columbia 17 37 feet Originally owned by Lynton H. Boyce. Acquired by WP&YR in 1942. Registry closed in 1984.

- Named for Louisa J. Boyce (1857–1936), Lynton’s mother; and Annie Glew Arnell (1863–1959), Lynton’s mother-in-law.

Neecheah

(Kestrel, 1920–1921)

U.S.A. #220473 (1920–1922);

Canada #116619 (1922–1960)

1920 Whitehorse, Yukon WP&YR 85

(93, 1922–1942; 53, 1920–1922)

79 feet;

64 feet (1920–1922)

Originally gasoline powered. Converted to Diesel power in 1942. Last used by WP&YR in 1951. Sold by WP&YR in 1958. Put on display at the Yukon Transportation Museum in 1990.

- Neecheah appears to mean peaceful shoreline in Tlingit.[59] Name may be a reference to the absence of sternwheel disturbance on the water.

Yukon Rose Canada #116630 1929 Vancouver, British Columbia Askew Boat Works 32 61 feet Only former WP&YR boat still operating. (But see, Loon Remarks.) Originally, gasoline powered and owned by Taylor & Drury, Ltd. Sold to Jack McDonald in 1943. Acquired by WP&YR in 1948. Converted to Diesel power in 1949. Last used by WP&YR in 1951. Sold to Ray Chaykowski in 1955. Resold to Charlie Garvice by 1961. Resold to Rudy Burian in 1962. Resold to Gregory H. Caple in 1977. Resold to Murray Matchett (M.O.), Ron McCready, and Kevin Hewer in 1984. Resold to Marc Johnson in 2001. Vintage engine installed in 2007, but not original to this vessel. Refloated in 2009.

- For remarks relating to the name Yukon, see, Remarks for 2nd Yukon, U.S.A. #165172, above.

White Pass Barges (102 vessels): 25 barges built by White Pass. 58 barges (including 7 not used) purchased from the Northern Navigation and Northern Commercial Cos. 19 barges (including 2 not used) purchased from others.

No. of Barges used in each year: 1903–4; 1904–7; 1905–8; 1906–10; 1907–13; 1908 to 1912–12; 1913–13; 1914 to 1916–63 (reflects purchase of Northern Navigation Co.); 1917–58; 1918 and 1919–55; 1920–54; 1921–47; 1922–45; 1923–42 (reflects end of service west of Tanana); 1924–32; 1925 and 1926–23; 1927 and 1928–24; 1929–26; 1930–22; 1931–21; 1932–22; 1933–21; 1934 to 1937–20; 1938 to 1940–18; 1941–17; 1942–16; 1943–12 (reflects end of service west of Dawson); 1944 to 1947–13; 1948–15; 1949–16; 1950–14; 1951–12.

For the roster of White Pass winter stages, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

For the roster of White Pass railroad equipment, see, List of White Pass and Yukon Route locomotives and cars.

Alaska Railroad vessels[edit]

A.R.R. Steam PowerStern Wheel Boats (13 vessels)
Name[1] Registry Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Alice (of Susitna) U.S.A. #260095 1909 Seattle, Washington Cook & Lake Shipyards 262 111 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911.[6] Sold to White Pass in 1914. Purchased by A.R.R. in 1926. Retired and sold to the Catholic Church (Holy Cross Mission) in 1953.
Barry K

(Lewiston, 1923–1940)

U.S.A. #223498 1923 Portland, Oregon Supple & Martin 581 160 feet Originally owned by Oregon-Washington R.R. & Navigation Co. (Union Pacific R.R.). Sold to Western Transportation Co. in 1940. Purchased by A.R.R. in 1944. Retired in 1947. Broken up in 1950.
Duchesnay ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Gen. Jeff C. Davis.
Gen. J. W. Jacobs None 1908 Portland, Oregon Willamette Iron & Steel Works 319 126 feet Originally owned by U.S. Army. Transferred to Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1922. A.E.C. reorganized as The Alaska Railroad in 1923. Jacobs retired in 1933. Broken up at Nenana, Alaska.

- Named for Brig. Gen. Joshua W. Jacobs (1843–1905).

Gen. Jeff C. Davis

(Duchesnay, 1898–1900)

Canada #107151 1898 Vancouver, Washington Canadian Pacific Ry. 277 120 feet Originally owned by C.P. Ry. Sold to Edward J. Rathbone in 1899. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1900. Transferred to Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1922. A.E.C. reorganized as The Alaska Railroad in 1923. Davis retired and broken up at Nenana, Alaska in 1933.

- Originally named for Charles-Edmond J. Duchesnay (1854-1901), civil engineer for the C.P. Ry.

Lewiston ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Barry K.
Minneapolis U.S.A. #92864 1898 Tacoma, Washington Thomas C. Reed 236 109 feet Originally owned by Minnesota & Alaska Development Co. Sold to Alaska Transportation Co. in 1909. Sold to Miners’ & Merchants’ Cooperative Co. in 1910. Sold to Western Transportation Co. in 1912. Acquired by White Pass in 1918. Purchased by The Alaska R.R. in 1926. Not used under Alaska R.R. ownership. Abandoned at Chena, Alaska.
Nenana None 1933 Nenana, Alaska Berg Shipbuilding Co. 1128 210 feet No passengers regularly carried after 1949. Leased to Yutana Barge Line in 1954. Last steamboat in regular service on Lower Yukon River, 1954. Officially retired in 1955. Sold to Greater Fairbanks Opportunities, Inc. in 1956. Last voyage under power was from Nenana to Fairbanks, Alaska in May 1957. Put on display at Pioneer Park, Fairbanks in 1965.

- Nenana was derived from a Lower Tanana phrase, which means stopping-while-migrating river. Looks like a contraction or an idiom, because it literally appears to mean something less, such as land by the river.[33][60]

Omineca Canada #126248 1909 Victoria, British Columbia Alexander Watson, Jr. 583 137 feet Originally owned by Foley, Welch & Stewart. Obtained in 1915 by the Alaskan Engineering Commission. Used on the Susitna River and the Cook Inlet. Retired at the end of 1917. Gone sometime between 1923 & 1930. Never on the Yukon River.

- Omineca was derived from a Sekani phrase, which means slow moving water.

Reliance U.S.A. #204486 1907 St. Michael, Alaska St. Johns Shipbuilding Co. 291 120 feet Originally owned by Northern Navigation Co. Sold to White Pass in 1914. Purchased by A.R.R. in 1926. Last used in 1926. Abandoned at Chena, Alaska.

- Named after Ft. Reliance, Yukon.[14][15]

Schwatka U.S.A. #116812 1898 Port Blakely, Washington Hall Bros. 484 146 feet Originally owned by Canadian Pacific Ry. Sold to Charles W. Thebo in 1904. Resold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1907. Acquired by White Pass in 1914. Purchased by The Alaska Railroad and abandoned near Dawson City, Yukon in 1942. Not used under Alaska R.R. ownership.
Seattle No. 3 U.S.A. #116854 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull #10)

548 151 feet Originally owned by Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by White Pass in 1914. Purchased by The Alaska Railroad and abandoned near Dawson City, Yukon in 1942. Not used under Alaska R.R. ownership.
Susie U.S.A. #116855 1898 Unalaska, Alaska Howard Shipyards & Dock Co. 1130 223 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Acquired by White Pass in 1914. Purchased by The Alaska Railroad and abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1942. Not used under Alaska R.R. ownership. Demolished by fire at St. Michael shortly after 1944.

- Named for Suzanne Niebaum (1851–1936), wife of AC Co. vice president Capt. Gustave F. Niebaum.[5][9]

White Seal U.S.A. #202409 1905 Fairbanks, Alaska George P. Sproul, George Coleman, and Bert Smith 193 97 feet Originally owned by Sproul. Owned by Tanana Mines R.R. for a short time in 1905, but ownership reverted to Sproul. Acquired by White Pass in 1915. Sold to The Alaska Railroad and immediately resold in 1926. Not used under Alaska R.R. ownership.

- Named after Kotik, a character in The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling.

2nd Yukon U.S.A. #165172 1913 Seattle, Washington (hull);

Whitehorse, Yukon (superstructure)

Nilson & Kelez Shipbuilding Corp. (hull);

White Pass (superstructure)

651 170 feet Originally owned by White Pass. Purchased by A.R.R. in 1942. Damaged by ice at Tanana, Alaska in 1947. Demolished by fire at Tanana in 1948.

- For remarks relating to the name Yukon, see, Remarks for 2nd Yukon, U.S.A. #165172, under White Pass and Yukon Route, above.

A.E.C. Steam PowerScrew Propeller Boats (4 vessels)
Name[1] Registry Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Anne W U.S.A. #211862 1913 Portland, Oregon Portland Shipbuilding Co. 84 88 feet Originally owned by Hosford Transportation Co. Purchased by Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1915. Used on the Cook Inlet. Sold to Anderson Towboat Co. in 1925. Resold to Pioneer Sand & Gravel Co. in 1927. Converted to Diesel power in 1928. Retired in 1967. Never on the Yukon River.

- Named for Anne W. Staley, née Wentworth (1906-fl. 1945), daughter of Portland Lumber Co. vice president Lloyd J. Wentworth.

Crook

(Richmond Hill, 1882-1897; Roumanian, 1897-1899)

U.K. #87858 1882 Dumbarton, Scotland Henry Murray & Co. 4126 420 feet Originally, owned by the Twin Screw Line. Sold to Austin, Baldwin & Co. in 1897. Sold to the U.S. Army in 1898. Transferred to Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1916. Used between Anchorage and Seattle. Transferred back to the Army in 1918. Broken up in 1920. Never on the Yukon River.
Eklutna None by 1917 41 feet Owned by Alaskan Engineering Commission. Used on the Cook Inlet. Retired at the end of 1917. Gone between 1924 & 1930. Never on the Yukon River.

- Eklutna was derived from a Dena'ina idiom, which figuratively refers to two hills near the Eklutna River. Literally, it means objects river,[4][61] the “objects” being the two hills.

Hero ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, L. Roscoe.
L. Roscoe

(Hero, 1918 to 1921~1922; San Pedro, 1921~1922 to 1942)

U.S.A. #200158 1903 Hoquiam, Washington 117 86 feet Originally owned by Oscar W. Hurd. Oscar died in 1914. Boat purchased by Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1916. Operated on the Cook Inlet. Never on the Yukon River. Sold to Independent Towing Co. in 1918. Resold to San Pedro Launch & Towboat Co. in 1921 or 1922. Resold to J. P. Allender and converted to Gasoline power in 1933 or 1934. Resold to C. M. Wilkins in 1935 or 1936. Resold to Richard E. Nordstrom in 1938 or 1939. Resold to Alicia Dahlin and converted to Diesel power in 1939 or 1940. Gone in 1942.

- Named for Lionel Roscoe Hurd (1893-1960), son of Oscar W.

Richmond Hill ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Crook.
Roumanian ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Crook.
San Pedro ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, L. Roscoe.
A.R.R. Gasoline PowerStern Wheel Boats (2 vessels)
Name[1] Registry Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Matanuska None 1915 Seattle, Washington Alaskan Engineering Commission 66 feet A.E.C. reorganized as The Alaska Railroad in 1923. Matanuska transferred to Civil Aeronautics Administration in 1951.

- Name derived from an unknown Russian phrase that was corrupted by the Dena'ina Indians, and that relates both to copper (медьmed’) and to the Ahtna Indians.[15][31] Using translate.google.com (Mar. 13, 2014) to find a conforming Russian phrase which reflects minimum vocal corruption, one finds, for example, меди на ушах (medi na ushakh - copper on the ears [i.e., jewelry?]).

Midnight Sun None 1911 Whitehorse, Yukon 45 feet Originally assigned to the U.S. Coast & Geodetic Survey. Transferred to the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1915. Used on the Tanana River. Gone between 1924 & 1930.

- Most A.E.C. boats that were initially used on the Tanana River had names consisting of “Sun” plus another word.[62]

A.R.R. Gasoline PowerScrew Propeller Boats (11 vessels)
Name[1] Registry Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Alaska None by 1917 42 feet Acquired by the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1917. Used on the Cook Inlet. Gone between 1930 & 1942. Never on the Yukon River.

- Alaska was derived from an Aleut idiom, which figuratively refers to the mainland of Alaska. Literally, it means object to which the action of the sea is directed.[3][4]

Alenco None by 1918 42 feet Acquired by the Alaskan Engineering Commission by 1918. Used on the Cook Inlet. Gone between 1919 & 1923. Never on the Yukon River.

- Alenco is an acronym, derived from Alaskan Engineering Commission.

B&B No. 1 None 1916 Anchorage, Alaska Sydney C. Barrington (1875-1963) and Charles M. Binkley, Sr. (1881-1923) 65 feet Originally owned by Barrington and Binkley. Transferred to the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1916. Used on the Susitna River. Gone between 1919 & 1923. Never on the Yukon River.

- Named for Barrington and Binkley.

B&B No. 2 None 1916 Anchorage, Alaska Sydney C. Barrington (1875-1963) and Charles M. Binkley, Sr. (1881-1923) 87 feet Originally owned by Barrington and Binkley. Transferred to the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1916. Used on the Susitna River. Gone between 1924 & 1930. Never on the Yukon River.

- Named for Barrington and Binkley.

B&B No. 3 None 1916 Anchorage, Alaska Sydney C. Barrington (1875-1963) and Charles M. Binkley, Sr. (1881-1923) 87 feet Originally owned by Barrington and Binkley. Transferred to the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1916. Used on the Susitna River. Gone between 1930 & 1942. Never on the Yukon River.

- Named for Barrington and Binkley.

Betty M None 1917 Anchorage, Alaska Alaskan Engineering Commission 34 feet Used on the Susitna River. Gone between 1924 & 1930. Never on the Yukon River.

- Most likely, named for Elizabeth M. “Betty” Meiggs, née Mears (1910-1992), daughter of AEC commissioner Frederick Mears.[63]

Islander U.S.A. #210852 1912 Mt. Vernon, Washington 15 47 feet Acquired by Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1915. Used on the Cook Inlet. Gone between 1919 & 1923. Never on the Yukon River.

- Most likely, named for an island or islands in Puget Sound.

Josephine None 1917 Anchorage, Alaska Alaskan Engineering Commission 46 feet Used on the Susitna River. Gone between 1919 & 1923. Never on the Yukon River.

- Most likely, named for Josephine W. McVay, née Mears (1908-1965), daughter of AEC commissioner Frederick Mears.[63]

Sunbeam None by 1918 32 feet Acquired by the Alaskan Engineering Commission by 1918. Used on the Tanana River. Gone between 1930 & 1942.

- Most A.E.C. boats that were initially used on the Tanana River had names consisting of “Sun” plus another word.[62]

Sunflower None by 1918 34 feet Acquired by the Alaskan Engineering Commission by 1918. Used on the Tanana River. Gone between 1930 & 1942.

- Most A.E.C. boats that were initially used on the Tanana River had names consisting of “Sun” plus another word.[62]

Vibienna None 1917 Anchorage, Alaska Alaskan Engineering Commission 36 feet Owned by A.E.C. Used on the Cook Inlet. Gone between 1918 & 1923. Never on the Yukon River.
A.R.R. Diesel PowerScrew Propeller Boats (2 vessels)
Name[1] Registry Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Bella Catherine ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Tanana.
Tanana

(Bella Catherine, from 2012)

U.S.A. #272122 1953 Portland, Oregon Albina Engine & Machine Works

(hull #278)

450 110 feet Purchased new. Leased to Yutana Barge Line from 1954 to 1980. Sold to Yutana Barge Line in 1980. Transferred to Crowley Marine Services, Inc. in 2005. Sold to Nerka Transport LLC in 2012.

