List of White Pass and Yukon Route locomotives and cars

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The White Pass and Yukon Route railroad has had a large variety of locomotives and railroad cars.

White Pass steam locomotives[edit]

Locomotives with dark grey have been scrapped, while locomotives with light grey have been either put on display, or sold to other railroads.

Number

or Name

Builder Whyte Type

─────── Tractive Effort (1942)[1]

Date

Built

Shop No. Remarks
Duchess Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-4-0T

2,900 lbf (13 kN)

Sep.

1878

4424 No train brake. Originally, Dunsmuir, Diggle & Co. 30-inch gauge 0-6-0T #2, Duchess. (Named for Catherine S. D. Wellesley [1773–1831], wife of the 1st Duke of Wellington.[2]) Dunsmuir, Diggle sold to Wellington Colliery R.R. in 1883. Duchess converted to a 2-4-0T by disconnecting the front drivers, and gauge widened to 3 feet, most likely about 1889. Resold to Albion Iron Works (dealer) thereafter. Resold to John Irving Navigation Co. in April 1900 for use on the Taku Tram. Irving Navigation purchased by the WP&YR in June 1900. Duchess powered the Taku Tram from 1900 to 1920. Used as a trash burner at Carcross, Yukon from 1920 to 1931. In 1931 the locomotive was put on display at the WP&YR depot in Carcros, Yukon, and remains there today.
2nd 4 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-6-2

11,031 lbf (49.07 kN)

Sep.

1912

37564 Originally, Klondike Mines Ry. #4. The KM Ry. was abandoned in 1913. KM Ry. assets sold to the Yukon Consolidated Gold Corp. in 1925. Locomotive purchased by the WP&YR in 1942. Retired in 1952. Sold to the Oak Creek Central Ry. in 1955 (OCC #4). Resold to the Peppermint & North Western R.R. in 1960 (P&NW #4). Resold to the Petticoat Junction R.R. in 1964 (PJ #4). Resold to the Gold Nugget Junction R.R. in 1969 (GNJ #4). Resold to Wild's Game Farm in 1984.[3][4] Resold to Dry Gulch, U.S.A. in 2005. Resold, and moved to Georgetown Loop R.R. in 2015. Resold to South Park Rail Society and restored to service at Como, Colorado in 2017.
8 Climax Locomotive Works 0-4-(4+4-0)

[3-Truck Climax ] 20,000 lbf (89 kN)

Dec.

1897

167 Originally, Colorado & Northwestern Ry. #2. Acquired by the WP&YR in 1899, as #8. In 1900 the locomotive was renumbered 58 on paper, but the locomotive itself was never physically renumbered. Sold to W.D. Hofius & Co. (dealer) in 1902. Resold in 1903 to the White Star Lumber Co., who reduced it to an 0-4-(4-0) [2-truck] type and converted it to standard gauge (WSL #1). Resold to the Maytown Lumber Co. sometime between 1912 and 1916.[5][6] Maytown Lumber discontinued operations in 1929.[7] Locomotive presumed to have been scrapped thereafter.
USA 10 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0

16,010 lbf (71.2 kN)

Jan.

1916

42768 Originally, East Tennessee & Western North Carolina R.R. #10. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942. Bore "W.P.&Y.R." on tender.[8] Severely damaged in the 1943 Whitehorse engine house fire and retired. Scrapped in 1945.[9]
USA 14 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0

16,010 lbf (71.2 kN)

Sep.

1919

52406 Originally, East Tennessee & Western North Carolina R.R. #14. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942. Bore "W.P.&Y.R." on tender.[8] Severely damaged in the 1943 Whitehorse engine house fire and retired. Scrapped in 1945.[9]
USA 20

(ex-USA 3920)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

13,200 lbf (59 kN)

Dec.

1890

11355 Originally, Denver, Leadville & Gunnison Ry. #272. Became Colorado & Southern Ry. #69 in 1899.[10] Purchased by the U.S. Army in April 1943 as #3920 for use on the WP&YR. Renumbered to 20 in June 1943. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[11]
USA 21

(ex-USA 3921)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

13,200 lbf (59 kN)

Dec.

1890

11356 Originally, Denver, Leadville & Gunnison Ry. #273. Became Colorado & Southern Ry. #70 in 1899.[10] Purchased by the U.S. Army in April 1943 as #3921 for use on the WP&YR. Renumbered to 21 in June 1943. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[11]

Exchanged tenders in 1930 with Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R.R. 2-8-0 Loco #537 (Baldwin 1896).[11]

USA 22

(ex-USA 3922)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

12,600 lbf (56 kN)

May

1904

24109 Originally, Silverton Northern R.R. #3. The SN RR was abandoned in 1942. Locomotive sold to Dulien Steel Products Co. (dealer) thereafter. Purchased by the U.S. Army in April 1943 as #3922 for use on the WP&YR. Renumbered to 22 in June 1943. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1945.
USA 23

(ex-USA 3923)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

12,600 lbf (56 kN)

Apr.

1906

27977 Originally, Silverton Northern R.R. #4. The SN RR was abandoned in 1942. Locomotive sold to Dulien Steel Products Co. (dealer) thereafter. Purchased by the U.S. Army in April 1943 as #3923 for use on the WP&YR. Renumbered to 23 in June 1943. Retired in 1944. Shipped out of Skagway, Alaska. Scrapped in 1945.
24

(ex-USA 24, exx-USA 3924)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

15,510 lbf (69.0 kN)

May

1904

24130 Originally, Silverton, Gladstone & Northerly R.R. #34, Gold Prince. Sold to the Silverton Northern R.R. in 1915 (SN #34).[12] The SN RR was abandoned in 1942. Locomotive resold to Dulien Steel Products Co. (dealer) thereafter. Purchased by the U.S. Army in April 1943 as #3924 for use on the WP&YR. Renumbered to 24 in June 1943. Retired in 1945. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947. Scrapped in 1951.

Tender placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1949.[13]

Georgetown Loop RR 40 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

21,437 lbf (95.36 kN)

Sep.

1920

53777 Originally, International Railways of Central America #50. Renumbered to 40 in 1928.[4] The locomotive was sold to Lindsey Ashby (who also had IRCA 44) for use on the Colorado Central Railroad in 1972(CC #40) and was transferd to the Georgetown Loop R.R. in 1977 (GL #40) The locomotive was on loan to the WP&YR in 2000 and 2001, and was returned to the GL RR in 2001. In 2004 the locomotive was transferred to the Colorado Railroad Museum, however in 2017 the Georgetown Loop’s new operator agreed to bring 40 back to the loop to operate alongside IRCA 111, the locomotive 40 originally came to America with when Ashby purchased 40 and Don Drawer #111 (a 1926 Baldwin).
51

(ex-1st 1)

Brooks Locomotive Works 2-6-0

10,380 lbf (46.2 kN)

Jan.

1881

494[14] Originally, Utah & Northern Ry. #23. Renumbered to 80 in 1885 to conform to Union Pacific Ry. system-wide numbering. Sold to the Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1889 (C&PS 2nd 3).[14] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898 as 1st 1. Larger boiler installed and renumbered to 51 in 1900. Powered the Taku Tram from 1920 to 1931. Retired in 1941. In 1958 the locomotive was put on display at The MacBride Museum in Whitehorse, Yukon and it remains there today .
52

(ex-1st 2)

Brooks Locomotive Works 2-6-0

10,380 lbf (46.2 kN)

Aug.

1881

567[14] Originally, Utah & Northern Ry. #37. Renumbered to 94 in 1885 to conform to Union Pacific Ry. system-wide numbering. Sold to the Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1889 (C&PS 2nd 4).[14] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898 as 1st 2. Larger boiler installed and renumbered to 52 in 1900. Powered the Taku Tram from 1930 to 1936. Retired in 1936 and stored at Atlin, British Columbia until 1964 when it was brought back to Skagway. In 1971 the locomotive was put on display at The United Transportation Union Hall in Skagway, Alaska. In the early 2000s it was taken to storage at the WP&YR shops. In 2014 the locomotive was cosmetically restored and put on display at the WP&YR depot in Skagway.
53

(ex-1st 3)

Grant Locomotive Works 2-8-0

12,876 lbf (57.28 kN)

Jan. or Feb. 1882,[15] more likely Feb. 1882[16] one of ##1443, 1446-1451, 1456-1458,[15] most likely #1451[16] Proposed Denver & Rio Grande R.R. Class C-16, ##230-239 series, locomotive (most likely, #236[16]). Sold instead to the Toledo, Cincinnati & St. Louis R.R. in June 1882 (TC&StL #63).[17] Resold to the Cincinnati Northern Ry. in 1883 (CN #63). Transferred to the Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern Ry. in 1885 (CL&N #63). Repossessed by Grant in June 1887.[18] Sold to the Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. via Barrows & Co. (dealer) in September 1887 (C&PS #9).[19] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898 as 1st 3. Renumbered to 53 in 1900. Retired in 1907. Scrapped in 1918.
54

(ex-1st 4)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-4-0

5,470 lbf (24.3 kN)

Mar.

1878

4294 Earliest-built locomotive to operate on the WP&YR. Originally, Thurston County R.R. Construction Co., d.b.a. "Olympia & Tenino R.R.," #1, E. N. Ouimette. Transferred to Olympia & Chehalis Valley R.R. in 1881 (O&CV #1). Sold to the Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1890 (C&PS #10).[20] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898 as 1st 4. Renumbered to 54 in 1900. Sold to the Tanana Mines Ry. in 1905 (TM #50). The TM Ry. became the Tanana Valley R.R. in 1907 (TV #50). The TV RR was sold to the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1917 (AEC #50). The A.E.C. became The Alaska Railroad in 1923 (ARR #50). Locomotive scrapped in 1930.
55

(ex-5)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

12,150 lbf (54.0 kN)

May

1885

7597 Originally, Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. #8. Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898 as #5. Renumbered to 55 in 1900. Sold to the Klondike Mines Ry. in 1904 (KM #2). The KM Ry. was abandoned in 1913. KM Ry. assets sold to the Yukon Consolidated Gold Corp. in 1925. In 1961 the locomotive was put on display at the Dawson City Museum in Dawson City, Yukon where it remains today.[3]
56

(ex-6)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

16,800 lbf (75 kN)

Jan.

1899

16455 Purchased new. Originally #6. Renumbered to 56 in 1900. Rebuilt from Vauclain compound to simple in 1907. Retired and scrapped in 1938.

Tender tank rebuilt to backward-sloping in 1936. Tender placed behind Loco #61 in 1938.[21] Then in 1949, superstructure placed as riprap along the Skagway River.[13] Retrieved in 1990. Tender superstructure moved adjacent Skagway Museum about 2000.

57

(ex-7)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

15,118 lbf (67.25 kN)

Jan.

1899

16456 Vauclain compound locomotive. Purchased new. Originally #7. Renumbered to 57 in 1900. Sold in 1906 to the Klondike Mines Ry. (KM #3). The KM Ry. was abandoned in 1913. KM Ry. assets sold to the Yukon Consolidated Gold Corp. in 1925. In 1961 the locomotive was put on display at the Dawson City Museum in Dawson City, Yukon and is still there today.[3]

Tender returned to WP&YR in 1942, and assigned to Rotary #2 from 1942 to 1944. Tender placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1949.[13]

59 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0

15,400 lbf (69 kN)

May

1900

17749 Purchased new. Retired and scrapped in 1941.

Tender cut down to Flatcar 1st 100 in 1942.

60 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0

15,400 lbf (69 kN)

May

1900

17750 Purchased new. Retired in 1942. In 1949 the locomotive was buried in the Skagway River to stabilize the track bed. Retrieved and moved to storage at the WP&YR shops in Skagway in 1990, and remains there today.

Tender placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1949.[13] Retrieved in 1990. Tender superstructure moved adjacent Skagway Museum about 2000.[22]

61 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

17,600 lbf (78 kN)

June

1900

17814 Purchased new.[23] Retired in 1944. Placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1949. Retrieved in 1990. Sold to Mid-West Locomotive & Machine Works in Wisconsin in 2007. Traded to Stockton Locomotive Works in 2017.

Received the slope backed tender from Loco #56 in 1938.[21] Superstructure of slope backed tender placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1949.[13] Retrieved in 1990. Tender superstructure moved adjacent Skagway Museum about 2000.

62 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0

14,600 lbf (65 kN)

June

1900

17895 Purchased new. Retired in 1945. Placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1949.

Tender reassigned to Loco #66 in 1947. Tender superstructure subsequently placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1951.[13] Tender underframe used to make Flatcar #1200 in 1957.

63 Brooks Locomotive Works 2-6-0

8,400 lbf (37 kN)

Apr.

1881

522 Originally, Kansas Central R.R. #7, Sidney Dillon. Renumbered to 102 in 1885 to conform to Union Pacific Ry. system-wide numbering. KC RR converted to standard gauge in 1890.[24] Locomotive sold to F.M. Hicks & Co. (dealer) after 1896. Purchased from Hicks by the WP&YR in 1900.[25] Sold to the Klondike Mines Ry. in 1902 (KM #1). The KM Ry. was abandoned in 1913. KM Ry. assets sold to the Yukon Consolidated Gold Corp. in 1925. Locomotive put on display at Dawson City, Yukon in 1961.[3]
64 Hinkley Locomotive Works 2-6-0

7,802 lbf (34.71 kN)

Nov.

1888

1781 Built as a 2-6-0.[26] Originally, North Western Coal & Navigation Co. #10. NWC&N was sold to the Alberta Railway & Coal Co. in 1891. Locomotive reduced to an 0-6-0, most likely in 1893 to accommodate dual gauge coupler fixtures.[27] Restored to a 2-6-0 and sold to the Columbia & Western Ry. in 1896 (C&W #2). The C&W was taken over by the Canadian Pacific Ry. in 1898. The CP Ry. designated the locomotive 2nd 506, but never physically renumbered it.[28] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1900. Retired in 1907. Scrapped in 1918.
65 Brooks Locomotive Works 2-6-0

8,480 lbf (37.7 kN)

Sep.