- Tanana derived from a Lower Tanana phrase, which is not the name of the Tanana River, but is the name of the village. Means river trail.[4][15][33]

3rd Yukon U.S.A. #272121 1953 Portland, Oregon Albina Engine & Machine Works

(hull #277)

336 110 feet Purchased new. Leased to Yutana Barge Line from 1954 to 1977. Demolished by fire (suspicious origins) near Hot Springs, Alaska in 1977.

- For remarks relating to the name Yukon, see, Remarks for 2nd Yukon, U.S.A. #165172, under White Pass and Yukon Route, above.

Other vessels[edit]

The following lists many pre-1955[64] vessels of the Yukon River, tributaries, and headwaters that are not listed above. It is not a complete list.

Misc. Yukon River Steam PowerStern Wheel Boats
Name[1] Registry (-ies) Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
A. J. Goddard Canada #107517 1898 San Francisco, California (hull);

Bennett, British Columbia (superstructure)

Risdon Iron Works (hull);

James H. Calvert (superstructure)

15 50 feet Originally owned by Upper Yukon Co. Sold to Henry A. Munn in 1899. Foundered at the foot of Lake Laberge, Yukon in 1901. Discovered in 2008 by a team of underwater archeologists, slightly damaged and sitting upright on the bottom of Lake Laberge.

- Named for Albert J. Goddard (1863–1958).[25]

Alameda

(Lully C in 1899 only)

Canada #107257 1898 New Westminster, British Columbia Coffey & Hanley 32 50 feet Originally owned by Upper Yukon Co. Sold to John J. McKenna in 1898. Sold to Victoria Yukon Trading Co. in 1899, and resold back to McKenna later in 1899. Wrecked and abandoned in 1920.
Alaska Union U.S.A. #107495 1898 Nunivak Island, Alaska Alaska Union Mining Co. 214 110 feet Owned by AUM Co. Stranded at Seaforth, Alaska, on the South Fork of the Koyukuk River in 1899.[26]
Anawanda U.S.A. #107421 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Joseph Supple 31 46 feet Originally owned by Anawanda Mining & Milling Co. (New York firemen). At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. For sale in 1899.[65] Listed in Jones (1904). Registry closed in 1913 or 1914.
Arctic U.S.A. #107254 1889 St. Michael, Alaska Alaska Commercial Co. 42 140 feet Owned by AC Co. Wrecked by ice at Forty Mile, Yukon in 1897.
Arctic Boy U.S.A. #107411 1898 St. Michael, Alaska U.S. Mining, Development & Lumber Co. 74 124 feet Originally owned by USMD&L Co. (of Cincinnati, Ohio). Sold to Elbridge T. “E.T.” Barnette and Charles Smith in 1901. Later in 1901, Foundered at St. Michael.
Argo ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Lieut. Smith.
Athol U.S.A. #107414 1898 Unalaska, Alaska 16 42 feet Not inspected. Registry closed in 1902 or 1903.
Atlas None by 1914 Owned by Clarence D. Flanagan. Foundered on the Upper Tanana River in 1916.
1st Atlinto

(Glengarry, 1904-1906)

None 1904 Atlin, British Columbia William J. Smith Side wheels. Operated on Atlin Lake. Owned by Smith and James D. Durie. Retired in 1907 or 1908.

- Atlinto, was derived from a hybrid word, consisting of the Tlingit word for big lake, plus the Tagish word for water: literally, big lake water.[14][36][66] In turn, the name Atlinto River literally means big lake water river.

Aurora No. 2 U.S.A. #107359 1898 San Francisco, California 54 63 feet Originally owned by Eugene A. Mantell (of San Francisco). At Bergman, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26][67] Sold to Alaska Commercial Co. and broken up in 1899.

- Court Aurora No. 2 was the San Francisco chapter of the Foresters of America.

Aurum None 1898 Seattle, Washington 19 Operated on the Lower Yukon River. Last inspected in 1903. Listed in Jones (1904). Aurum is the Latin word for gold.
1st Beaver U.S.A. #3649 1895 Benicia, California 38 59 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Sold to Pacific Packing & Navigation Co. in 1897 or 1898. Registry closed in 1912 or 1913.
2nd Beaver U.S.A. #3763 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Harry A. Parshall & Co. (from Beaver and Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania) 35 55 feet Owned by Parshall and his company. At Alatna River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[67] Foundered at St. Michael in 1899.
Bellingham None 1897 Bennett, British Columbia Lewis Stenger and A. H. Willock 35 feet Operated on Bennett Lake. Owned by Michael J. Dignan, Stenger, and Willock. Gone in 1899.

- Bellingham, Washington was the home of Lewis Stenger.

Ben Hur U.S.A. #205562 1906 Nome, Alaska 46 76 feet Owned by William McCamant in 1925. Abandoned in 1926 or 1927.
Blackfoot None by 1898 At Hogatza River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899.[68]
Burpee Canada #107157 1898 Toronto, Ontario Polson Iron Works

(1 of hull ##30-34)

9 46 feet Owned by Isaac Burpee (1875-1951). Registry closed in 1914.
Caribou U.S.A. #208963 1910 Fairbanks, Alaska 46 57 feet Owned by William Daniels. Abandoned in 1923 or 1924.
Carl White U.S.A. #222058 1919 Fairbanks, Alaska 43 65 feet Owned by Carl C. White (1880-1933). Abandoned at Fairbanks in 1926.
City of Bradford U.S.A. #127288 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 39 44 feet Owned by Wenthrop Mining & Trading Co. (of Pennsylvania). Last inspected in 1903. Listed in Jones (1904). Registry closed in 1908 or 1909.
City of Chicago U.S.A. #127296 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Joseph Supple 142 85 feet Originally owned by John Myers (of Chicago Alaska Transportation Co.). Last inspected in 1898. Sold to Donald Smith in 1899. Registry closed in 1900.
City of Paris U.S.A. #127269 1898 Seattle, Washington Richard A. Talbot 300 120 feet Originally owned by Paris-Alaska Mining Co. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Sold to Alaska Commercial Co. in 1899. Demolished by fire (arson) at Bergman, Alaska in 1901.

- Named for Paris, Missouri, home of the Paris-Alaska Mining Co.

City of Sault Ste. Marie U.S.A. #127827 1898 Dutch Harbor, Alaska 148 93 feet Built by a syndicate from Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan for its own use. Sold to North American Transportation & Trading Co. and broken up at Dawson City, Yukon in 1899.
Clara U.S.A. #127249 1898 San Francisco, California John Cameron 97 76 feet Originally owned by California & Northwest Trading & Mining Co. C&NWT&M Co. dissolved, and boat sold to the Alaska Exploration Co. in 1898. Engines installed into the Monarch (Canada #107863) in 1900. Boat broken up at Dawson City, Yukon in 1901.

- Named for Clara E. Roncovieri (1860-1954), wife of C&NWT&M Co. president Alfred Roncovieri.

“Clara Monarch” ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Monarch, Canada #107863, below.
Clio U.S.A. #127297 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 34 64 feet Registry closed in 1916 or 1917.
Cora ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Koakuk.
D. Armstrong U.S.A. #157521 1898 St. Michael, Alaska St. Marys Mining & Milling Co. 32 56 feet Originally owned by St. Marys (Ohio) Mining & Milling Co. At Red Mountain Creek (a.k.a. “Lost Woman Creek”) on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Sold to Alaska Commercial Co. in 1900. Wrecked at New Hamilton, Alaska in 1903 or 1904.

- Named for David Armstrong, Jr. (1833-1924), merchant in St. Marys, Ohio.

Dora ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Olive May.
Dorothy U.S.A. #157505 1898 Seattle, Washington 126 75 feet Originally owned by Koyukuk Mining & Exploration Co. At Bergman, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] KM&E Co. dissolved in 1904. Boat converted to gasoline power in 1911. Registry closed in 1916 or 1917.

- Named for Dorothy W. Lund (1897-1972), daughter of Capt. George H. Wonson of the KM&E Co.

Dusty Diamond U.S.A. #157522 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Dusty Diamond Corp. (of Chicago, Illinois) 101 75 feet Built by the Dusty Diamond Corp., but sold to the Klondike Promotion Co. (also of Chicago) in 1898. At Fish River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899. Sold to Capt. James A. “Andy” Pate, H. A. Green, and H. S. Chelton in 1899. Resold to De Soto Placer Mining Co. in 1903. Resold to Edward B. Barthrop in 1904. Owned by Edward J. Hackett by 1912. Wrecked in the Upper Tanana River in 1914 or 1915.
Edith M. Kyle U.S.A. #136676 1898 San Francisco, California 54 62 feet Originally owned by a company from Boston, Massachusetts, led by George Kyle. At Arctic City, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Sold to Frank L. Pickart, Gordon C. Bettles, and Charles A. Pickart in 1900. Broken up in 1901.
Edna None by 1911 Not known whether stern wheel or screw propeller propulsion. Operated on the Lower Yukon River. Owned by Robert H. Griffis and James H. Haley. Gone after 1911.
Eldorado

(Philip B. Low, 1898–1899)

U.S.A. #150776 (1898–1899);

Canada #107852 (1899–1903)

1898 Seattle, Washington Puget Sound Bridge & Dredging Co. 466 140 feet Originally owned by Boston & Alaska Transportation Co. Acquired the nickname “Fillup Below” because it sank several times. Sold to Yukon Flyer Line in 1899. Sold to Capt. Ernest C. Miller in 1901. Broken up at Dawson City, Yukon in 1903.

- Boat named for Eldorado Creek, the primary tributary of Bonanza Creek, the latter creek being where the owner of the Yukon Flyer Line, Nels Peterson, made his fortune.

Ella U.S.A. #202300 1905 Seattle, Washington Henry Bratnober 419 120 feet Originally owned by the Tanana Trading Co. Sold to the North American Transportation & Trading Co. and, then, to the Merchants’ Yukon Transportation Co. in 1906. Foundered after striking an object at Tolovana, Alaska in 1909.

- Named for Ella Bratnober (1856–1947), wife of Henry.

Emily M U.S.A. #136667 1898 Brownsville, Oregon 12 32 feet At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Sold to H. B. Meyer in 1899. Last inspected in 1901. Registry closed in 1903.
Emma Canada #107260 1898 New Westminster, British Columbia W. M. Gifford 82 54 feet Originally owned by William J. Rant. Machinery removed from boat in 1899. Sold to John H. Tulley in 1903. Resold to Arthur J. Simonds in 1904. Resold back to Rant by 1907. Wrecked and abandoned. Registry closed in 1920.
Emma Nott Canada #107256 1898 Bennett, British Columbia Robert J. “Joe” Nott 48 56 feet Originally owned by “Joe” Nott. Sold to Arthur J. Simonds in 1903. Broken up in 1908.

- Boat named for Emma Nott Litster (1892–1951), daughter of “Joe.”[25]

Englewood U.S.A. #136716 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 26 51 feet Registry closed in 1903 or 1904.
Evelyn U.S.A. #205767 1908 St. Michael, Alaska Henry Bratnober 352 122 feet Originally owned by Upper Tanana Trading & Transportation Co. Sold to Merchants’ Yukon Transportation Co. by 1912. Wrecked in 1913. Later in 1913, superstructure used to make the Norcom.
Explorer U.S.A. #136583 1885 Mare Island, California U.S. Navy 16 50 feet Originally owned by U.S. Navy. On Lt. George M. Stoney expedition in 1885 and 1886. Sold to Charles Peterson in 1886. Sold to the Catholic Church (Russian Mission) between 1886 & 1888. Awarded its official number (136583) as a commercial vessel in 1895. Sold to Northern Commercial Co. between 1901 & 1906. Foundered at Russian Mission, Alaska in 1906.
F. H. Kilbourne Canada #107516 1898 San Francisco, California (hull);

Bennett, British Columbia (superstructure)

Risdon Iron Works (hull);

James H. Calvert (superstructure)

87 50 feet Originally owned by Upper Yukon Co. Sold to Henry Alexander Munn in 1899. Retired in 1900. Abandoned in 1901. Remains scrapped in 1999.

- Named for Frank H. Kilbourne (1857–1928), Seattle, Washington businessman.

Flora Canada #103916 1898 Wheaton River, Yukon Bennett Lake & Klondyke Navigation Co. 63 95 feet

(80 feet, 1898-1900)

Originally owned by BL&KN Co. Transferred to the Klondyke Corp. in 1900. Converted to a barge and sold to Five Finger Coal Co. in 1902. Sold to Fortymile Dredging Co. in 1903. Wrecked by ice at Forty Mile, Yukon in 1905.

- Named for Florence E. Nunn Rattenbury (1870-1929, m. 1898, div. 1925), 1st wife of architect Francis M. Rattenbury, a major investor in the BL&KN Co.[25][69]

Florence U.S.A.#121068 1898 San Francisco, California 90 101 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Transferred to the Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Crushed by ice in the St. Michael Canal in 1909.

- Named for Florence Isabelle “Bella” Fleishhacker, née Gerstle (1875–1963), daughter of AC Co. president, Lewis Gerstle.

Florence S U.S.A.#121085 (1898–1900, 1904-1914, & 1938-1952);

Canada #107857 (1900–1904); out of documentation (1914-1938)

1898 St. Michael, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull #6)

100 75 feet Originally owned by Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. Sold to Hoey V. V. Bean in 1899. Sold to Capt. Sydney C. Barrington in 1900. Sold in 1904, possibly to Capt. Wallace Langley. Sold to Kittie M. Hensley by 1907. Wrecked by ice in the Upper Tanana River in the spring of 1914. Superstructure salvaged to make additions to the Hensley residence at Fairbanks, Alaska in 1914. Ms. Hensley died in 1931. Hensley residence moved to Pioneer Park at Fairbanks in 1967. Hull out of documentation, 1914 to 1938. Hull owned by George S. Black and rebuilt into a barge in 1938. Foundered on the Yukon River near Galena, Alaska, in 1952.

- Boat most likely named for Florence S. Starkey (1854-1936), wife of Harry H. Starkey, both investors in the SYT Co.[70]

Flying None by 1917 Operated on the Upper Yukon River. Owned by Tantalus Coal.
Fortune Hunter ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Helen Bruce.
Fulton U.S.A. #121086 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 66 65 feet At Bergman, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26][67] Abandoned in 1902.
General Stewart Van Vliet ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, 1st Rampart.
Glengarry ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Atlinto.
Glenora U.S.A. #86413 (1898–1901);

Canada #107149 (1901–1902)

1898 Tacoma, Washington George W. Barlow 360 126 feet Originally owned the Tacoma-Port Orchard Navigation Co. Sold to R. P. McLennan in 1901. Demolished by fire (arson) near Dawson City, Yukon in 1902.
Gold Star U.S.A. #86440 (1898–1900 & 1902-1906);

Canada #107856 (1900–1902)

1898 St. Michael, Alaska 168 94 feet Originally owned by Gold Star Transportation Co. Sold to Thomas C. Nixon and William Mogridge in 1900. Sold to the Klondyke Corp. and converted to a barge in 1902. Klondyke Corp. liquidated in 1904. Gold Star wrecked at Tanana, Alaska in 1906.
Golden Hind None 1904 Operated on Chena River. Owned by Wilson and Frank H. Stackpole. Wrecked at Fairbanks, Alaska in 1904.
Hamburg U.S.A. #96468 1899 St. Michael, Alaska 24 32 feet Lost in 1899.
Helen Bruce

(Fortune Hunter, 1898-1904)

U.S.A. #201461 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Klondike Promotion Co. (of Chicago, Illinois) 83 62 feet Originally owned by KP Co. (of Chicago). Sold to Minor W. Bruce in 1900. Last inspected in 1904. Registry closed in 1909 or 1910.

- Named for Helen Potter, née Bruce (1898–1988), daughter of Minor W. Bruce.

Idler U.S.A. #209222 1911 Fairbanks, Alaska Fred G. Noyes 98 64 feet Chain driven stern wheel. Originally owned by Fred G. Noyes. Sold to George S. Black, converted to Diesel power, and reduced to 71 gross tons in 1935. To George S. Black Estate in 1953. Abandoned in 1956.
Illinois U.S.A. #100663 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Galesburg-Alaska Mining & Developing Co.[71] 105 75 feet Originally owned by the GAM&D Co.[71] At Alatna River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[67] Sold to the Alaska Commercial Co. in 1899. Converted to a barge in 1900. Transferred to the Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Transferred to the White Pass in 1914. Not used under White Pass ownership. Abandoned at St. Michael in 1927.
Independence U.S.A. #100668 1898 St. Michael, Alaska A. H. Logan 148 80 feet Originally owned by Logan. Sold to Independent Mining Co. in 1899. Sold to Tanana Trading Co. and converted to a wrecking barge in 1905. Resold to North American Transportation & Trading Co., then transferred to the Merchants’ Yukon Transportation Co. in 1906. Sold to Northern Navigation Co. in 1911. Sold to White Pass in 1914. Not used under White Pass ownership. Abandoned in 1917.
Indianapolis U.S.A. #100667 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 96 70 feet Owned by a company of Indiana men. Last inspected in 1899. Registry closed in 1900 or 1901.
Iowa None 1898 Carcross, Yukon Iowa-Alaska Mining Co. 60 feet Owned by the Iowa-Alaska Mining Co. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Retired in 1900.
J. B. Kerr None 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 25 Operated on the Lower Yukon River. Last inspected in 1900. Listed in Jones (1904).
James Deitrick U.S.A. #77315 1898 Elizabeth, New Jersey Crescent Shipyard

(hull #65)

25 50 feet Owned by James Deitrick (1864-d. 1930~1932). At Peavey, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Registry closed in 1903.
James Domville Canada #107154 1898 North Vancouver, British Columbia Alfred Wallace 486 122 feet Originally owned by James Domville.[25] Sold to the Klondike, Yukon & Stewart River Co. in 1898. Wrecked in the “Thirtymile” section of the Yukon River in 1899.
Jennie M U.S.A. #77320 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Crescent Shipyard

(hull #58)

49 70 feet Originally owned by the Philadelphia Exploration & Mining Co. At Alatna River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[67] Owned by Hendricks & Belt in 1903. Sold to Black Transportation Co. and converted to a barge in 1904. Broken up in 1905.

- Named for Jennie M. Hill (1860-1950), wife of PE&M Co. leader, Thomas R. Hill.

Kalamazoo None 1898 Bennett, British Columbia Kalamazoo Mining & Prospecting Co. Operated on Upper Yukon River. Owned by KM&P Co. Foundered at Casey’s Rock, Thirtymile in 1898.
Katie Hemrich ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, 1st Rampart.
Kluhane Canada #126942 1909 Victoria, British Columbia Victoria Machinery Depot

(hull #12)

19 55 feet Owned by Taylor & Drury, Ltd. Retired in 1920.

- Kluhane was derived from a hybrid word, consisting of the Southern Tutchone word for whitefish, plus the Tlingit word for place in which there are.[14][36]

Koakuk

(Cora, until about 1894[72])

None by 1891 35 feet Not known whether stern wheel or screw propeller propulsion. Purchased by William D. “Billy” Moore and Gordon C. Bettles in 1891. Transferred to Bettles alone, and rebuilt about 1894.[72] Operated on the Koyukuk River and Lower Yukon River. Gone after 1897.
1st Koyukuk U.S.A. #161202 1902 Portland, Oregon Joseph Supple 286 121 feet Owned by Northern Navigation Co. Stranded at Little Delta, Alaska, on the Upper Tanana River in 1906.

- Koyukuk was derived from a Yup’ik phrase meaning a generic river. The Koyukuk River was given its generic Yup’ik name by explorer Petr Vasil’evich “Vasilii” Malakhov, because he did not know the local Koyukon name. Local Koyukon name was Yunnaka.[4][73][74]

2nd Koyukuk U.S.A. #203496 1906 St. Michael, Alaska Northern Navigation Co. 248 121 feet Owned by Northern Navigation. Foundered in the Upper Tanana River in 1911.

- Koyukuk was derived from a Yup’ik phrase meaning a generic river. The Koyukuk River was given its generic Yup’ik name by explorer Petr Vasil’evich “Vasilii” Malakhov, because he did not know the local Koyukon name. Local Koyukon name was Yunnaka.[4][73][74]

Lala Lee Collins None 1898 Seattle, Washington 7 Operated on the Lower Yukon River. Sold to Dave Cohn and S. M. Hirsch in 1899. Last inspected in 1900. Listed in Jones (1904).
Leah U.S.A. #141556 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Alaska Commercial Co. 477 139 feet Originally owned by the Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Foundered 40 miles below Kaltag, Alaska in 1906.

- Named for Leah Shingleberger (1826–1900), mother-in-law of AC Co. vice president Capt. Gustave F. Niebaum.[5]

Leota U.S.A. #141541 1898 Alameda, California Daniel G. McKenzie 37 51 feet Originally owned by Alameda & Alaska Mining & Trading Co. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Sold to G. W. Chase in 1899. Purchased by Northern Navigation Co. in 1906 or 1907. Sold to Horton & Moore Co. in 1911 or 1912. Stranded near Fairbanks, Alaska in 1920.
Lieut. Smith

(Argo, 1898–1903 or 1904)

U.S.A. #107357 1898 Stockton, California Jarvis & Son 44 60 feet Originally owned by Cleveland-Alaska Gold Mining & Milling Co. At Alatna River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[67] Sold to the U.S. Army in 1899. Resold in 1905.

- Named for 1st Lt. William H. Smith (1860-1898), killed at the Battle of San Juan Hill.

Linderman Canada #107519 1898 Bennett, British Columbia Carroll Johnson & Co. 54 40 feet Operated on Bennett Lake. Originally owned by Capt. John Irving. Sold to the Northern Lakes & Rivers Navigation Co. in 1899. Later in 1899, it foundered in Whitehorse Rapids.

- Lindeman Lake named for Dr. Moritz K. A. Lindeman (1823–1908), secretary to the Bremen Geographical Society.[15]

Little Delta U.S.A. #208038 1905 Fairbanks, Alaska 71 67 feet Owned by Cyrus B. Atwell. Laid up at Iditarod, Alaska. Registry closed in 1926 or 1927.

- Named for the river deltas formed in the Tanana River, downstream from the mouth of the Little Delta River. The name Little Delta River contains the word Little to differentiate the river from nearby Big Delta River.[31]

Little Snug U.S.A. #208263 1910 Fairbanks, Alaska 50 59 feet Owned by Amos J. Tucker. Registry closed in 1919 or 1920.
Lizzie B None 1898 New York, New York 4 Operated on the Lower Yukon River. Last inspected in 1900. Listed in Jones (1904).
Lois U.S.A. #208826 1910 Fairbanks, Alaska 49 58 feet Registry closed in 1914 or 1915.
Loreli U.S.A. #141598 (1896–1899);

Canada #107940 (1899–1920)

1896 Portland, Oregon 32 50 feet Rebuilt by Joseph Supple for Daly & Co. (Skagway, Alaska) in 1898. Sold to George Findlay in 1900. Resold to Edward W. G. "Ted" Tennant in 1901. Resold to John Leech in 1902. Registry closed in 1920.
Lorenda U.S.A. #141568 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 49 50 feet Abandoned in 1898.
Los Angeles U.S.A. #141569 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 29 48 feet At Bergman, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Last inspected in 1903. Listed in Jones (1904). Registry closed in 1908 or 1909.
Lotta Talbot U.S.A. #141551 1898 Seattle, Washington Richard A. Talbot 342 146 feet Originally owned by British-American Steamship Co. (Frank Waterhouse, Ltd.). Sold to the Alaska Meat Co. in 1899. Alaska Meat became Pacific Cold Storage Co. in 1900. Boat sold to Waechter Bros. in 1905 or 1906. Demolished by fire at Fairbanks, Alaska in 1906.

- Named for Lotta Talbot (1889–1971), daughter of Richard A.

Luella U.S.A. #141540 1898 Stockton, California Jarvis & Son 115 65 feet Originally owned by a company from Chicago, Illinois, headed by C. M. Hamilton. At Bergman, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26][67] Sold to the Alaska Commercial Co. in 1900. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Stranded near Chena, Alaska in 1910.
Lully C ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Alameda.
Mabel C U.S.A. #92984 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 74 58 feet Purchased by U.S. Army in 1900. Gone in 1902 or 1903.
Marathon None 1909 Fairbanks, Alaska Side wheels. Broken up in 1909.
Marie F None by 1913 Side wheels. Operated on the Lower Yukon River. Owned by Capt. George C. “Charles” Finger.

- Named for Mary R. Finger (1865-1945), wife of “Charles.”

Marjorie Canada #107248 1898 New Westminster, British Columbia Oliver Bigney 20 37 feet Originally owned by Teslin Transportation Co. Sold to Henry C. Lisle by 1907. Abandoned in 1914.
Martha Clow U.S.A. #92859 1898 Stockton, California Jarvis & Son 98

(52, 1898-1908)

81 feet

(65 feet, 1898–1908)

Originally owned by the Charles R. Clow Expedition, from Chicago, Illinois. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Mr. Clow left Alaska in 1900. Boat sold to Mr. Willett in 1905. Sold to Capt. George C. “Charles” Finger in 1907 or 1908. Sold to George Mutchler between 1917 & 1922. Abandoned in 1925 or 1926.

- Named for Martha M. Douglas, née Clow (1894-1990), niece of Charles R. Clow.

May D U.S.A. #92853 1898 San Francisco, California 67 62 feet Originally owned by Alaska Exploration Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Sold to M. E. Dawson in 1902. Sold to Henry M. H. Bolander between 1910 & 1912. Abandoned in 1925 or 1926.
Messenger None 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 9 Owned by the Yukon Gold Dredge Co. Last inspected in 1898. At Soo City, Alaska, on the South Fork of the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26]
Michigan None 1898 Bennett, British Columbia 24 feet Not known whether stern wheel or screw propeller propulsion.
Milwaukee U.S.A. #92865 1898 Ballard, Washington 396 136 feet Originally owned by the Milwaukee-Alaska Gold-Dredge Mining Co. Sold to the British-American Steamship Co. (Frank Waterhouse, Ltd.) in 1899. Resold to the Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. in 1900. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Sold between 1908 & 1912. Abandoned in 1924 or 1925.
Monarch

(informally known as “Clara Monarch” after 1900)

Canada #107863 1898 San Francisco, California Matthew Turner 284 120 feet Originally owned by Fernand de Journal. Engines from the Clara (U.S.A. #127249) installed in 1900. Sold to Dominic Burns in 1902. Resold to George S. Wilkins in 1903. Foundered at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1904.

- Not to be confused with Monarch, U.S.A. #92855, owned by White Pass, above.

Mono Canada #107102 1898 Stikine River, British Columbia Frank P. Armstrong and A. E. Henderson 278 120 feet Owned by Teslin Transportation Co. Demolished by fire (arson) near Dawson City, Yukon in 1902.
Nabesna U.S.A. #222522 1922 Fairbanks, Alaska 73 65 feet Owned by Clarence D. Flanagan. Abandoned in 1929 or 1930.

- Nabesna is the name of a river, and was derived from an Ahtna phrase of otherwise unknown meaning.[4][15][51]

Nenana U.S.A. #223315 1922 Nenana, Alaska 8 40 feet Originally owned by Charles W. Smith. Sold to John H. Bailey in 1925 or 1926. Abandoned in 1937 or 1938.

- Nenana was derived from a Lower Tanana phrase, which means stopping-while-migrating river. Looks like a contraction or an idiom, because it literally appears to mean something less, such as land by the river.[33][60]

New Racket U.S.A. #130228 1882 San Francisco, California Edward L. Schieffelin 20 42 feet Originally owned by Schieffelin. Sold to Arthur Harper, Capt. Alfred H. Mayo, and LeRoy N. “Jack” McQuesten in 1883. Sold to the Alaska Commercial Co. in 1894. Retired in 1895. Wrecked by ice on the Koyukuk River in 1897.
Niagara Canada #107158 1898 Vancouver, British Columbia 39 40 feet Owned by John F. “Jack” Walker. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Broken up in 1899.
Nora Canada #103915 1898 Wheaton River, Yukon Bennett Lake & Klondyke Navigation Co. 67 80 feet Originally owned by the BL&KN Co. Transferred to the Klondyke Corp. in 1900. Broken up in 1902.

- Named for Florence E. Nunn Rattenbury (1870-1929, m. 1898, div. 1925), 1st wife of architect Francis M. Rattenbury, a major investor in the BL&KN Co.[25][69]

North Star U.S.A. #130770 1898 San Francisco, California 28 46 feet Owned by North Star Mining Co. At Alatna River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[67] Abandoned on the Koyukuk River in 1904 or 1905.
1st Northern Light U.S.A. #130789 1896 St. Michael, Alaska 10 40 feet Built by Union Iron Works for the Episcopal Church. Foundered in the Koyukuk River in 1904.
2nd Northern Light U.S.A. #212575 1914 Tanana, Alaska 12 41 feet Registry closed in 1919 or 1920.
Nugget None 1898 Bergman, Alaska 5 Operated on the Lower Yukon River. Foundered at Nome, Alaska in 1899.
Nunivak U.S.A. #200528 1898 San Francisco, California Union Iron Works 486 180 feet Originally owned by U.S. Revenue Cutter Service. Sold to W. D. Hofius & Co. (dealer) in 1902. Sold to the North American Transportation & Trading Co. in 1905. Crushed by ice at Nenana, Alaska in 1909.

- Nunivak was derived from a Yup’ik phrase, which may mean big land.[15][50]

Olive May Canada #107514 1897 Bennett, British Columbia Albert S. Kerry 54 60 feet Originally owned by Kerry. Sold to Bennett Lake & Klondyke Navigation Co. in 1899. BL&KN Co. intended to rename it Dora, but it remained Olive May. Transferred to Klondyke Corp. in 1900. Resold to Nathaniel B. Raymond in 1901. Resold to L. Roy by 1904. Firebox used to cremate an unknown deceased miner at Tagish, Yukon in 1900. This event was conflated into the poem The Cremation of Sam McGee by Robert W. Service in 1907; the poem renamed the unknown miner “Sam McGee,” renamed the Olive May “Alice May,” and relocated the event to “Lake LeBarge.” Olive May broken up in 1908.