1881

578 Originally, Kansas Central R.R. #8, L. T. Smith. Renumbered to 103 in 1885 to conform to Union Pacific Ry. system-wide numbering. Sold to the Columbia & Western Ry. in 1896 (C&W #3).[24] The C&W was taken over by the Canadian Pacific Ry. in 1898. The CP Ry. designated the locomotive 2nd 507, but never physically renumbered it.[28] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1900. Sold to the Tanana Mines Ry. in 1906 (TM #51). The TM Ry. became the Tanana Valley R.R. in 1907 (TV #51). The TV RR was sold to the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1917 (AEC #51). The A.E.C. became The Alaska Railroad in 1923 (ARR #51). Locomotive scrapped in 1930.
66 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0

15,400 lbf (69 kN)

May

1901

18964 Purchased new.[29] Retired in 1952. Placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1967.

Original tender wrecked near Fraser in 1947, and left there until at least 1990.[30] Locomotive received the tender from Loco #62 in 1947. The superstructure from the ex-#62 tender placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1951.[13] Then, Loco #66 received another tender superstructure in 1951 from the original tender of Loco #69 The ex-#69 superstructure was placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1957.[13] Tender underframe (ex-#62) used to make Flatcar #1200 in 1957.

67 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0

15,400 lbf (69 kN)

May

1901

18965 Purchased new.[29] Retired in 1941. Placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1951.

Tender cut down to Flatcar #101 in 1942.

68 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

24,000 lbf (110 kN)

June

1907

30998 Purchased new. Severely damaged by rock slide in 1917 and retired.[31] Scrapped in 1938.
69 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-0

23,962 lbf (106.59 kN)

Apr.

1908

32962 Purchased new. Nicknamed Gila Monster by the 770th Railway Operating Battalion during World War II.[32] Retired in 1954. Sold to the Black Hills Central R.R. in 1956. (BHC #69, Klondike Casey). Resold to the Nebraska Midland Ry. in 1973 (NM #69).[31] Last run by NM Ry. in 1990. Sold back to the WP&YR in 2001. Returned to service on the WP&YR in 2008.

Received a hybrid tender in 1951. Hybrid underframe from the pre-1951 tender of Loco #71.[8] Hybrid superstructure had been from the tender of Sumpter Valley Ry. Loco #50 (1916). Ex-SV #50 tender delivered with WP&YR Loco 1st 81 in 1941. Assigned to Rotary #2 from 1947 to 1951. Ex-SV #50 tender superstructure used to make #69 replacement tender in 1951.[33]

70 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

21,600 lbf (96 kN)

May

1938

62234 Purchased new. Retired in 1963. Sold to Silver Dollar City in 1977 (SDC #70).[4] S.D.C. sold out to Dollywood in 1986 (Dollywood #70, Cinderella).[34]

Received the tender from Loco #194 in 1950.[35][36] Loco #70’s original tender assigned to Rotary #1 from 1950 to 1953, assigned to Loco #190 from 1953 to 1960,[8] and used to make Flatcar #1201 in 1962.

71 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

21,600 lbf (96 kN)

Jan.

1939

62257 Purchased new. Retired in 1963. Sold to Silver Dollar City in 1977 (SDC #71).[4] S.D.C. sold out to Dollywood in 1986 (Dollywood #71, Beatrice).[34] Locomotive currently stored inoperable at the Dollywood backshop.

Received the tender from Loco #196 in 1951.[35][37] Then in 1977, Loco #71 exchanged tenders with Loco #192 (i.e., received ex-#69/#71 hybrid tender, by Silver Dollar City). Hybrid tender scrapped between 1986 & 1999.

72 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

21,600 lbf (96 kN)

May

1947

73351 Purchased new. Retired in 1964. Used as a stationary boiler from 1964 to 1969. Severely damaged in the 1969 Skagway roundhouse fire. All but its chassis was scrapped in 1974. The chassis was sold to Silver Dollar City in 1977. S.D.C. sold out to Dollywood in 1986.[34] Chassis scrapped in 1999.

Original tender from one of Loco ##191, 193, 195, 197.[35]

73 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

21,600 lbf (96 kN)

May

1947

73352 Purchased new. Retired in 1964. Put on display at Bennett, British Columbia in 1968. Moved to Whitehorse, Yukon for restoration in 1979. Restored to service in 1982.[2] Operable.

Original tender from one of Loco ####191, 193, 195, 197.[35]

80 American Locomotive Company 2-8-2

19,000 lbf (85 kN)

July

1920

61980 Originally, Sumpter Valley Ry. 2nd 101. Renumbered to 20 in 1920. Purchased by the WP&YR in 1940.[38] Shipped to Skagway in 1941. Retired in 1958. Sold to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1977 (SV #20).[4][39]

Delivered to WP&YR in 1941 with the tender from SV 2-8-2 Loco #18 (Baldwin 1916). Then in 1947, Loco #80 received the tender from one of Loco ####191, 193, 195, 197.[35] The 1947 tender sold to SV RR in 1977, and returned to WP&YR in 1990 as a spare for Loco #73. Then in 1993, SV RR Loco #20 (by now ex-WP&YR #80) received the former tender of SV Loco #19.[39]

1st 81 American Locomotive Company 2-8-2

19,000 lbf (85 kN)

July

1920

61981 Originally, Sumpter Valley Ry. 2nd 102. Renumbered to 19 in 1920. Purchased by the WP&YR in 1940.[38] Shipped to Skagway in 1941. Retired in 1957. Sold to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1977 (SV #19).[4] Restored to operation on SV RR in 1995.[39]

Delivered to WP&YR in 1941 with the tender from SV 4-6-0 Loco #50 (Baldwin 1916). Then in 1947, Loco 1st 81 received the tender from one of Loco ####191, 193, 195, 197.[35] The 1947 tender put on display in 1962 with Loco #195. Then in 1993, SV RR Loco #19 (by now ex-WP&YR 1st 81) received the former tender of SV Loco #20.[39]

Proposed USA 152 Baldwin Locomotive Works 4-6-0

10,000 lbf (44 kN)

June

1920

53296 Originally, Alaskan Engineering Commission #152. The A.E.C. became The Alaska Railroad in 1923. Locomotive acquired by the U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR, shipped to Skagway, Alaska, but not off loaded. Instead, shipped to Lathrop (California) Army Depot. Sold to M. Davidson Co. (dealer) in 1946. Resold to the Antelope & Western R.R. in 1951 (A&W #2). Transferred to the Camino, Cable & Northern R.R. in 1963 (CC&N #2). Resold to the Keystone Locomotive Co. in 1974. Resold to the Huckleberry R.R. in 1975 (Huckleberry #2).[4]
190

(ex-USA 190)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69425 U.S. Army Class S118. Originally, USA #190, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Sold to the WP&YR in 1946. Sold to the Tweetsie Railroad in 1960 (Tweetsie #190, Yukon Queen).[41]

Exchanged tenders with Rotary #1 (i.e., received Loco #70’s original tender) in 1953.[8][35] Then in 1960, former tender of Loco #80 (ex-SV #18 tender) sold to Tweetsie R.R.,[33] along with Loco #190, instead of the ex-Loco #70 tender.