- Named for Olive May Kerry (1891–1970), daughter of Albert S.[25]

Ora Canada #103914 1898 Wheaton River, Yukon Bennett Lake & Klondyke Navigation Co. 69 95 feet

(80 feet, 1898-1900)

Originally owned by the BL&KN Co. Transferred to the Klondyke Corp. in 1900. Converted to a barge and sold to Five Finger Coal Co. in 1902. Sold to Fortymile Dredging Co. in 1903. Wrecked by ice at Forty Mile, Yukon in 1905.

- Named for Florence E. Nunn Rattenbury (1870-1929, m. 1898, div. 1925), 1st wife of architect Francis M. Rattenbury, a major investor in the BL&KN Co.[25][69]

Pauline Canada #116611 1907 Whitehorse, Yukon Nathaniel B. Raymond 145 86 feet Originally owned by Stewart River Navigation Co. Sold to the Side Streams Navigation Co. in 1909. Wrecked by ice at Dawson City, Yukon in 1915.

- Named for Pauline E. Dow, née Raymond (1898-1978), daughter of Nathaniel.

Pelly None Operated on the Yukon River about 1895, as far upstream (south) as the mouth of the Pelly River.
Philip B. Low ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Eldorado.
Pioneer U.S.A. #222523 1922 Fairbanks, Alaska 14 41 feet Owned by George S. Black. Abandoned in 1930 or 1931.
Potlach U.S.A. #150793 1898 Racine, Wisconsin 18 35 feet Owned by Frederick J. Currier. Stranded off the Chena River in 1900.
Pup U.S.A. #201964 1905 Ballard, Washington Chindern [?] 33 54 feet Owned by Capt. Wallace Langley and John E. Green by 1909. Sold to William P. McKeague, Harvey Watson, and Roy Henderson in 1913. Abandoned in 1935 or 1936.

- Pup is a term that was current during the Klondike Gold Rush. A pup is a small second order stream (one which is formed by the confluence of two first order streams), and which is also a tributary to yet another stream. Usually, they flow down gulches on the sides of a valley, into the creek at the bottom of the valley.

Quick Canada #107861 1900 Dawson City, Yukon Edward J. Smythe 67 60 feet Originally owned by the Stewart River Navigation Co. Sold to Thomas Smith in 1905. Resold to Capt. A. F. Daughtry and George Waltenberg in 1908. Registry closed in 1914.
Quickstep U.S.A. #20617 1898 Seattle, Washington 343 124 feet Sold to Adelbert E. Claflin in 1899. Sold to John S. Segers in 1903. Sold to the Kuskokwim Commercial Co. in 1905. Sold to the Alaska Rivers Navigation Co. in 1918. Abandoned in 1938.
1st Rampart

(Katie Hemrich, 1898–1900; General Stewart Van Vliet, 1900-1905)

U.S.A. #161108 1898 Seattle, Washington C. N. Patterson 248 121 feet Originally owned by the Yukon Gold Dredge Co. At Seaforth, Alaska, on the South Fork of the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Sold to U.S. Army in 1900. Resold to the Northern Navigation Co. in 1905. Converted to Barge Van Vliet in 1906. Gone by 1913.

- Originally named for Katherine A. “Katie” Scruby, née Hemrich (1891-1969), daughter of Seattle brewer Andrew Hemrich. Boat later renamed for the 20-mile canyon, located 7 to 27 miles northeast (upstream) of Tanana, through which the Yukon River flows.[15][31]

2nd Rampart Canada #116615 1914 Dawson City, Yukon Alphonse Geoffrey 5 43 feet Owned by Daniel Cadzow. Registry closed in 1936.

- Name describes the 20-mile canyon, located 7 to 27 miles northeast (upstream) of Tanana, through which the Yukon River flows.[15][31]

Redlands U.S.A. #111178 1898 San Francisco, California 14 50 feet Originally owned by Redlands-Alaska Mining Co. For sale in 1899.[65] Listed in Jones (1904). Registry closed in 1913 or 1914.
Reindeer Canada #107099 1898 Victoria, British Columbia Thomas H. Trahey 358 121 feet Originally owned by the Yukon & Hootalinqua Navigation Co. At Dall River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899.[19] Sold to British-America Corp. in 1899. Demolished by fire at Five Finger Rapids, Yukon in 1900.
Research U.S.A. #202298 1898 Liverpool, United Kingdom 45 60 feet Originally owned by Klondyke Research Syndicate (of England). At Red Mountain Creek on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Sold to Capt. Walter H. Ferguson in 1900. Owned by Edward C. Loomis in 1905. Sold to Louis L. Lane in 1911. Foundered at the Nixon-Takotna Fork, Alaska in 1911.
Robert Kerr U.S.A. #111180 1898 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros.

(hull #32)

718 176 feet Originally owned by the British-American Steamship Co. (Frank Waterhouse, Ltd.). Sold to the Alaska Meat Co. in 1899. Alaska Meat became Pacific Cold Storage Co. in 1900. Boat resold to Waechter Bros. in 1919. Abandoned in 1934 or 1935.

- May have been named for the former barque Robert Kerr (1866), which had become famous as a refuge from the Great Vancouver Fire of 1886, and which was reduced to a barge two years later.

Rock Island U.S.A. #111177 1898 Seattle, Washington Kahlke Bros. 533 134 feet Originally owned by Rock Island Alaska Mining Co. Sold to the Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. in 1899. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Cut by ice at Chena, Alaska in 1906.

- Named after the Rock Island Alaska Mining Co.

Rock Island No. 2 U.S.A. #111187 1898 Seattle, Washington Kahlke Bros. 333 100 feet Originally owned by Rock Island Alaska Mining Co. Sold to the Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. and converted to a barge in 1899. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Sold to the White Pass in 1914. Wrecked by ice at Nenana, Alaska in 1918.

- Named after the Rock Island Alaska Mining Co.

Ruth Canada #107518 1898 Bennett, British Columbia James H. Calvert 52 50 feet Originally owned by Capt. John Irving. Sold to the Northern Lakes & Rivers Navigation Co. in 1899. Resold to the Atlin Transportation Co. in 1900. Demolished by fire on Atlin Lake in 1902.
St. James U.S.A. #116857 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 63 70 feet Crew was from St. James, Minnesota. At the Hogatza River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[68] Foundered at Anvik, Alaska in 1899.
St. Joseph U.S.A. #116863 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 69 96 feet Originally owned by the Catholic Church (Holy Cross Mission). Sold to Ira F. Wood in 1929 or 1930. Abandoned in 1943.
St. Michael U.S.A. #115674 1879 San Francisco, California 28 49 feet Originally owned by Western Fur & Trading Co. WF&T Co. sold out to the Alaska Commercial Co. in 1883. Boat sold to the Catholic Church (Holy Cross Mission) in 1884. Resold to Elbridge T. “E.T.” Barnette, et. al. in 1897. Resold to Capt. W. H. Geiger in 1898. At Dall River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899.[19] Laid up in 1920.

- Village of St. Michael, Alaska named for Vice Admiral Mikhail D. Tebenkov (1802–1872), governor of Russian America.[15][31][32]

Samson U.S.A. #208262 1910 Fairbanks, Alaska Raymond Brumbaugh, Henry C. Hamilton & Edward E. Kellogg 272 85 feet Owned by Lemuel J. “Joe” Heacock. Wrecked in the Upper Tanana River in 1916.
Seattle No. 1 U.S.A. #116853 1897 St. Michael, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull No. 4)

445 148 feet Originally owned by Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. Converted to a barge in 1900. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Sold to the White Pass in 1918. Later in 1918, it was wrecked by ice at St. Marys, Alaska.
Selma U.S.A. #217327 1918 Ruby, Alaska 27 48 feet Owned by Edward D. Simon. Abandoned in 1932 or 1933.

- Named for Selma J. Simon (1860-1927), wife of Edward D.

Sen. W. B. Allison U.S.A. #116858 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 10 50 feet At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Registry closed in 1902 or 1903.
Shamrock None Originally, steam power. Obtained by Klondike Airways about 1929. Subsequently, converted to gasoline power-stern wheel. Retired in 1938.
Shusana U.S.A. #211609 1913 Fairbanks, Alaska 49 80 feet Originally owned by Edward J. Hackett. Sold to the Alaska Rivers Navigation Co. in 1914. Stranded near Nenana, Alaska in 1920.

- Shusana was derived from an Ahtna phrase, which means copper creek. Not a reference to Copper River.[51]

Silver Wave U.S.A. #116749 1896 Moline, Illinois 7 38 feet Sold to the Galesburg-Alaska Mining & Development Co. and shipped from Illinois in 1898.[71] At Holy Cross, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[67] Abandoned in 1899.
Sovereign U.S.A. #116813 1898 Ballard, Washington Thomas C. Reed 326 126 feet Owned by the Columbia Navigation Co. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Wrecked at Nome, Alaska in 1904.
Starkey ...... 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Moran Bros.

(hull #7)

93 Owned by the Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. Sank when launched.

- Named for Harry H. Starkey (1857-1902), an investor in the SYT Co.[70]

Sunflower U.S.A. #116848 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 57 60 feet Owned by a company headed by a Mr. Donohue. At Alatna River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[67] For sale in 1899.[65] Foundered on the Snake River in 1900.
T. J. Nestor U.S.A. #145792 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 95 72 feet Last inspected in 1899. Registry closed in 1899 or 1900.

- Named for Thomas J. Nestor (1862-1943).

Tana U.S.A. #201820 1905 Seattle, Washington 234 106 feet Originally, gasoline power-stern wheel and owned by Capt. Wallace Langley. Converted to steam power in 1906. Sold to Alaska Rivers Navigation Co. in 1933. Abandoned in 1940.

- Tana was derived from an Ahtna phrase, which means “bagged-object-is-in-position” river.[4][51] Most likely, a contraction or an idiom.[60]

Tanana Chief U.S.A. #145795 1898 Unalaska, Alaska Theodore L. Morgan et al. 72 59 feet Built by Morgan et al. (of St. Paul, Minnesota) for their own use. Sold to Hendricks & Belt in 1899. Stranded on Kantishna River in 1906.

- Tanana derived from a Lower Tanana phrase, which is not the name of the Tanana River, but is the name of the village. Means river trail.[4][15][33]

Teddy H U.S.A. #208307 1910 Fairbanks, Alaska Lemuel J. “Joe” Heacock 153 74 feet Originally owned by Heacock. Heacock died in 1919. Boat sold to Sam Dubin by 1920. Foundered near Nenana, Alaska in 1930.

- Named for Edwin C. Heacock (1861-1927), brother of “Joe.”

Tetlin U.S.A. #208036 1908 Fairbanks, Alaska 65 61 feet Owned by Theadore Kettleson. Wrecked, 10 miles above the mouth of the Nabesna River in 1923.

- Tetlin was derived from an Upper Tanana term which means current flows.[4]

Thomas Dwyer U.S.A. #145407 1885 Sacramento, California John W. Rock 73 87 feet Originally owned by the Sacramento Transportation Co. Sold to California & Alaska Navigation & Commercial Co. in 1897. Sold to W. J. McDowell in 1899. Registry closed in 1916 or 1917.

- Named for Capt. Thomas Dwyer (1835-1890).

Tosi None about 1924 50 Operated on Lower Yukon River. Owned by the Catholic Church (Holy Cross Mission).

- Named for Father Pascal Tosi (1837–1898).[75]

Unity None 1898 Seattle, Washington 10 Not known whether stern wheel or screw propeller propulsion. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[68] Last inspected in 1899.
Victoria U.S.A. #161820 1897 St. Michael, Alaska Matthew Turner 55 75 feet Originally owned by Alaska Commercial Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Sold to George A. Fredericks in 1908 or 1909. Abandoned at St. Michael, Alaska in 1924 or 1925.
Victorian Canada #107520 1898 Bennett, British Columbia James H. Calvert 50 56 feet Originally owned by Capt. John Irving. Sold to the Northern Lakes & Rivers Navigation Co. in 1899. Later in 1899, it was broken up at Bennett Lake.
Viola None 1898 Bennett, British Columbia 4 30 feet Operated on the Upper Yukon River.
Vivian Canada #107251 1898 Bennett, British Columbia James H. Calvert 52 50 feet Originally owned by Capt. John Irving. Sold to the Northern Lakes & Rivers Navigation Co. in 1899. Later in 1899, it was wrecked at Dawson City, Yukon.
W. H. Evans U.S.A. #81599 1898 Ballard, Washington 729 183 feet Owned by the Lewis-Klondike Expedition Co. (of Baltimore, Maryland). At Dall River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899.[19] Broken up at Yukon Flats, Alaska in 1900.

- Named for William H. Evans, investor in the LKE Co.

W. K. Merwin U.S.A. #80959 1883 Seattle, Washington Capt. Willard K. Merwin 229 108 feet Originally owned by Capt. Merwin. Sold to the Washington Steamboat Co. in 1886. Resold to the Alaska Commercial Co. in 1897. Foundered near Nome, Alaska in 1899.

- Named for Capt. Willard K. Merwin (1853-1932).

W. S. Stratton U.S.A. #81623 1898 Seattle, Washington James Casey 94 75 feet Owned by Alec McDonald. Foundered near Selkirk, Yukon in 1899.

- Named for Winfield S. Stratton (1848-1902), gold king of Cripple Creek, Colorado, who financed the boat.

W. Seig None by 1898 Not known whether stern wheel or screw propeller propulsion. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Wrecked in a storm at St. Michael, Alaska in 1899.[76]
Weona U.S.A. #81624 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 27 40 feet Last inspected in 1898. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. For sale in 1899.[65] Registry closed in 1903 or 1904.

- Weona is a Seneca term which means where only good prevails.

Wilder None 1866 San Francisco, California 60 feet Owned by Western Union Extension Co. In 1866 or 1867, it became the first powered vessel to operate on the Yukon River. Definitely operated on the Lower Yukon River in 1867.

- Named for Samuel Wilder (1824–1902), a director of the Western Union Telegraph Co.

Willie Irving Canada #103918 1898 Bennett, British Columbia Joseph Supple 102 80 feet Originally owned by John Irving. Sold to Ed McConnell, Capt. Edward M. Barrington, and C. H. Hamilton in 1898. Barrington died, and Willie Irving sold to Charles F. Griffith, N. Allen, N. Cowan, D. H. Dwyer, and C. H. Hamilton in 1899. Wrecked by ice near Selkirk, Yukon in 1899.

- Named for William A. Irving (1886-1916, k.i.a. World War I), son of John Irving.

1st Yukon U.S.A. #27623 1883 St. Michael, Alaska 21 70 feet Built by Alaska Commercial Co. for its own use. At Bergman, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26][67] Wrecked by ice on the Koyukuk River in 1901.

- For remarks relating to the name Yukon, see, Remarks for 2nd Yukon, U.S.A. #165172, under White Pass and Yukon Route, above.

Zodiac None 1898 Seattle, Washington 5 Operated on the Lower Yukon River, at least from 1904 to 1910.
Misc. Yukon River Steam PowerScrew Propeller Boats
Name[1] Registry (-ies) Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Alaska U.S.A. #107458 1899 Seattle, Washington Moran Bros. 60 74 feet Originally owned by Empire Transportation Co. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Demolished by fire at Winter Quarters in 1906.