191

(ex-USA 191)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69426 U.S. Army Class S118. Originally, USA #191, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Retired in 1946. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947. Scrapped in 1951.[41]

Tender reassigned to one of Loco ##72, 73, 80, 1st 81 in 1947.[35]

192

(ex-USA 192)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69427 U.S. Army Class S118. Originally, USA #192, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946. Retired in 1957. Sold to the Rebel R.R. in 1960 (R RR #192).[41] The Rebel R.R. sold out to Gold Rush Junction in 1970 (GRJ #192). G.R.J. sold out to Silver Dollar City in 1977 (SDC #192). S.D.C. sold out to Dollywood in 1986 (Dollywood #192, Klondike Katie).[34]

Exchanged tenders with Rotary #2 (thereby receiving hybrid tender) in 1953.[35] Hybrid tender consisted of underframe from Loco #69’s original tender, and superstructure from Loco #71’s original tender.[8] Then in 1977, Loco #192 exchanged tenders with Loco #71 (i.e., received Loco #196’s original tender, by Silver Dollar City). Loco #192’s original tender sold to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1977, and returned to WP&YR in 1990 as a spare for Loco #73.

193

(ex-USA 193)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69428 U.S. Army Class S118. Originally, USA #193, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Retired in 1946. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947. Scrapped in 1951.[41]

Tender reassigned to one of Loco ##72, 73, 80, 1st 81 in 1947.[35]

194

(ex-USA 194)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69429 U.S. Army Class S118. Originally, USA #194, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Retired in 1944. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947. Scrapped in 1951.[41]

Tender assigned to a rotary from 1944 to 1947.[42] Tender reassigned back to Loco #194 in 1947. Tender reassigned to Loco #70 in 1950.[36]

195

(ex-USA 195)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69430 U.S. Army Class S118. Originally, USA #195, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Retired in 1946. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947. Put on display adjacent to Skagway Museum in 1962.[41]

Tender reassigned to one of Loco ##72, 73, 80, 1st 81 in 1947.[35] Tender from 1st 81 (may or may not be ex-#195) put on display in 1962 with Loco #195.

196

(ex-USA 196)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69431 U.S. Army Class S118. Originally, USA #196, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946. Retired in 1951. Placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1967.[41]

Tender assigned to Loco #71 from 1951 to 1977.[37] Then, tender reassigned to Loco #192 in 1977 (by Silver Dollar City).

197

(ex-USA 197)

Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69432 U.S. Army Class S118. Originally, USA #197, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Retired in 1946. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947. Scrapped in 1951.[41]

Tender reassigned to one of Loco ##72, 73, 80, 1st 81 in 1947.[35]

USA 198 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69433 U.S. Army Class S118. Purchased new by the U.S. Army, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Retired in 1944. Shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1945. Sold to the Ferrocarril Casa Grande-Sausal of Chicama, Peru in 1948 (CG-S #32).[41][43] The CG-S was abandoned in 1970.[44] Locomotive scrapped between 1970 & 2003.
USA 199 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69434 U.S. Army Class S118. Purchased new by the U.S. Army, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Retired in 1944. Shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1945. Sold to the Ferrocarril Casa Grande-Sausal of Chicama, Peru in 1948 (CG-S #18).[41][43] The CG-S was abandoned in 1970.[44] Locomotive scrapped between 1970 & 2003.
USA 200 Baldwin Locomotive Works 2-8-2

16,000 lbf (71 kN)

Feb.

1943

69435 U.S. Army Class S118. Purchased new by the U.S. Army, and used by the Army on the WP&YR.[40] Retired in 1944. Shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1945. Sold to the Ferrocarril Casa Grande-Sausal of Chicama, Peru in 1948 (CG-S #19).[41][43] The CG-S was abandoned in 1970.[44] Locomotive scrapped between 1979 & 2003.
USA 250 American Locomotive Co. 2-8-2

22,700 lbf (101 kN)

Sep.

1923

64981 Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. Class K-28. Originally, D&RGW #470. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[45]
USA 251 American Locomotive Co. 2-8-2

22,700 lbf (101 kN)

Sep.

1923

64982 Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. Class K-28. Originally, D&RGW #471. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[45]
USA 252 American Locomotive Co. 2-8-2

22,700 lbf (101 kN)

Sep.

1923

64983 Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. Class K-28. Originally, D&RGW #472. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR. Wrecked and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[45]
USA 253 American Locomotive Co. 2-8-2

22,700 lbf (101 kN)

Sep.

1923

64985 Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. Class K-28. Originally, D&RGW #474. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR. On February 5, 1943, en route from Prince Rupert, British Columbia, to Skagway, Alaska, it sank on a barge during an ice storm at Haines, Alaska. Recovered 13 days later. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[45]
USA 254 American Locomotive Co. 2-8-2

22,700 lbf (101 kN)

Sep.

1923

64986 Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. Class K-28. Originally, D&RGW #475. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[45]
USA 255 American Locomotive Co. 2-8-2

22,700 lbf (101 kN)

Sep.

1923

64988 Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. Class K-28. Originally, D&RGW#477. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[45]
USA 256 American Locomotive Co. 2-8-2

22,700 lbf (101 kN)

Sep.

1923

64990[46] Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. Class K-28. Originally, D&RGW #479. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR. Retired and shipped out of Skagway, Alaska in 1944. Scrapped in 1946.[45]

[47][48][49][50][51]

White Pass gasoline-mechanical locomotives[edit]

Locomotives with dark grey have been scrapped, while locomotives with light grey have been either put on display, or sold to other railroads.

Number or Name Builder Horse-
power
AAR Type Date Built Shop No. Remarks
Ford Tram Westminster Iron Works 90 hp (67 kW) B 1937 68 No train brake. Has a Ford Motor Co. V-8 engine. Purchased new. Powered the Taku Tram from 1937 to 1950. Operated at Carcross, Yukon, tie plant from 1952 to 1982. Retired in 1982. Cannibalized.
2nd 3 Skagit Steel & Iron Works (Motor Appliance Corp.) 27 hp (20 kW) B 1924 No train brake. Had a Fordson tractor engine. Originally, owned by Charles H. Frye and leased to Frye Lettuce Farms, Inc. Frye Lettuce went bankrupt in 1934. Locomotive purchased by the WP&YR in 1936. Relegated to Shops use only. Retired in 1943. Scrapped in 1946.
3rd 3

(ex-USA 7651)

Plymouth Locomotive Works 175 hp (130 kW) B July

1942

4471 Plymouth Model ML6-25. LeRoi, Inc. RX15-C7 engine. Originally, U.S. Army #7651 and operated on the Kuparuk Ry. in Nome, Alaska. Shipped to Skagway, Alaska in 1943. Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (WP&YR 3rd 3). Severely damaged in the 1969 Skagway roundhouse fire. Scrapped in 1970.

[48][49][50][51][52]

White Pass diesel-electric locomotives[edit]

Locomotives with dark grey have been scrapped, while locomotives with light grey have been either put on display, or sold to other railroads.

Number Builder Horse-
power
AAR Type Date Built Shop No. Remarks
2nd 1 General Electric Co. 150 hp (110 kW) B June

1947

29191 GE Phase 3b 25-Tonner. No train brake. Cummins Engine Co. HBI-600 prime mover. Originally, Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. #6. Purchased by the WP&YR in 1969. Retired in 1979. Donated to the British Columbia Forest Museum in 1985. Sold back to WP&YR and moved to Hamilton Mfg. Co. at Sedro-Woolley, Washington in 2013.
2nd 2 General Electric Co. 150 hp (110 kW) B June

1947

29195 GE Phase 3b 25-Tonner. No train brake. Cummins Engine Co. HBI-600 prime mover. Originally, Colorado Fuel & Iron Co. #10. Purchased by the WP&YR in 1969. Retired in 1972. Scrapped in 1985.
2nd 81 General Electric Co. 800 hp (600 kW) C-C June

1957

32933 Convertible gauge locomotive. Alco Products, Inc. 6-251A prime mover. Originally, U.S. Army #3000. Operated on the Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. from 1957 to 1960. Purchased by the WP&YR in 1973. Retired in 1980. Sold to Bandegua (Guatemala subsidiary of Del Monte Fresh Produce, N.A.) in 1981 (Bandegua #314). Scrapped by 2006.
90 General Electric Co. 1,400 hp (1,000 kW) C-C June

1954

32060 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251A prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CERES 140 by Coast Engine & Equipment Co. with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2009.
91 General Electric Co. 1,450 hp (1,080 kW) C-C June

1954

32061 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251A prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CLEAR 140 by Global Locomotive LLC with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2010.
92 General Electric Co. 1,450 hp (1,080 kW) C-C Dec.

1956

32709 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CLEAR 140 by Sygnet Rail Technologies, LLC with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2012.
93 General Electric Co. 1,450 hp (1,080 kW) C-C Dec.

1956

32710 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Colt Industries, Fairbanks Morse Div. 6-251 prime mover installed in 1998. Converted to CLEAR 140 by Sygnet Rail Technologies, LLC with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2012.
94 General Electric Co. 1,450 hp (1,080 kW) C-C Dec.

1956

32711 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CLEAR 140 by Sygnet Rail Technologies, LLC with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2011.
95 General Electric Co. 1,450 hp (1,080 kW) C-C Mar.

1963

34592 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CLEAR 140 by Sygnet Rail Technologies, LLC with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2013.
96 General Electric Co. 1,450 hp (1,080 kW) C-C Mar.

1963

34593 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CLEAR 140 by Sygnet Rail Technologies, LLC with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2013.
97 General Electric Co. 1,450 hp (1,080 kW) C-C Mar.

1963

34594 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CLEAR 140 by Sygnet Rail Technologies, LLC with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2011.
98 General Electric Co. 1,400 hp (1,000 kW) C-C May

1966

35790 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CERES 140 by Coast Engine & Equipment Co. with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2009.
99 General Electric Co. 1,450 hp (1,080 kW) C-C May

1966

35791 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Converted to CLEAR 140 by Global Locomotive LLC with Cummins Engine Co. QSK45L prime mover in 2010.
100 General Electric Co. 990 hp (740 kW) C-C May

1966

35792 Originally, GE pattern GEX3341[53] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251B prime mover. Purchased new. Scrapped in 2015. Prime mover rebuilt and installed in #101 in 2015.
101 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C May

1969

6023-01 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E,[55] with Alco Products, Inc. 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new. Sold to Sociedad Colombiana de Transport Ferroviaro S.A. in 1992 (STF #1101). Repurchased by the WP&YR in 1999 (#101). Prime mover replaced by rebuilt prime mover from #100 in 2015.
102 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C May

1969

6023-02 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E.[55] Alco Products, Inc. 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new. Severely damaged in the 1969 Skagway roundhouse fire. Scrapped in 1993.
103 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C May

1969

6023-03 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E.[55] Alco Products, Inc. 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new. Sold to Sociedad Colombiana de Transport Ferroviaro S.A. in 1992 (STF #1105). Repurchased by the WP&YR in 1999 (#103).
104 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C May

1969

6023-04 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E.[55] Alco Products, Inc. 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new. Sold to Sociedad Colombiana de Transport Ferroviaro S.A. in 1992 (STF #1104). Repurchased by the WP&YR in 1999 (#104).
105 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C May

1969

6023-05 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E.[55] Alco Products, Inc. 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new. Severely damaged in the 1969 Skagway roundhouse fire. Scrapped in 1993.
106 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C May

1969

6023-06 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E.[55] Alco Products, Inc. 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new. Sold to Sociedad Colombiana de Transport Ferroviaro S.A. in 1992 (STF #1106). Repurchased by the WP&YR in 1999 (#106).
107 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C May

1969

6023-07 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E.[55] Alco Products, Inc. 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new. Sold to Sociedad Colombiana de Transport Ferroviaro S.A. in 1992 (STF #1107). Repurchased by the WP&YR in 1999 (#107).
108 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C Dec.

1971

6054-01 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E. MLW 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new.
109 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C Dec.

1971

6054-02 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E. MLW 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new.
110 Montreal Locomotive Works 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C Dec.

1971

6054-03 MLW-Worthington Model Series C-14,[54] Specification DL-535E. MLW 6-251D prime mover. Purchased new.
Proposed 111 Bombardier Inc.
(bought MLW in 1975)
1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C July

1982

6123-01 Bombardier Specification DL-535E(W). Bombardier 6-251D prime mover. Stored at Soulanges Industries, Les Cedres, Quebec from 1982 until 1993. Sold to United States Gypsum Co. in 1993 (USG #111). Operable.
Proposed 112 Bombardier Inc. 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C July

1982

6123-02 Bombardier Specification DL-535E(W). Bombardier 6-251D prime mover. Stored at Soulanges Industries, Les Cedres, Quebec from 1982 until 1991. Sold to United States Gypsum Co. in 1991 (USG #112). Operable.
Proposed 113 Bombardier Inc. 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C July

1982

6123-03 Bombardier Specification DL-535E(W). Bombardier 6-251D prime mover. Stored at Soulanges Industries, Les Cedres, Quebec from 1982 until 1991. Sold to United States Gypsum Co. in 1991 (USG #113). Destroyed in an accident in 1992.
114 Bombardier Inc. 1,200 hp (890 kW) C-C July

1982

6123-04 Bombardier Specification DL-535E(W). Bombardier 6-251D prime mover. Stored at Soulanges Industries, Les Cedres, Quebec from 1982 until 1991. Purchased by the WP&YR in 1995. Operable. Damaged in 2006 derailment.