- Alaska was derived from an Aleut idiom, which figuratively refers to the mainland of Alaska. Literally, it means object to which the action of the sea is directed.[3][4]

Alert Canada #107515 1898 Lindeman, British Columbia G. Milne 9 34 feet Operated on Lindeman Lake. Owned by John J. McKenna. Registry closed in 1919.
Alpha U.S.A. #107404 (1898–1899);

Canada #107924 (1899-1920)

1898 Seattle, Washington 10 38 feet Originally owned by Arthur R. Auston. At the Hogatza River, Alaska during the winter of 1898-1899.[68] Sold to Lewis McLachlan in 1902. Out of commission and registry closed in 1920.
Aquila None 1889 Bristol, Rhode Island Herreschoff Mfg. Co.

(hull #157)

48 feet Originally owned by William Randolph Hearst. Sold in 1895. Resold to Capt. Edward M. Barrington in February 1898. Operated on the Upper Yukon River in 1898. Bent its propeller at Forty Mile, Yukon in September 1898. Barrington died in 1899. Boat broken up in 1900.

- Aquila is the Italian word for eagle.

Argonaut U.S.A. #107403 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Ildo Ransdell 15 50 feet Originally owned by Alaska Exploration Co. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Transferred to Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Wrecked at Stewart, Yukon in 1912.
Blair of Athol Canada #111608 1900 New Westminster, British Columbia Joseph G. “Scottie” Morrison 11 54 feet Operated on Atlin Lake. Originally owned by Morrison. Sold to Margaret Ward in 1902. Resold to the Northern Lumber Co. in 1904. Blown ashore in 1906.
Comet None 1899 Shakan, Alaska 4 Eventually owned by Capt. Norron. Existed in 1902.
Concord U.S.A. #127306 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 11 46 feet Owned by Henry C. Lassen. May have been at Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Registry closed in 1903 or 1904.
Dawson City ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Gussie Brown.
Eclipse None 1898 St. Michael, Alaska Gloucester Mining Co. 35 50 feet Owned by the GM Co. At Union City, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Wrecked by ice at Nulato, Alaska in 1899.
El Sueno U.S.A. #136625 1894 Alameda, California Joseph A. Leonard 23 44 feet Originally a sloop, owned by Joseph A. Leonard. Sold to El Sueño de Oro Mining & Transportation Co. (of San Francisco, California) in 1897. Converted to a steam power-screw propeller in 1898. At Dall River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899.[19][77] Sold to Victor W. J. Kloppenberg & Lord in 1899. Foundered off Nome, Alaska, in 1903.

- Sueño is the Spanish word for dream. El sueño de oro means the dream of gold.

Empire U.S.A. #136674 1898 Elizabeth, New Jersey Crescent Shipyard

(hull #56)

115 85 feet First tunnel boat to operate on the Yukon River.[78] Originally owned by Empire Transportation Co. Transferred to the Northern Navigation Co. in 1901. Registry closed in 1907 or 1908.
Gertrude U.S.A. #86423 1898 New Whatcom, Washington A. L. Walsh 17 39 feet Originally owned by Little Rhody-Alaska Mining & Transportation Co. Abandoned in 1922 or 1923.
Gladys Canada #107722 1899 Jersey City, New Jersey Marine Vapor Engine Co. 9 45 feet External combustion, but originally used alcohol vapor instead of steam as the working fluid. Originally owned by the North-West Mounted Police. The NWMP became the Royal Northwest Mounted Police in 1904. Boat converted to steam power in 1906. Sold to Pine Creek Power Co. in 1910. Sold to the Inland Trading Co. in 1914. Abandoned at Atlin, British Columbia in 1930. Remains still at Atlin.

- Named for Jean Gladys Perry (1887-1972), daughter of Aylesworth Bowen Perry, commander of the NWMP in the Yukon from 1899 to 1900 (Reg. #O.44).

Gold Hunter None 1898 Alameda, California 4 At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Last inspected in 1904.
Gov. Stoneman U.S.A. #86081 1885 Sacramento, California 15 44 feet Originally owned by California State Fish Commission. Out of commission from 1892 or 1893 until 1897 (including about 6 months at the bottom of the Sacramento River).[79] Sold to M. Nixon Kimball and L. Stuart Upson in 1897. Wrecked in a storm near Nome, Alaska in 1900.
Gussie Brown

(Dawson City, 1898-1903)

U.S.A. #157508 1898 San Francisco, California Stone & Wilson 119 83 feet Originally owned by the Alaska Mining & Transportation Co. Sold to Joseph Gawley by 1925. Abandoned in 1926 or 1927.
1st Herbert None 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 5 Operated on the Lower Yukon River. Possibly, owned by George M. Pilcher.[80] Last inspected in 1902. Listed in Jones (1904).
2nd Herbert U.S.A. #203375 1906 Anvik, Alaska 12 30 feet Owned by George M. Pilcher.[81] Registry closed in 1919 or 1920.
Hettie B U.S.A. #96278 1894 San Francisco, California 27 43 feet Originally a sloop with an auxiliary gasoline engine and screw propeller, and owned by John A. McNear. Sold to Alaska-Yukon Transportation Co. in 1897. Converted to steam power-screw propeller in 1898. May have been at Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Converted back to gasoline power in 1902. Eventually owned by George D. Schofield. Stranded at Safety Lagoon, Alaska in 1919.
Jessie Canada #107721 1899 Jersey City, New Jersey Marine Vapor Engine Co. 9 45 feet External combustion, but used alcohol vapor instead of steam as the working fluid. Originally owned by the North-West Mounted Police. The NWMP became the Royal Northwest Mounted Police in 1904. Boat sold to A. J. W. Bridgeman and R. Greenwood in 1908. Registry closed in 1920.

- Named for Jessie E. Perry (1886-1974), daughter of Aylesworth Bowen Perry, commander of the NWMP in the Yukon from 1899 to 1900 (Reg. #O.44).

Joe Mathews U.S.A. #77286 1898 Everett, Washington 46 46 feet Owned by Cascade Development Co. At Arctic City, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Stranded at Cape Nome, Alaska in 1899. In 1906, hull rebuilt, reduced from 46 to 19 gross tons, and converted to gasoline power. Eventually owned by J. Myron Haley. Stranded at Cape Darby, Alaska in 1910.

- Named for Joseph R. “Joe” Mathews (1865–1935), Alaska steamboat pilot.[72]

Little Jim None 1898 Carcross, Yukon Iowa-Alaska Mining Co. Owned by the IAM Co. At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899.
Mabel F Canada #107259 1898 Bennett, British Columbia C. Kersting 10 40 feet Originally owned by John M. Flower. Sold to Edward W. G. "Ted" Tennant in 1902. Resold to P. H. Johnson by 1906. Resold to Matthew Watson in 1918 or 1919. Resold to John Williams in 1924. Registry closed in 1948. Scuttled in Nares Lake, Yukon in 1950.
Mariam None 1897 Seattle, Washington [launch] Owned by North American Transportation & Trading Co. Foundered near Stuart Island, Alaska in 1899.
Marie Balmer U.S.A. #208035 1910 St. Michael, Alaska 9 54 feet Originally gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Edwin H. Flynn. Converted to steam power in 1913 or 1914. Abandoned in 1922 or 1923.
Rebecca None 1898 Brooklyn, New York U.S. Navy Yard, New York 7 Owned by U.S. Government. Operated on the Lower Yukon River beginning in 1898. Last inspected in 1907.
Sirene None 1894 Nyack, New York 4 At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. For sale in 1899.[65] Last inspected in 1900. Listed in Jones (1904).
Tagish None 1899 Jersey City, New Jersey Marine Vapor Engine Co. 28 feet External combustion, but used alcohol vapor instead of steam as the working fluid. Originally owned by the North-West Mounted Police. The NWMP became the Royal Northwest Mounted Police in 1904. Boat sold to the British Columbia Government in 1908.

- Tagish is a shortened version of Taagish Tóo’e’, which is the Tagish name for the Tagish River.[82] The longer version translates to the water that appears when it is breaking up ["it" being spring ice].[83]

Wm. McKinley None 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 5 At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899.[65] Wrecked in a storm at St. Michael in 1899.[76]
Wm. Ogilvie Canada #107527 1899 Bennett, British Columbia James B. Colvin 82 63 feet Originally owned by Teslin Yukon Steam Navigation Co. Sold to Harry E. Brown in 1912. Resold to the Inland Trading Co. in 1913. Abandoned at Taku City, British Columbia in 1938.
Winthrop None 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 7 At Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. For sale in 1899.[65] Last inspected in 1900. Listed in Jones (1904).
Witch Hazel None by 1894 Bridal Veil, Oregon 27 feet Owned by Frank D. Atkins and Edward L. Bushnell. Operated on the Upper Yukon River in 1894 and 1895. Abandoned near Hootalinqua in 1895. Revived and travelled downriver in 1898. Hull last reported to be at Ft. Cudahy, Yukon.

- Witch Hazel, Oregon was (and is) a small community about 44 miles from Bridal Veil, and near the home of a person named Frank Atkins. The witch hazel plant is not native to Oregon.

Wyvern Canada #107160 1898 Dartmouth, United Kingdom 8 45 feet Owned by Edward M. Bruce. Wrecked on the Snake River, Yukon in 1900.
Yellow Kid Canada #107258 1898 Lindeman, British Columbia 3 29 feet Owned by F. Porter Worsnop. Wrecked and abandoned in 1920.
Yukon[84] U.S.A. #27578 1869 San Francisco, California John W. Gates 20 49 feet Originally owned by Parrott & Co. Parrott & Co. was absorbed by the Alaska Commercial Co. in 1870. Wrecked by ice at Ft. Yukon, Alaska in 1880.

- For remarks relating to the name Yukon, see, Remarks for 2nd Yukon, U.S.A. #165172, under White Pass and Yukon Route, above.

Misc. Yukon River Gas and Diesel Boats, 1900-1954[64]
Name[1] Registry (-ies) Year Built Where Built Builder Volume (gross tons)[2] Hull Length Remarks
Admiral

(Claude B. Hanthorn, 1896- 1905)

U.S.A. #127123 1896 Seattle, Washington 35 58 feet Originally, gasoline power-screw propeller and owned by James O. Hanthorn. Converted to steam power in 1899 or 1900. Converted back to gasoline power in 1905. Stranded at Andreafsky, Alaska later in 1905.

- Named for Claude B. Hanthorn (1876-1948), son of James O.

Agulleit U.S.A. #214487 1916 Hastings, Alaska 16 42 feet Originally, gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Northern Commercial Co. Converted to Diesel power in 1954. Destroyed by ice at Emmonak, Alaska in 1971.

- Agulleit possibly derived from Aleut or Alutiiq word for hawk.[85]

Alatna U.S.A. #210645 1912 Fairbanks, Alaska Edmund Marson 10 64 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Edmund Marson. Abandoned in 1936 or 1937.

- Alatna was derived from a Koyukon term of unknown meaning.[4][31]

Anna E U.S.A. #107603 1900 St. Michael, Alaska 17 60 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Gone by 1901.
2nd Atlinto None 1911 Atlin, British Columbia Jules Eggert 41 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Jules Eggert. Inherited by Paul Eggert in 1922. Sold to John Noland in 1927. Ran until the 1950s. Subsequently, donated to Atlin Historical Society. On display at Atlin.

- Atlinto was derived from a hybrid word, consisting of the Tlingit word for big lake, plus the Tagish word for water: literally, big lake water.[14][36][66] In turn, the name Atlinto River literally means big lake water river.

Bertha U.S.A. #222524 1922 Fairbanks, Alaska 14 53 feet Gasoline power-stern wheel. Originally owned by George C. Moody. Sold to George S. Black in 1933 or 1934. Abandoned in 1937 or 1938.

- Named for Bertha C. Moody (1871-1957), wife of George C.

Bessie D U.S.A. #222525 1922 Tanana, Alaska 21 50 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Edwin P. Allard. Abandoned in 1932 or 1933.
Bonnie G U.S.A. #265321 1941 Big Delta, Alaska 46 60 feet Diesel power-stern wheel. Originally owned by Donald A. Peterson. Peterson died in 1967. Registry closed between 1981 & 1988.
Carrier U.S.A. #208125 1908 San Francisco, California 6 30 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Northern Commercial Co. Destroyed by fire in 1915.
Chetco U.S.A. #126409 1887 Benecia, California 103 84 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Originally owned by J. S. Kimball & Co. Sold to Luther H. Griffith in 1897. Registry closed in 1903 or 1904.

- Chetco was derived from a Chetco metaphor,[34] which literally means at the tail, and figuratively refers to at the mouth of a river.[4]

Claude B. Hanthorn ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Admiral.
Dan U.S.A. #207507 1910 Seattle, Washington 13 60 feet Gasoline power-stern wheel. Owned by Jack Dobler in 1913. Owned by Capt. George C. “Charles” Finger by 1925. Abandoned in 1927 or 1928.
Danaco No. 1 U.S.A. #226606 1927 Houghton, Washington 14 62 feet Diesel power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Day Navigation Co. Sold to Harry Donnelley in 1944. Sold to Kuskokwim Transportation Co. in 1949. Sold to Northern Transportation & Equipment Co. in 1951. Sold to Alaska Towing & Salvage Co. between 1952 & 1954. Abandoned between 1965 & 1967.

- Danaco is an acronym for Day Navigation Co.

Danaco No. 2 U.S.A. #226607 1927 Houghton, Washington 11 62 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Day Navigation Co. Sold to Harry Donnelley in 1944. Abandoned in 1956.

- Danaco is an acronym for Day Navigation Co.

Danaco No. 7 U.S.A. #233723 1935 Houghton, Washington 14 60 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Day Navigation Co. Sold to Harry Donnelley in 1944. Sold to George S. Black Estate in 1956. Sold to Yutana Barge Lines, Inc. in 1964. Sold to Yukon Fishing & Transportation Co. between 1965 & 1967. Registry closed between 1981 & 1988.

- Danaco is an acronym for Day Navigation Co.

Democrat U.S.A. #215922 1918 Seattle, Washington 34 56 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Hans Hamm by 1925. Sold to Nordby Supply Co. in 1927 or 1928. Wrecked in the Yukon River in 1931.
Discovery II ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Yutana.
Dispatch None 1903 St. Michael, Alaska Northern Commercial Co. 35 feet Originally owned by the NC Co.
Dr. Martin U.S.A. #215793 1917 Seattle, Washington Capt. Anderson 28 61 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Originally owned by King County, Washington. Sold to Northern Commercial Co. in 1924. Destroyed by fire in 1926.
Dorothy U.S.A. #157505 1898 Seattle, Washington 126 75 feet Originally steam power-stern wheel and owned by Koyukuk Mining & Exploration Co. At Bergman, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] KM&E Co. dissolved in 1904. Boat converted to gasoline power in 1911. Registry closed in 1916 or 1917.

- Named for Dorothy W. Lund (1897-1972), daughter of Capt. George H. Wonson of the KM&E Co.

Elaine G U.S.A. #258597 1945 Fairbanks, Alaska 84 64 feet Diesel power-stern wheel. Originally owned by Donald A. Peterson. Peterson died in 1967. Registry closed in 1970.
Emily U.S.A. #204379 1907 St. Michael, Alaska 11 47 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Albert E. Edwards. Owned by John B. Sifton by 1925. Sold to Fred B. Jorgensen in 1931 or 1932. Stranded at Juneau, Alaska in 1943.