[49][50][51][52][56]

White Pass passenger cars[edit]

Cars with dark grey have been scrapped, while cars with light grey have been either put on display, or sold to other railroads.

Number Name Builder Date

Built

Remarks
1 ........ WP&YR 1900 Open observation car. Single 4-wheel truck. No air brake. Used on the Taku Tram. Converted to a flat car in 1937. Retired in 1951.
2 ........ Chassis: Ford Motor Co.;

powered front truck and idler wheels at rear: WP&YR

1935 Self-propelled, 85 hp (63 kW) gasoline-mechanical, Ford Motor Co. V-8 engine. Made from 1934 Ford chassis and a bus body. No train brake. Demolished due to a derailment in 1942. Scrapped in 1943.
X3 ........ American Car & Foundry Co., Lot #8339.[57]

(St. Charles)

1918 Baggage Car, used on the WP&YR exclusively as a Tool Car. Originally, Sumpter Valley Ry. Baggage Car #5. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #932). Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#932). Renumbered to X3 in 1947. Scrapped in 1971.
5 The Red Line Beartown Mechanical Design 1998 Self-propelled, 436 hp (325 kW) Diesel-hydraulic, Caterpillar Inc. Model 3406 engine. Purchased new. Sold to Miles Canyon Historic Ry. Society in 2004.
1st 200 1st Lake Fraser (1945-1968) WP&YR 1902 Business car from 1902 to 1941. Passenger car from 1941 to 1954. Work Car #X16 from 1954 to 1969, but not physically renumbered. Scrapped in 1968.
2nd 200 2nd Lake Summit WP&YR 1992 Built up from Flat Car #497, 498, or 499.[58] Equipped with wheelchair lift.
1st 201 ........ ........ ........ See, 1st 205.
2nd 201 ........ WP&YR 1900 Baggage Car. Destroyed in a runaway in 1938.
3rd 201 Lake Crater WP&YR 1992 Built up from Flat Car #497, 498, or 499.[58] Equipped with wheelchair lift.
1st 202 ........ J. Hammond Car Co.[59] 1887[59] Combine. Originally, Olympia & Chehalis Valley R.R. Sold to Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1890 (C&PS #5 or 6).[60] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898. Sold to Klondike Mines Ry. in 1904 (KM #200). The KM Ry. was abandoned in 1913. KM Ry. assets sold to the Yukon Consolidated Gold Corp. in 1925. Car destroyed by fire between 1947 & 1949.[3]
2nd 202 Lake Bare Loon WP&YR 1992 Built up from Flat Car #497, 498, or 499.[58] Equipped with wheelchair lift.
1st 203 ........ ........ ........ See, #272.
2nd 203 Lake Fantail WP&YR 1993 Built up from one of Flat Cars ##470-477.[58] Equipped with wheelchair lift.
1st 204 ........ Billmeyer & Small Co.[61] 1882[62] Originally, Addison & Northern Pennsylvania Ry. Sold to Barrows & Co. (dealer) in 1887. (Mr. Barrows was a director of the Addison & Pennsylvania Ry., which purchased the A&NP under foreclosure, in the same year.) Car moved to the Billmeyer factory at York, Pennsylvania, for renovation.[63] Resold to the Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1888 (C&PS #3 or 4).[64] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898. Sold to the Tanana Mines Ry. in 1905 (TM #204). The TM Ry. became the Tanana Valley R.R. in 1907 (TV #204). Car wrecked in 1916.[65]
2nd 204 Lake Chilkoot WP&YR 1993 Built up from one of Flat Cars ##470-477.[58]
1st 205 ........ Seattle & Walla Walla R.R.[66] 1877[66] Baggage Car. Originally, S&WW #2.[66] Transferred to Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1880. Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898 (1st 201). Renumbered to 1st 205 in 1900. Cupola added in 1925. Destroyed in a wreck in 1943.
2nd 205 Lake Chilkat WP&YR 1993 Built up from one of Flat Cars ##470-477.[58]
1st 206 ........ J. Hammond Car Co.[59] 1887[59] Originally, Olympia & Chehalis Valley R.R. Sold to Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1890 (C&PS #5 or 6).[60] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898. Sold to the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1918. The A.E.C. became The Alaska Railroad in 1923. The Alaska Railroad's narrow gauge branch was abandoned in 1930. Car presumed to have been scrapped thereafter.
2nd 206 Lake Nares WP&YR 1993 Built up from one of Flat Cars ##470-477.[58]
1st 207 ........ ........ ........ See, #270.
2nd 207 Lake Morrow WP&YR 1994 Built up from one of Flat Cars ##470-477.[58] Equipped with wheelchair lift.
1st 208 ........ Billmeyer & Small Co.[61] 1882[62] Originally, Addison & Northern Pennsylvania Ry. Sold to Barrows & Co. (dealer) in 1887. (Mr. Barrows was a director of the Addison & Pennsylvania Ry., which purchased the A&NP under foreclosure, in the same year.) Car moved to the Billmeyer factory at York, Pennsylvania, for renovation.[63] Resold to the Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1888 (C&PS #3 or 4).[64] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898. Sold to the Klondike Mines Ry. in 1904 (KM #202). The KM Ry. was abandoned in 1913. KM Ry. assets sold to the Yukon Consolidated Gold Corp. in 1925. Car destroyed by fire between 1947 & 1949.[3]
2nd 208 Lake Homan WP&YR 1994 Built up from one of Flat Cars ##470-477.[58]
1st 209 ........ ........ ........ See, #267.
2nd 209 Lake Bernard WP&YR 1994 Built up from one of Flat Cars ##470-477.[58]
210 ........ Seattle & Walla Walla R.R.[66] 1876[66] Earliest-built rolling stock to operate on the WP&YR. Originally, S&WW Coach #1.[66] Transferred to Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. in 1880 (C&PS #1).[67] Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898. Sold to the Tanana Mines Ry. in 1905 (TM #100). The TM Ry. became the Tanana Valley R.R. in 1907 (TV #200). The TV RR was sold to the Alaskan Engineering Commission in 1917 (AEC #200). The A.E.C. became The Alaska Railroad in 1923 (ARR #200).[65] The Alaska Railroad's narrow gauge branch was abandoned in 1930. Car presumed to have been scrapped thereafter.
211 Combo

(since 2017)

American Car & Foundry Co., Lot #8338.[57]

(St. Charles)

1918 Combine. Originally, Sumpter Valley Ry. #11. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #934). Tool car from 1943 to 1946. Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#211). Returned to passenger service, and cupola added in 1946.
212 ........ Carter Brothers[68] 1884[68] Originally, Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. #2. Acquired by the WP&YR in 1898. Destroyed by the 1932 Skagway roundhouse fire.
214 Lake Spirit (since 1988) J.G. Brill & Co.[69][70] about Nov. 1881[70] Originally, Texas & St. Louis Ry. (#22 or 24).[70][71] Sold to Coeur d’Alene Ry. & Navigation Co. in 1886 (CdAR&N #1 or 2).[71][72][73] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1900. Cupola added in 1971. Cupola removed in 1988.
216 Lake Black (since 1996) J.G. Brill & Co.[69][70] about Nov. 1881[70] Originally, Texas & St. Louis Ry. (#22 or 24).[70][71] Sold to Coeur d’Alene Ry. & Navigation Co. in 1886 (CdAR&N #1 or 2).[71][72][73] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1900. Cupola added in 1967. Cupola removed in 1996.
218 Lake Atlin (since 1945) Jackson & Sharp Co. June 1881[74][75] Nos. 218 and 220 are the oldest operating rolling stock on the WP&YR. Originally, Stony Clove & Catskill Mountain R.R. Sold to F.M. Hicks & Co. (dealer) in 1899 or 1900.[74][75] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1901.[23][29] (Not from the Los Angeles & Redondo Ry.–the LA&R sold its 3 ft. gauge cars in 1902, 1½ years after this car had been purchased, and it had not owned any J&S cars.[76])
220 Lake Dewey (since 1945) Jackson & Sharp Co. June 1881[74][75] Nos. 218 and 220 are the oldest operating rolling stock on the WP&YR. Originally, Stony Clove & Catskill Mountain R.R. Sold to F.M. Hicks & Co. (dealer) in 1899 or 1900.[74][75] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1901.[23][29] (Not from the Los Angeles & Redondo Ry.–the LA&R sold its 3 ft. gauge cars in 1902, 1½ years after this car had been purchased, and it had not owned any J&S cars.[76])
222 Lake Lindeman (since 1945) Jackson & Sharp Co. 1883[75][77] Originally, Kaaterskill R.R.[78] (The Kaaterskill R.R. was a connecting subsidiary of the Stony Clove & Catskill Mountain R.R.) Coaches sold to F.M. Hicks & Co. (dealer) in 1899 or 1900.[75][77] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1901.[23][29] (Not from the Los Angeles & Redondo Ry.–the LA&R sold its 3 ft. gauge cars in 1902, 1½ years after this car had been purchased, and it had not owned any J&S cars.[76])
224 Lake Marsh (since 1945) Jackson & Sharp Co. 1883[75][77] Originally, Kaaterskill R.R.[78] (The Kaaterskill R.R. was a connecting subsidiary of the Stony Clove & Catskill Mountain R.R.) Coaches sold to F.M. Hicks & Co. (dealer) in 1899 or 1900.[75][77] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1901.[23][29] (Not from the Los Angeles & Redondo Ry.–the LA&R sold its 3 ft. gauge cars in 1902, 1½ years after this car had been purchased, and it had not owned any J&S cars.[76])
226 2nd Lake Fraser (since 1962) WP&YR 1903 Work car from 1960 to 1962.
228 ........ WP&YR 1904 Destroyed by the 1932 Skagway roundhouse fire.
1st 230 ........ WP&YR 1908 Open observation car from 1908 to 1921. Walled-in, in 1921. Passenger car from 1921 to 1942. Work car from 1942 to 1943. Destroyed by fire in 1943.
2nd 230 Lake Big Kalzes Underframe: American Car & Foundry Co., Lot #TC-3263;[79]

body: WP&YR

2002 Built upon the underframe of Tank Car #68 or 70.[79] Open observation car from 2002 to 2005. Walled-in, in 2005.
232 ........ WP&YR 1908 Open observation car from 1908 to 1942. Used on the Taku Tram from 1917 to 1936. Walled-in, in 1942. Work car from 1942 to 1962. Renumbered to X6 in 1947. Scrapped in 1962.
234 Lake Cowley (since 1952) most likely, Nevada-California-Oregon Ry.[80] 1892[81] Originally, N-C-O #6.[82] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1916. Work car from 1945 to 1952. #X7 from 1947 to 1952. Back to Passenger Car #234 in 1952.
236 Lake Mayo (since 1945) Harlan & Hollingsworth Corp. 1887 Originally, South Pacific Coast R.R. #66. Sold to Nevada-California-Oregon Ry. via Atlantic Equipment Co. (dealer) in 1909 (N-C-O 2nd 4[82]). Purchased by the WP&YR in 1916.
238 Lake Watson (since 1951) WP&YR 1922 ........
240 Lake Bennett (since 1945) St. Charles Car Co. 1884 Originally, Arizona & New Mexico Ry. #3. Sold to Coronado R.R. in 1901 (C RR #3). The Coronado R.R. was abandoned in 1923. Car resold to United Commercial Co. (dealer). Purchased by the WP&YR in 1925.
242 Lake Teslin (since 1945) American Car & Foundry Co. (Jeffersonville) 1903 Originally, Coronado R.R. #7. The Coronado R.R. was abandoned in 1923. Car sold to United Commercial Co. (dealer). Purchased by the WP&YR in 1925.
244 2nd Lake Emerald (since 1962) Carter Brothers 1884[83] Originally, South Pacific Coast R.R. #59. Sold to Northwestern Pacific R.R. in 1908 (NWP #731). Car purchased by the WP&YR in 1927.[84] Work car from 1960 to 1962. Converted back to passenger car in 1962.
246 ........ ........ ........ See, #264.
248 Lake Tagish (since 1945) Harlan & Hollingsworth Corp. 1887 Originally, South Pacific Coast R.R. #65. Sold to Northwestern Pacific R.R. in 1907 (NWP #728). Car purchased by the WP&YR in 1928.[84] Used on the Taku Tram from 1928 to 1936.
250 ........ Pullman Co., Lot #C1073, Plan #253.[85] 1885 Originally, North Pacific Coast R.R. #22. The NPC became the North Shore R.R. in 1902 (NS #22). NS RR merged into the Northwestern Pacific R.R. in 1907 (NWP #713). Car purchased by the WP&YR in 1930.[84][86] Destroyed by the 1932 Skagway roundhouse fire.
252 Lake Muncho (since 1951) Pullman Co., Lot #C1073, Plan #253.[85] 1885 Originally, North Pacific Coast R.R. #26. The NPC became the North Shore R.R. in 1902 (NS #26). NS RR merged into the Northwestern Pacific R.R. in 1907 (NWP #716).[84][86] Car purchased by the WP&YR in 1930.
254 Lake Dezadeash (since 1963)

(1st Lake Emerald, 1951-1957)