- Named for Emily Edwards (1901 or 1902-fl. 1920), daughter of Albert E.

Emma R None by 1946 Diesel power-stern wheel. Owned by Donald A. Peterson. Reported to exist in 1955.
Emma R No. 2 None by 1946 Diesel power-stern wheel. Owned by Donald A. Peterson. Reported to exist in 1946.
Emmonak

(Kantishna, 1968- 2005; Grayling, after 2005–present)

U.S.A. #532268 1945 Jersey City, New Jersey Walsh Construction Co. 80 44 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Weaver Bros. prior to 1968. Sold to Black Navigation Co. in 1968. Enlarged to 54' × 22' in 1980. Transferred to Crowley Marine Services, Inc. in 2005. Sold to Cruz Marine, LLC and converted to a barge in 2013.

- Emmonak is derived from a Yup’ik phrase which means blackfish.[4] Kanitshna is derived from a Koyukon phrase which means uncertain river.[4]

Ensee U.S.A. #227463 1923 Seattle, Washington 86 67 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Northern Commercial Co. Broken up at St. Michael, Alaska in 1967.

- Ensee is the vocalization of the initials of the NC Co.

Frontiersman Canada #116614 1908 Whitehorse, Yukon 4 45 feet Gasoline power-stern wheel. Owned by Clair Marcil and Thomas Smith. Gone in 1920.
Grayling ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Emmonak.
Hazel B No. 1 U.S.A. #243456 1941 Wrangell, Alaska 102 65 feet Diesel power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Capt. Sydney C. Barrington. Sold to Harry Donnelley in 1945. Sold to Kuskokwim Transportation Co. in 1949. Sold to Alaska Towing & Salvage Co. in 1952 or 1953. Abandoned between 1965 & 1967.

- Named for Hazel Barrington (1877-1954), wife of Capt. Sydney C.[37]

Hazel B No. 2

(“ST 467” during World War II)

U.S.A. #231646 1932 Seattle, Washington Marine Construction Co. 143 93 feet Diesel power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Capt. Sydney C. Barrington. Operated for U.S. Army during World War II as “ST 467.” Sold to Alaska Dept. of Health in 1952 or 1953. Sold to Donald A. Peterson in 1955. Peterson died in 1967. Registry closed between 1981 & 1988.

- Named for Hazel Barrington (1877-1954), wife of Capt. Sydney C.[37]

Hettie B U.S.A. #96278 1894 San Francisco, California 27 43 feet Originally a sloop with an auxiliary gasoline engine and screw propeller and owned by John A. McNear. Sold to Alaska-Yukon Transportation Co. in 1897. Converted to steam power-screw propeller in 1898. May have been at Koyukuk River, Alaska during winter of 1898-1899. Converted back to gasoline power in 1902. Eventually owned by George D. Schofield. Stranded at Safety Lagoon, Alaska in 1919.
Idler U.S.A. #209222 1911 Fairbanks, Alaska Fred G. Noyes 71 64 feet Originally, steam power-stern wheel (chain drive). Originally owned by Fred G. Noyes. Sold to George S. Black, converted to Diesel power, and reduced from 98 to 71 gross tons in 1935. Transferred to George S. Black Estate in 1953. Abandoned in 1956.
Joe Mathews U.S.A. #77286 1898 St. Michael, Alaska 19 46 feet Originally, steam power-screw propeller and owned by Cascade Development Co. At Arctic City, Alaska on the Koyukuk River during the winter of 1898-1899.[26] Stranded at Cape Nome, Alaska in 1899. In 1906, hull rebuilt, reduced from 46 to 19 gross tons, and converted to Gasoline power. Eventually owned by J. Myron Haley. Stranded at Cape Darby, Alaska in 1910.

- Named for Joseph R. “Joe” Mathews (1865–1935), Alaska steamboat pilot.[72]

Kantishna ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Emmonak.
Keystone U.S.A. #208580 1911 Seattle, Washington 14 55 feet Gasoline power-stern wheel. Owned by Keystone Transportation Co. Abandoned in 1923 or 1924.
Kusko U.S.A. #237519 1938 Fairbanks, Alaska George S. Black 17 50 feet Diesel power-screw propeller. Originally owned by George S. Black. Transferred to George S. Black Estate in 1953. Sold to Yutana Barge Lines, Inc. in 1964. Registry closed between 1981 & 1988.
Marie Balmer U.S.A. #208035 1910 St. Michael, Alaska 9 54 feet Originally gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Edwin H. Flynn. Converted to steam power in 1913 or 1914. Abandoned in 1922 or 1923.
Martha Angeline None about 1916 Gasoline power-screw propeller. Acquired by Alaska Dept. of Education and became a hospital boat in 1926. Retired in 1935.
Mary U.S.A. #223314 1922 Fairbanks, Alaska 11 43 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Waechter Bros. in 1926. Sold to Northern Commercial Co. in 1929 or 1930. Sold to John Monohan in 1930 or 1931. Abandoned in 1943.
2nd Messenger U.S.A. #208034 1908 San Francisco, California 10 44 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Northern Commercial Co. Abandoned in 1922 or 1923.
Mildred U.S.A. #241824 1928 Nenana, Alaska 40 61 feet Diesel power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Northern Commercial Co. Sold to Evans Hawk in 1971. Sold to Hakala Navigation Co. in 1972. Registry closed between 1981 & 1988.
Misabe No. 1 U.S.A. #230855 1931 Belmar, New Jersey 14 37 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Northern Commercial Co. Broken up at St. Michael, Alaska in 1969.

- Misabe is derived from an Ojibwe word which means giant.[4]

Mud Hen U.S.A. #237901 1928 Fairbanks, Alaska 14 40 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by George S. Black. Abandoned in 1949.
3rd Northern Light U.S.A. #223316 1922 Nenana, Alaska 18 38 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Samuel Clow. Abandoned in 1932 or 1933.
No. 1 U.S.A. #249012 1945 Fairbanks, Alaska 113 111 feet Diesel power-screw propeller. Originally owned by Donald A. Peterson. Peterson died in 1967. Registry closed between 1981 & 1988.
No. 2 U.S.A. #249013 1945 Fairbanks, Alaska 113 111 feet Originally, Diesel power-screw propeller and owned by Donald A. Peterson. Converted to a barge in 1956. Peterson died in 1967. Registry closed between 1981 & 1988.
Ohio None Gasoline power-screw propeller. Eventually owned by Empire Transportation Co.
Pelican No. 4 U.S.A. #230869 1931 Seattle, Washington Norman Blanchard 19 51 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Originally owned by George S. Black. Transferred to George S. Black Estate in 1953. Sold to Charles M. Binkley, Jr. and William English in 1956. Sold to Inland Riverways, Inc. in 1958. Broken up in 1968.
Play Fair U.S.A. #246020 1928 Seattle, Washington 14 31 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Clarence Dull by 1944. Sold to Northern Commercial Co. in 1947. Abandoned in 1954.
Roosevelt None Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Northern Commercial Co.
Rough Rider U.S.A. #111410 1902 Ballard, Washington 11 60 feet Gasoline power-stern wheel. Originally owned by Hoey V. V. Bean and Capt. Ernest C. Miller. Sold to Keystone Transportation Co. between 1905 & 1907. Abandoned in 1924 or 1925.
Sadie U.S.A. #202452 1905 St. Michael, Alaska 8 34 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Registry closed in 1912 or 1913.
Sea Wolf U.S.A. #245555 1939 Holikachuk, Alaska 38 54 feet Gasoline power-stern wheel. Owned by Harry Donnelley by 1944. Sold to Nick Demientieff in 1958. Registry closed in 1970.
Shamrock None by 1929 Originally, steam power-stern wheel. Obtained by Klondike Airways about 1929. Subsequently, converted to Gasoline power. Retired in 1938.
ST 467 ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... ...... See, Hazel B No. 2.
Taku Chief U.S.A. #237245 1938 Seattle, Washington Olson & Sunde Marine Works 42 59 feet Diesel power-screw propeller. Originally owned by the Taku Vessel Co. Sold to U.S. Civil Aeronautics Board in 1945. Sold to Yutana Barge Lines, Inc. in 1956. Condemned in 1978. On display at Nenana, Alaska.

- Taku is a contraction of a longer Tlingit phrase, which means a flooding of Canada geese.[15][36]

Tana U.S.A. #201820 1905 Seattle, Washington 234 106 feet Originally, gasoline power-stern wheel and owned by Capt. Wallace Langley. Converted to steam power in 1906. Sold to Alaska Rivers Navigation Co. in 1933. Abandoned in 1940.

- Tana was derived from an Ahtna phrase, which means “bagged-object-is-in-position” river.[4][51] Most likely, a contraction or an idiom.[60]

Tanana U.S.A. #222526 1922 Tanana, Alaska 10 52 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by H. F. Bryam. Abandoned in 1930 or 1931.

- Tanana derived from a Lower Tanana phrase, which is not the name of the Tanana River, but is the name of the village. Means river trail.[4][15][33]

The Marion None 1945 Old Crow, Yukon 30 Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Northern Commercial Co.
Tolovana U.S.A. #233318 1923 Nenana, Alaska 16 40 feet Gasoline power-stern wheel. Owned by John Barrack. Abandoned in 1929 or 1930.

- Tolovana was derived from a Lower Tanana phrase which means grey water river.[4]

Visitor U.S.A. #228079 1928 St. Michael, Alaska 13 39 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by George T. Butler. Destroyed by fire at Hamilton, Alaska in 1933.
Vixen Canada #116612 1907 Whitehorse, Yukon Eli Verreau 5 40 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by Eli Verreau. Broken up in 1918.
Wave U.S.A. #204697 1907 Decatur, Washington 11 42 feet Gasoline power-screw propeller. Owned by E. H. Pfaffle by 1925. Sold to Lomen Reindeer Corp. in 1927 or 1928. Abandoned in 1948.
Yutana

(Discovery II, 1970–present)

U.S.A. #271285 1953 Fairbanks, Alaska Arthur L. Peterson 122 81 feet Diesel power-stern wheel. Originally owned by George S. Black. Transferred to George S. Black estate in 1953. Sold to Alaska Riverways, Inc. in 1967. Rebuilt in 1970. Now 180 gross tons and 116 feet long.

- Yutana is a blend of Yukon and Tanana.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m Many listed vessel names were derived from aboriginal words and phrases, as stated under “Remarks.” In order to represent aboriginal place names in writing, the pronunciations of these names had to be conformed to English phonology. The aboriginal languages had no written alphabet. Glave, Edward J. (1892). “Pioneer Packhorses in Alaska – 1.” 44 Century Magazine 673 (September 1892). Furthermore, they had about 12 sounds that do not occur in English. Therefore, there were no symbols which corresponded to these non-English sounds. If the aboriginal place names were to be preserved in writing, the pronunciations had to be conformed to English sounds. An example of a sound which does not occur in English is the initial consonant in the word Tlingit. It is a lateral sound, which means that it is made to the side of the tongue. Begin by holding the tip of the tongue against the roof of the mouth, as you would when you begin to pronounce a “d” or “t” sound. Then drop a side of the tongue and make a “thl” sound on that side. In addition, aboriginal place names usually describe some prominent characteristic of the place. Descriptive place names were needed as a tool to guide the traveler. See, Davidson, George (1883). The Kohklux Map. Yukon Historical & Museums Assn. , at page 25. The aboriginal traveler had to commit to memory only the description of a place, and no additional arbitrary name. This was of assistance, because the aboriginal languages had not been reduced to writing prior to the arrival of the English or Russian language. As a consequence of having access only to information that could be remembered, people in the pre-1900 aboriginal societies had to deal with the world quite differently from people today.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Gross Tons represents the sum of the number of cubic feet in the hull plus the number of cubic feet in enclosed spaces above the hull, divided by 100. It is not the actual weight of the boat. See, Tonnage.
  3. ^ a b c Bergsland, Knut (ed.) (1994). Aleut Dictionary: Unangam Tunudgusii. Alaska Native Language Center. ISBN 1-55500-047-9. , at pp. 49 (Alaxsxi-x [mainland Alaska]), 50 (alagu-x [sea]), 508 (suffix -gi [object of its action]).
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad Bright, William (2007). Native American Placenames in the United States. University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0806135984. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q Curtin, Walter R. (1938). Yukon Voyage: Unofficial Log of the Steamer Yukoner. Caxton Printers. , at pp. 278-81, 284, 287.
  6. ^ a b Alaska Commercial Co. Account #278 (1911 Alice & Susitna sale), Box 8, Folder 2; AC Co. Ledger, 1908-1911, Box 28, Alaska Commercial Co. Records, Accession No. JL006, Dept. of Special Collections, Leland Stanford, Jr. University, Stanford, California. The AC Co. still operated coastwise steamers as of 1909. The Northern Navigation Co. never operated on the Susitna River, where this boat operated from 1909 to 1911.
  7. ^ Certificate of Incorporation of the Canadian Development Co., 38 British Columbia Gazette 561-62 (No. 65, Feb. 10, 1898), ¶ (a) (1) (purchase of Teslin & Yukon Transportation Co.).
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Except for the Anglian, the remaining seven boats that the Canadian Development Co. built itself, purchased new, or renamed, were named for the stampeders of prior gold rushes: AustraliainVictoria in 1851; CanadianBritish Columbia in 1850 and 1861; [British] ColumbianCanada in 1850 and 1861; Tasmanian (2 boats) – Beaconsfield in 1877; VictorianAustralia in 1851; [New] ZealandianOtago in 1864. The company built the Australian itself, purchased new the Canadian, Columbian, Victorian, and Steamer Tasmanian; and renamed one of its pre-owned boats, the Zealandian. Either purchased new or renamed was the Gas Launch Tasmanian.
  9. ^ a b c d e f Kitchener, Lois D. (1954). Flag Over the North: The Story of the Northern Commercial Company. Superior Publishing Co. , at pp. 102-04, 107, 111, 114.
  10. ^ Berton, Pierre (1958). The Klondike Fever: The Life and Death of the Last Great Gold Rush. Alfred A. Knopf. , at pp. 192, 310-11.
  11. ^ a b c Akrigg, G. Philip, and Helen B. Akrigg (1997). British Columbia Place Names, 3rd ed. UBC Press. p. 132. ISBN 0-7748-0636-2. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  12. ^ a b c d e f g Turner, Robert D. (2015). The Klondike Gold Rush Steamers: A History of Yukon River Steam Navigation. Sono Nis Press. , at pp. 38 (Chas. H. Hamilton, John J. Healy), 49 (John C. Barr), 91-92 (Burleigh-Moran contract), 188 (John Cudahy, Will H. Isom, Portus B. Weare), 210 (Isabelle).
  13. ^ Campbell v. Moran Bros., 97 Fed. 477, 478 (9th Cir. 1899).
  14. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Coutts, Robert C. (2003). Yukon Places and Names. Moose Creek Publishing. 
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z Phillips, James W. (1973). Alaska-Yukon Place Names. University of Washington Press. ISBN 0-295-95259-8. 
  16. ^ Campbell v. Moran Bros., No. 533, Complaint ¶4, testimony of F. K. Gustin, transcript of record at pp. 2, 9, 67 (9th Cir., Apr. 8, 1899).
  17. ^ a b c The Reaper and the Gleaner (one who gathers a crop after it is reaped) were intended to be sister ships built by or for the John Irving Navigation Co. However, soon thereafter, the Reaper was sold and renamed Zealandian.
  18. ^ a b c d e f Newell (1966). H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. , at pp. 12 (Note 1: Capt. J. C. Barr, Capt. J. J. Healy, Portus B. Weare), 29 (Hannah, Sarah, Susie), 508 (Note 2: C. J. Rogers).
  19. ^ a b c d e f g Coffee, Phillip M. (2005). El Sueño de Oro: The Dream of Gold. Trafford Publishing. ISBN 1-4120-4705-6. , at pp. 14, 278-81, 284, 287. Note the upper case “T”s in the 1897 manuscript page reproduced at page 14: the upper case “T” in “Total” looks like a “Y.” In addition, “El Sueño de Oro M.&T. Co” looks like “El Sueño de Oro M.&Y. Co.” The 2005 reprint erroneously reproduces the upper case “T”s as “Y.”
  20. ^ Campbell, No. 533, Complaint ¶4, transcript of record at pp. 2, 7.
  21. ^ Adams, Charles W. (2002). A Cheechako Goes to the Klondike. Alaska Heritage Library. ISBN 0-9708493-9-7. , at page 130 (“Burrington” should be “Burrichter”).
  22. ^ a b c d e f g h Ogilvie, William. “Geography and Resources of the Yukon River.” 12 The Geographical Journal, No. 1 (July 1898), at pp. 21, 30 (“means Hammer creek … they used to erect barriers across the mouth to catch salmon by hammering sticks …”).
  23. ^ a b c d See, 14 Dawson Daily News, No. 59 (Oct. 7, 1912), “Remarkable Work of Archbishop McDonald in Yukon” (“Some of the Indians seem to think that the origin of the name is Ttrhondik or Large Salmon river. The stone hammer used in driving the stakes which formed the sides of the salmon fish traps was called trurh, and this seems to me to be the primary origin of the name of the famous river.”); Wright, Allen A. (1976). Prelude to Bonanza: The Discovery and Exploration of the Yukon. Gray’s Publishing. , at page 286, note 70 (Ogilvie translated Trondiuck as hammer-water … This is only one of several versions of the origin of the name …”); Klondike: The Chicago Record’s Book for Gold Seekers. Monroe Book Co. 1897. p. 437 (“Klondike, we are told, means salmon river.”. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  24. ^ a b c d See, Ritter, John T. (1978). Han Gwich’in Athapascan Noun Dictionary (PDF). University of Alaska. pp. 22 (tr'ojà' [king salmon]), 66 (wèe trät tr'ödoht'orr [hammer]), 80 (-ndek [most common ending in the Dawson region meaning river]). Retrieved 2017-10-16.  But, see, Bright (2007). Native American Placenames in the United States. , at page 229, which reports that Mr. Ritter later opined that t’ro is a Hän form of hammer which “no longer occurs in isolation.” This is certainly possible; however, idioms occur frequently in all languages. In addition, the conflicting translations of Klondike are explained by differing attempts to abbreviate the meaning of an idiom. See, 14 Dawson Daily News, No. 59 (Oct. 7, 1912), and Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , both cited above. Therefore, tr'o•ndek appears more likely to be an idiom in which t’ro is a shortened form of the Hän word tr'ojà' (Chinook salmon).
  25. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Motherwell, John L. (2012). Gold Rush Steamboats: Francis Rattenbury’s Yukon Venture. John L. Motherwell. ISBN 978-0-9868982-0-4. , at pp. 56-57 (Flora, Nora, Ora), 71 (A. J. Goddard), 77 (Flora), 83 (Flora, Nora, Ora), 160-61 (S. S. Bailey), 169 (James Domville), 172 (Olive May), 259 (LaFrance, Thistle), 270 (Emma Nott), 272 (James Domville).
  26. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Wonson, George H. (1899). Map of Koyukuk River Alaska. O. P. Anderson Map & Blue Print Co. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  27. ^ New York Times, November 9, 1897.
  28. ^ Dawson, George M. (1888). Report on an Exploration in the Yukon District, N.W.T., and Adjacent Northern Portion of British Columbia 1887 (PDF). Geological and Natural History Survey of Canada. p. 155 (“river, known to the Tagish Indians as Ni-Sutlin-Hi-Ni”). Retrieved 2017-10-22.  Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , at page 183.
  29. ^ Sidney, Angela (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. Council for Yukon Indians. , at #33 (Nisaleen probably from Athapaskan). Mrs. Sidney knew both Tagish and Tlingit, but did not know the origin of the word, suggesting that it was from an Athabascan language other than Tagish. (Tlingit is not an Athabascan language.) The original Tlingit name for the Nisutlin River was Héen Tlein [Big River]. Schwatka, Frederick (1996). Schwatka’s Last Search: The New York Ledger Expedition Through Unknown Alaska and British America. Univ. of Alaska Press. ISBN 0-912006-87-0. , at page 96.
  30. ^ The Southern Tutchone phrase is nàsät-lį (nàsät [strong] + [flow], "į" is nasalized). See, Tlen, Daniel (1993). Kluane Southern Tutchone Glossary. Yukon College. , at pp. 72 (nàsät [strong]), 74 (nasal vowels); Davidson (1883). The Kohklux Map. , at page 26 (the Athabascan suffix -lin means flowing); Tom, Gertie (1987). Èkeyi: Gyò Cho Chú (My Country: Big Salmon River). Yukon Native Language Centre. , at page 16 (#32: délin [running out]).
  31. ^ a b c d e f g h i Orth, Donald J. (1967). Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. U.S. Government Printing Office. 
  32. ^ a b Zagoskin, Lavrenty A., and Henry N. Michael (ed.) (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels in Russian America, 1842-1844: The First Ethnographic and Geographic Investigations in the Yukon and Kuskokwim Valleys of Alaska. Univ. of Toronto Press. , at page 96.
  33. ^ a b c d e f Kari, James (2012). Lower Tanana Athabascan Place Names. Alaska Native Language Center. , at pp. 12 (B.1.a: nen’ [land], B.2.c: no’ [stream]), 21 (#6 [Tanana]), 76 (#901 [Nenana]).
  34. ^ a b c Metaphors are often used as place names. Thornton, Thomas F. (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú: Our Grandparents’ Names on the Land (PDF). Sealaska Heritage Institute. p. xvi (“Another type of semantic association is metaphor.”). ISBN 978-0-295-98858-0. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  35. ^ Edwards, Keri (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). Sealaska Heritage Institute. pp. 16 (When possessed, alienable nouns require the possession suffix -[y]i), 47 (áa [lake]), 255 (t’ooch’ [charcoal]). ISBN 978-0-9825786-6-7. Retrieved 2015-09-14. . Tlingit had fewer adjectives than other languages. Id. at page 14 (a very small category in Tlingit). This shortage of adjectives occasionally necessitated the use of substitute lexical items, such as metaphors. Sometime after Tutshi Lake had acquired its name, the word t’ooch’ did evolve also to be a standard adjective meaning black. If t’ooch’ had been an adjective meaning black at the time that the lake acquired its name, then the name would not have needed the possession suffix (-i). The name would have been Áa t’ooch’.
  36. ^ a b c d e Thornton (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú (PDF). pp. 57 (#22: Áa Tlein [big lake]), 57 (#2: T’ooch’ Áayi [black lake]), 68 (T'aakú … is likely a contraction of the longer phrase, T’aawák Galakú …), 76 (#121: T'aakú [flood of geese]). Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  37. ^ a b c d e Ferrell, Nancy W. (2008). White Water Skippers of the North: The Barringtons. Hancock House Publishers. ISBN 978-0-88839-616-7. , at pp. 81, 99, 102, 107, 180, 183-85.
  38. ^ a b “Dear Sir, I have great pleasure in informing you that I have at length after much trouble and difficulties, succeed[ed] in reaching the ‘Youcon’, or white water River, so named by the (Gwich’in) natives from the pale colour of its water. …, I have the honour to Remain Your obᵗ Servᵗ, John BellHudson’s Bay Company Correspondence to George Simpson from John Bell (August 1, 1845), HBC Archives, D.5/14, fos. 212-215d, also quoted in, Coates, Kenneth S. & William R. Morrison (1988). Land of the Midnight Sun: A History of the Yukon. Hurtig Publishers. p. 21. ISBN 0-88830-331-9. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  39. ^ a b In Gwich’in, adjectives, such as choo [big] and gąįį [white], follow the nouns that they modify. Thus, white water is chųų gąįį [water white]. White water river is chųų gąįį han [water white river]. Peter, Katherine (1979). Dinjii Zhuh Ginjik Nagwan Tr’iłtsąįį: Gwich’in Junior Dictionary (PDF). Univ. of Alaska. pp. ii (ą, į, ų are nasalized a, i, u), xii (adjectives follow nouns), 19 (nitsii or choo [big]), 88 (ocean = chųų choo [water big]), 105 (han [river]), 142 (chųų [water]), 144 (gąįį [white]). Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  40. ^ Gwich’in vowels may or may not be nasalized. A hook under a vowel, as in “ų,” indicates that the vowel is nasalized. Peter (1979). Dinjii Zhuh Ginjik Nagwan Tr’iłtsąįį. , at page ii (footnote). English, of course, has no nasalized vowels.
  41. ^ “[The Yukon] in the language of the Kang-ulit (Yup’ik) people is Kvikhpak; in the dialect of the downriver Inkilik (Holikachuk), Yukkhana; of those upriver (Koyukon), Yuna. All these terms mean the same thing in translation–‘Big River.’ I have kept the local names as a clearer indication of the different tribes along the river.” Lt. Zagoskin’s Note 63 (1848), translated in, Zagoskin and Michael (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels. , at page 295. Zagoskin did not come into contact with the Gwich’in Indians and had no access to the information that Yukon means white water river in Gwich’in – the language from which the word came.
  42. ^ In Holikachuk, big river or big water would be xinmiksekh, xinchux, toomiksekh, or toochux. Kari, James, et. al. (1978). Holikachuk Noun Dictionary (PDF). Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks. p. 19 (xin [river], too [water]). Retrieved 2017-10-16. ; Zagoskin and Michael (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels. , at page 309 (Inkilik proper [Holikachuk] tu [water], miksekh [large]); Hargus, Sharon (2008). Vowel quality and duration in Deg Xinag (PDF). Univ. of Washington. p. 29 (note 33: Holikachuk chux [big]). Retrieved 2017-10-16.  Adjectives followed the nouns that they modified in Holikachuk.
  43. ^ Thirty-nine pages of cited “Sources,” representing over a century of research, did not verify Zagoskin’s report that Yukon means big river. Orth (1967). Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. , at pp. 6-44 (“Sources of Names”), 1069 (“The Eskimo … descriptively called it ‘Kuikpak’ meaning ‘big river.’ The Indian name ‘Yukon’ probably means the same thing.”). Orth does not say “probably” when discussing Kuikpak’s meaning. Orth’s use of “probably” is limited to the discussion of Yukon’s meaning, which indicates that Zagoskin’s report that Yukon means big river was never verified. In addition, Orth’s “Sources” do not even include the Hudson’s Bay Company correspondence, which states that Yukon means white water river in Gwich’in. Nor do Orth’s “Sources” include aboriginal dictionaries.
  44. ^ Lt. Zagoskin reported that: “The … Inkilit [Holikachuk] … live along the routes of communication between the Yukon and the coast and are occupied almost exclusively with buying up furs from the natives living along the Yunnaka (Koyukuk River, a Yukon tributary).” Zagoskin also reported that: “The Inkalik [Holikachuk] …, who are chiefly occupied in trading both with their fellow tribesmen and with the neighboring tribes of Kang-ulit (Yup’ik Eskimo), have adopted the way of life of the latter …” Zagoskin and Michael (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels. , at pp. 196-97, 244. Because they had adopted the Eskimo way of life, and because they were the ones trading upriver, the Holikachuk would have been "the Esquimaux" referred to in John Bell’s 1845 report: "The Esquimaux to the westwards likewise ascends the ‘Youcon’ and carry on a trade with the natives, as well as with the Musquash [Gwich’in] Indians … I have seen a large camp of the latter tribe on the Rat River on my return, who, had about a doz: of beat [hammered] Iron Kettles of Russian Manufacture which they bartered from the Esquimaux." See, Hudson’s Bay Company Correspondence to Simpson from Bell (1845), HBC Archives, D.5/14, fos. 212, 213. For these reasons, the Holikachuk were in a position to conflate the meanings of the Gwich’in and Yup’ik names, and to furnish this conflated information to the Russian-American Company.
  45. ^ Taylor, William L. (editor) (1963). Fragmentary Records of the Custom House, St. Michael, Alaska 1894-1917. Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society. , at pp. 75, 275.
  46. ^ Republicans of Illinois: A Portrait and Chronological Record of Members of the Republican Party. Lewis Publishing Co. 1905. p. 134. Retrieved 2017-10-16.  Like many prominent Chicago politicians, Mr. Bradley was more infamous than famous. For seven years (1897-1904), he conspired with his superior, the Clerk of Court, to pad the office payroll with fictitious names in order to collect the corresponding salaries. Mr. Bradley left office in 1904, waited out the 18-month statute of limitations which applied to his own activities, and then turned state’s evidence against his former superior. Cooke v. The People, 231 Ill. 9, 11-14, 82 N.E. 863, 864-65 (1907). During the trial, one of the jurors was offered a substantial sum of money if he would prevent a conviction. Thereafter, the judges of the court refused to investigate any irregularities in their clerk’s office. Mr. Bradley passed away in San Mateo County, California. San Mateo County Coroner’s Records 1865-1967, at, http://www.sfgenealogy.com/sanmateo/smcgs/coroner/coroner-9-12.htm (Jan. 18, 2014).
  47. ^ a b c d e f In addition to the Torpedo Catcher (1899), the Pacific Contract Co. ordered two more steam scows to be built in 1900. Minter (1987). The White Pass. , at page 335. The Omega was one of the 1900 steam scows. There is no further record relating to the existence of a second 1900 steam scow.
  48. ^ Minter, Roy (1987). The White Pass: Gateway to the Klondike. University of Alaska Press. ISBN 0-912006-26-9. , at page 322.
  49. ^ Ritter, John T. (n.d.). Mayo Indian Language Noun Dictionary. Yukon Department of Education. , at pp. 13, 31 (berry), 17, 40 (man).
  50. ^ a b Jacobson (1984). Yup’ik Eskimo Dictionary. , at pp. 269 (nuna [land]), 327 (Qerrullik [Kotlik]), 584 (-vak [big]).
  51. ^ a b c d e Kari, James (2008). Ahtna Place Names Lists, 2nd ed. Alaska Native Language Center. , at pp. 48 (#136: Tana River), 133 (#1243: Nabesna River), 134 (#1259: Chisana River).
  52. ^ a b Vaizey, Wendy (1995). A Brief History of Close Brothers. Close Bros. Group. , at page 2.
  53. ^ Jack, Johnny Taku (Nov. 3, 1978 interview). Robert G. McCandless Fonds, Sound Recording 103(3), Accession No. 88/109R, Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon, at 1 minute, 18 seconds (Johnny was one of Chief Taku Jack’s sons); Steele, Peter (1995). Atlin’s Gold. Caitlin Press. ISBN 0-920576-47-8. , at page 153 (abbreviated explanation). Téya.aahéeni = [rock] + ya [intransitive verb classifier] + .aa [to be situated] + héen [stream water] + i [possession suffix].
  54. ^ MacBride, William D. (1991). All My Rivers Flowed West. Beringan Books. ISBN 0-9692-744-4-0. , at page 58. Possibly, from aarpag. See, Jacobson (1984). Yup’ik Eskimo Dictionary. , at page 42.
  55. ^ WP&YR freight between Vancouver and Skagway had been handled by Canadian Pacific Ry’s. Yukon Princess from 1951 to 1955. Yukon Princess steam powered-screw propeller, British Type B standard vessel, 214 feet hull length, 1334 gross tons. Built in 1946 at North Vancouver, British Columbia by Pacific Dry Dock Co. (hull #159) for the Canadian government. Originally named Ottawa Parapet, registered in Canada (#176046), and intended for wartime use along the coast of China. Sold to Clarke S.S. Co. and renamed Island Connector in 1946. Purchased by C.P.R. and renamed Yukon Princess in 1951. Laid up in 1956. Sold to Cia. Vapores David, renamed West Princess, and registered in Liberia (#1250) in 1958. Resold to La Luz Mines Ltd. and renamed Rosita in 1959. Grounded at Cape Gracias a Dios, Nicaragua in 1963, a total loss. Sold to Southern Scrap Metals Co. in 1963. Broken up at New Orleans, Louisiana in 1964.
  56. ^ Gray, Carl R., Jr. (1955). Railroading in Eighteen Countries: The Story of American Railroad Men Serving in the Military Railway Service from 1862 to 1953. Charles Scribner’s Sons. , at page 44.
  57. ^ a b Pacific Challenge (IMO5425841), 173 feet hull length, built in 1952 at Arendal, Norway, by Pusnes Mekaniske Verksted A/S (hull #81) for Hvalfanger A/S-Suderøy. Originally, named Suderøy XVI steam powered-screw propeller and registered in Norway. Sold to Anders J. Jahre (d/b/a Kosmos A/S) and renamed KOS-51 in 1959. Resold to Taiyo Gyogyo K.K., renamed 事 二 十 一 利 丸 , Toshi Maru No. 21 (The 21st Commercial Ship), and registered in Japan (#86903) in 1961. Resold to Western Whaling Co., renamed Westwhale 7, and registered in Canada (#320146) in 1963. Resold to Pacific Towing Services, Ltd. and renamed Pacific Challenge in 1970. Purchased by Knight Towing, Ltd. and reduced from 590 to 547 gross tons in 1971. Converted to Diesel power in 1973. Towed Frank H. Brown and 3rd Klondike, under contract from 1979 to 1981. Sold to Pacific Bunkering, Inc. and renamed Jacqueline W in 1986. Resold to Hi-Seas Marine (Belize), Ltd. and renamed back to Pacific Challenge in 1996. Retired and registry closed in 2008. Derelict at Whiskey Slough, British Columbia, as of 2013.
  58. ^ Bennett, Gordon (1978). Yukon Transportation: A History. Parks Canada. pp. 145–46. ISBN 0-660-01671-0. Retrieved 2017-11-14. 
  59. ^ Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 192 (neech [shoreline]), 324 (yeil’ [calm]). Retrieved 2015-09-14. ; Ellis, Patricia (2011). The Survivors: The True Stories of Four B.Y.N. Ships that Survived Fire, Flood and Decades of Gruelling Travel on Yukon’s Lakes and Rivers. MacBride Museum of Yukon History. ISBN 978-0-9867649-2-9. , at page 42 (“calm water”).
  60. ^ a b c d The figurative translations of idioms are sometimes longer than the literal translation.
  61. ^ Kari, James (2013). Dena’ina Topical Dictionary. Alaska Native Language Center. , at pp. 104 (idlu [objects]), 123 (#11.2.1: suffix -tnu [stream]).
  62. ^ a b c Midnight Sun (gas-stern wheel), Sunbeam (gas-screw), Sundog (scow), Sundog No. 2 (scow), Sunflower (gas-screw), Sunstroke (pile driver barge).
  63. ^ a b Crittenden, Katharine Carson (2002). Get Mears! Frederick Mears: Builder of The Alaska Railroad. Binford & Mort. ISBN 0-8323-0550-2. , at pp. 42, 84, 244-45.
  64. ^ a b Year 1954 closely corresponds to the end of four significant operating eras on the Yukon River: the end of steam operation, the end of White Pass river operation, the end of Alaska Railroad river operation, and the death of the next biggest river operator, George S. Black.
  65. ^ a b c d e f g “Vessels for Sale,” 97 Sacramento Record-Union, No. 153 (July 24, 1899), at page 1, Col. 4.
  66. ^ a b Sidney (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. , Entry No. 54.
  67. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Wyman, Jasper N. (1988). Journey to the Koyukuk: The Photos of J. N. Wyman, 1898-1899. Pictorial Histories Publishing Co. ISBN 0-933126-99-9. , at pp. 28, 40, 79, 99, 100.
  68. ^ a b c d “The Koyukuk Gold Fields,” 16 Sausalito News, No. 4 (May 6, 1899), at page 1, Col. 3.
  69. ^ a b c Francis Rattenbury and British Columbia]author=Barrett, Francis A., and Rhodri Windsor Liscombe. University of British Columbia Press. 1983. ISBN 0-7748-0178-6. , at page 64.
  70. ^ a b The Seattle-Yukon Transportation Co. purchased a sternwheeler named Starkey (Moran Bros. hull #7, 93 gross tons). Colton, Tim (2012). Vigor Industrial, Seattle WA. However, the Starkey sank when it was launched. “Suicide in a Clubhouse.” 51 New York Times, No. 16,330 (May 9, 1902).
  71. ^ a b c Wyman, Jasper N. (1988). Journey to the Koyukuk: The Photos of J. N. Wyman, 1898-1899. Pictorial Histories Publishing Co. ISBN 0-933126-99-9. , at pp. 8, 14.
  72. ^ a b c d Whalley, William G. (2009). Yukon River Trader Gregory Kokrine and His Family, at pp. 8-9, 20.
  73. ^ a b Zagoskin, Lavrenty A., and Henry N. Michael (ed.) (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels in Russian America, 1842-1844: The First Ethnographic and Geographic Investigations in the Yukon and Kuskokwim Valleys of Alaska. University of Toronto Press. , at pp. 145 (local name = Yunnaka), 146 (Malakhov did not know).
  74. ^ a b See, Jacobson (1984). Yup’ik Eskimo Dictionary. , at pp. 210 (kuik [river]), 598 (suffix -yuk [thing like).
  75. ^ Webb, Melody (1993). Yukon: The Last Frontier. Bison Book. ISBN 0-8032-9745-9. , at page 180.
  76. ^ a b “Storm at St. Michael,” 97 Sacramento Record-Union, No. 158 (July 29, 1899), at page 8, Col. 4.
  77. ^ “Articles of Incorporation,” 93 Sacramento Record-Union, No. 176 (August 17, 1897), at page 6, Col. 2; “Alaska Yukon and Klondike Goldfields” (advertisement), 82 San Francisco Call, No. 76 (August 15, 1897), at page 2, Col. 6.
  78. ^ 17 Transactions of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (1909) 96 (“Tunnel Boats”), 103 (“The … Empire, built by Nixon for the Yukon River on this plan”), 105-06 (“This boat was built in 1898 in eight sections and transported to the Yukon.”).
  79. ^ “Schooner No. Three,” 82 San Francisco Call, No. 70 (August 9, 1897), at page 2, Col. 3.
  80. ^ See, Hunt, William R. “I Chopped Wood: George M. Pilcher on the Yukon.” 63 Pacific Northwest Quarterly, No. 2 (1972), at pp. 64 (annual trip to St. Michael, “sometimes” on commercial boats; every fall had to haul his boat ashore), 65 (steam launch in 1908), 66 (“my schooner,” 1903), 67 (kept his boats in repair). In addition, Pilcher owned the 2nd Herbert. Finally, the 1st Herbert appears to have been owned by a merchant and/or miner in Pilcher’s vicinity.
  81. ^ Morrow, Jay J. Report of the Alaska Railroad Commission. H. R. Doc. No. 1346, at 162 (1913), reprinted in, Serial No. 6484; Hunt. “I Chopped Wood:.” 63 Pacific Northwest Quarterly, No. 2, at pp. 64-67.
  82. ^ The reason that the Tagish Indians adopted one of the two versions to identify themselves is that, prior to 1898, they spent their winters along the Tagish River. See, Dawson (1888). Report on an Exploration in the Yukon District, N.W.T., and Adjacent Northern Portion of British Columbia 1887 (PDF). p. 165 (“on the east bank of the river, … the Tagish people … reside during the winter”). Retrieved 2017-10-22. ; Wright, Allen A. (1976). Prelude to Bonanza: The Discovery and Exploration of the Yukon. Gray’s Publishing. , at page 186. In the summers, the tribesmen would fan out in all directions. Id. Their winter home was the one location that they all had in common. It was common for smaller bands of Indians to use a local geographic feature to identify themselves. See, e.g., Thornton (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú. , at page xix (Col. 2).
  83. ^ See, Sidney (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. , Entry No. 54 (Tagish Narrows = Taagish Tóo’e’ [breakup [of ice, e.g.] - water]). The prefix de- or taa- [it]; tu or tóo’ [water]. Figueiredo, Renato B. (ed., 2014). Freelang Tagish Online Dictionary. Gish may have been a loanword from Tlingit. The Tlingit verb root geesh is an idiom, which figuratively means to get wet, and literally means to be like kelp. See, Story, Gillian L. & Constance M. Naish (1973). Tlingit Verb Dictionary (PDF). University of Alaska. pp. 245–46 (geesh [wet]), 314 (geesh [wet]). Retrieved 2017-10-16.  Broken up spring ice does get wet. The suffix -e’ may be the Tagish possession suffix.
  84. ^ So spelled in Alaska Commercial Co. Ledger, 1873-1896, Alaska Commercial Co. Records, Accession No. JL006, Box 24, Dept. of Special Collections, Leland Stanford, Jr. University, Stanford, Californaia.
  85. ^ Bergsland (1994). Aleut Dictionary. , at page 41; Orth (1967). Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. , at page 52 (Aguligik Island, Aguliuk Point); Bright (2004). Native American Placenames in the United States. , at page 24 (Aguligik Island).

General references[edit]

Technical and ownership information of the above boats was derived from the following:

  • Adams, Charles W. (2002). A Cheechako Goes to the Klondike. Alaska Heritage Library. 
  • Affleck, Edward L. (2000). A Century of Paddlewheelers in the Pacific Northwest, the Yukon and Alaska. Alexander Nicolls Press. 
  • Alaska Railroad. S. Doc. No. 68-175 (2nd Sess., 1924), U.S. Gov’t Printing Off. 
  • Alaska Railroad Record, Vols. 1-4 (weekly, 1916-1920).
  • Alig, Joyce L. (2001). Old Gold Rush to Alaska Diaries of 1898-1900. Mercer County Historical Society. 
  • Andrews, Clarence L. (1916). “Marine Disasters in Alaska of the Alaska Route,” 7 The Washington Historical Quarterly, No. 1 (Jan. 1, 1916), at pp. 21–37.
  • Anderson, Barry C. (1983). Lifeline to the Yukon: A History of Yukon River Navigation. Superior Publishing Co. 
  • Annual Report of the Marine Engineers' Beneficial Association. H. Rief. 1903. 
  • Annual Report of the Supervising Inspector-General Steamboat Inspection Service. U.S. Depts. of Treasury & Commerce. 1899–1911. 
  • Bayers, Lloyd H. Capt. Lloyd H. “Kinky” Bayers Collection, General Marine Files, MS 0010, Alaska State Library, Juneau, Alaska.
  • Bennett, Gordon (1978). Yukon Transportation: A History. Parks Canada. ISBN 0-660-01671-0. Retrieved 2017-11-14. 
  • Blue Book of American Shipping: Marine and Naval Directory of the United States. Penton Publishing Co. 1899–1913. 
  • California Digital Newspaper Collection, Center for Bibliographic Studies and Research, University of California, Riverside.
  • Colton, Tim. Shipbuilding History, at, http://www.shipbuildinghistory.com .
  • Downs, Art (1992). British Columbia-Yukon Sternwheel Days. Heritage House Publishing Co. 
  • Ferrell, Nancy Warren (2008). White Water Skippers of the North: The Barringtons. Hancock House. 
  • Gaudin, James R. P. Gaudin Book. COR 753: RG1: II-11, W.P.&Y.R. Company Records, Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon. 
  • Haws, Duncan (1992). Merchant Fleets 23: Canadian Pacific. TCL Publications. 
  • Hedrick, Basil & Susan Savage (1988). Steamboats on the Chena. Epicenter Press. 
  • Jones, E. W (1904). Jones Book. COR 752: RG1, W.P.&Y.R. Company Records, Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon. 
  • Kitchener, Lois D. (1954). Flag Over the North. Superior Publishing Co. 
  • List of Shipping. Canadian Government. , various years.
  • Lloyd’s Register. , various years.
  • Merchant Vessels of the United States. U.S. Depts. of Treasury & Commerce. , various years.
  • Miramar Ship Index, (http://www.miramarshipindex.org.nz/, July 18, 2009).
  • Newell, Gordon (editor) (1966). The H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Superior Publishing Co. 
  • Motherwell, John L. (2012). Gold Rush Steamboats: Francis Rattenbury’s Yukon Venture. John L. Motherwell. 
  • Prince, Bernadine LeMay (1964). The Alaska Railroad In Pictures 1914-1964. Ken Wray’s Print Shop. 
  • Progress Reports of the Alaskan Engineering Commission, 1916-1923. Record Group 126, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland.
  • Report on the Investigation of The Alaska Railroad. S. Rep. No. 71-1230 (3rd Sess., 1931), U.S. Gov’t Printing Off. 
  • Special Report: White Pass & Yukon Route 1901. W.P.&Y.R. Company Records.  Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon.
  • Sundry Civil Appropriations Bill for 1919: Hearings before Subcommittee of House Committee on Appropriations, 65th Cong., 2nd Sess. 1156 (1918) (Alaskan Engineering Commission).
  • Superintendent’s Annual Report of Operation of the River Division. COR 722, W.P.&Y.R. Company Records. 1902–1934.  Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon.
  • Turner, Robert D. (2015). The Klondike Gold Rush Steamers: A History of Yukon River Steam Navigation. Sono Nis Press. 
  • Turner, Robert D. (1984). Sternwheelers and Steam Tugs. Sono Nis Press. 
  • Taylor, William L. (editor) (1963). Fragmentary Records of the Custom House, St. Michael, Alaska 1894-1917. Puget Sound Maritime Historical Society. 
  • White Pass & Yukon Ry. Directors’ Report to the 30th June. 1901–1914.  University of Missouri-St. Louis Mercantile Library, St. Louis, Missouri.
  • White Pass and Yukon Route Comptroller’s Special Report, for years 1902-1949 (privately held)
  • Wright, E. W. (ed.) (1895). Lewis and Dryden’s Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Lewis & Dryden Printing Co.