Pullman Co., Lot #C1073, Plan #253.[85] 1885 Originally, North Pacific Coast R.R. #27. The NPC became the North Shore R.R. in 1902 (NS #27). NS RR merged into the Northwestern Pacific R.R. in 1907 (NWP #717).[86] Car purchased by the WP&YR in 1934.[84] Renumbered to X18, and its use of the name Lake Emerald was discontinued in 1957. Work Car from 1957 to 1963. Converted back to passenger car and reassumed the #254 in 1963. However, in 1962, the name Lake Emerald had been reassigned to #244. Therefore, #254 was assigned the name Lake Dezadeash in 1963.
256 Lake LeBarge (since 1945) Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1936 Purchased new.
258 Lake Kluane (since 1945) J. Hammond Car Co. 1893 Originally, Pacific Coast Ry. #102. Purchased by the WP&YR in 1937.[20]
260 Lake Tutshi (since 1945) J. Hammond Car Co. 1893 Originally, Pacific Coast Ry. #103.[20] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1937.
262 1st Lake Summit (1950-1969) J. Hammond Car Co. 1893 Originally, Pacific Coast Ry. #105.[20] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1937 as #105. Work car from 1937 to 1947. Renumbered to B05 in 1947. Later in 1947, converted back to a passenger car and renumbered to 262. Destroyed by the 1969 Skagway roundhouse fire.
264 Lake Aishihik (since 1948) Carter Brothers 1885 Originally, San Joaquin & Sierra Nevada R.R. Ettie. SJ&SN merged into the Northern Ry. in 1888 (Northern Ry. #1011). Northern Ry. merged into the Southern Pacific Co. in 1898 (SP #1011). Car leased to the South Pacific Coast R.R. from 1904 to 1906. Leased to the Nevada & California Ry. from 1906 to 1908.[87] Sold to Northwestern Pacific R.R. in 1908 (NWP #732). Purchased by the WP&YR in 1927 as #246.[84] Renumbered to 264 in 1948.
266 Lake Schwatka (since 1963) American Car & Foundry Co.

(St. Charles), Lot #8337.[57]

1918 Originally, Sumpter Valley Ry. Coach #25. Purchased by the WP&YR in 1947 as #X5. Work car from 1947 to 1963. Converted back to a passenger car and renumbered to 266 in 1963.
267 Lake Portage (since 1988) American Car & Foundry Co.

(St. Charles), Lot #8338.[57]

1918 Originally, Sumpter Valley Ry. Combine #10. Purchased by the U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #933). Tool car from 1943 to 1946. Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (1st 209). Returned to passenger service, and cupola added in 1946. Cupola removed, and converted to full-length passenger car in 1982. Renumbered to 267 in 1992.
268 Lake Lewes (since 1966) American Car & Foundry Co.

(St. Charles), Lot #8337.[57]

1918 Originally, Sumpter Valley Ry. Coach #26. Converted to a passenger and railway post office combine, most likely in 1928.[88] Purchased by the WP&YR in 1947 as #X12. Work car from 1947 to 1966. Converted back to a full-length passenger car and renumbered to 268 in 1966.
270 Lake Kathleen (since 1967) J. Hammond Car Co. 1893 Originally, Pacific Coast Ry. Baggage Car #201.[20] Purchased by WP&YR as Baggage Car 1st 207 in 1937. Cupola added in 1937. Cupola removed, converted to passenger car, and renumbered to 270 in 1967.
272 Lake Nisutlin (since 1967) WP&YR 1900 Originally, Baggage Car 1st 203. Cupola added in 1925. Cupola removed, converted to passenger car, and renumbered to 272 in 1967. Wrecked at White Pass in 2014. Scrapped in 2016
274 Lake Primrose Coast Steel Fabricators, Ltd. 1969 Purchased new. Sold in 2011. Resold to Georgetown Loop R.R. by 2014 (#274).
276 1st Lake Big Salmon Coast Steel Fabricators, Ltd. 1969 Purchased new. Sold in 2005. Resold to Edwards Railcar Co. in 2007.
278 1st Lake Fairweather Coast Steel Fabricators, Ltd. 1969 Purchased new. Sold in 2005. Resold to Georgetown Loop R.R. in 2007 (#228). Renamed Silver Queen by GL RR.
280 Lake Dease Coast Steel Fabricators, Ltd. 1969 Purchased new. Shipped out in 2012. Sold to the Colorado Railroad Museum in 2015.
282 1st Lake Klukshu Coast Steel Fabricators, Ltd. 1976 Purchased new. Sold in 2005. Resold to Georgetown Loop R.R. in 2007 (#282). Renamed Clear Creek by GL RR.
284 1st Lake Takhini Coast Steel Fabricators, Ltd. 1976 Purchased new. Sold in 2005. Resold to Georgetown Loop R.R. in 2007 (#284). Renamed Argentine by GL RR.
286 Lake Kusawa Coast Steel Fabricators, Ltd. 1976 Purchased new. Shipped out in 2012. Sold to the Colorado Railroad Museum in 2015.
288 1st Lake McClintock Coast Steel Fabricators, Ltd. 1976 Purchased new. Sold in 2005. Resold in 2007.
290 Yukon River WP&YR 1994 Built up from one of Flat Cars ##470-477.[58]
300 Skagway River Beartown Mechanical Design 1998 Purchased new.
302 Taiya River Beartown Mechanical Design 1998 Purchased new.
304 Copper River Beartown Mechanical Design 1998 Purchased new.
306 Stikine River Beartown Mechanical Design 1998 Purchased new.
308 Klondike River Beartown Mechanical Design 1998 Purchased new.
310 Mackenzie River Beartown Mechanical Design 1998 Purchased new.
312 Tatshenshini River Jeff Hamilton 2000 Purchased new.
314 Alsek River Jeff Hamilton 2000 Purchased new.
316 Liard River Jeff Hamilton 2000 Purchased new.
318 Taku River Jeff Hamilton 2000 Purchased new.
320 Pelly River Jeff Hamilton 2001 Purchased new.
322 Fortymile River Jeff Hamilton 2001 Purchased new.
324 Porcupine River Jeff Hamilton 2001 Purchased new.
326 Peel River Jeff Hamilton 2001 Purchased new.
328 Stewart River Jeff Hamilton 2001 Purchased new.
330 Peace River Jeff Hamilton 2001 Purchased new.
332 Lake Johns Jeff Hamilton, shop #HA200401 2004 Purchased new.
334 Thompson River Jeff Hamilton, shop #HA200402 2004 Purchased new.
336 Lake Drury Jeff Hamilton, shop #HA200403 2004 Purchased new.
338 Lake McQuesten Jeff Hamilton, shop #HA200404 2004 Purchased new.
340 Lake Finlayson Jeff Hamilton, shop #HA200405 2004 Purchased new.
342 Lake McNeil Jeff Hamilton, shop #HA200406 2004 Purchased new.
344 Lake Munroe Jeff Hamilton, shop #HA200407 2004 Purchased new.
346 Lake Pelly Jeff Hamilton, shop #HA200408 2004 Purchased new.
348 2nd Lake Klukshu Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #001 2005 Purchased new.
350 2nd Lake McClintock Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #002 2005 Purchased new.
352 2nd Lake Big Salmon Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #003 2005 Purchased new.
354 2nd Lake Takhini Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #004 2005 Purchased new.
356 2nd Lake Fairweather Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #005 2005 Purchased new.
358 Lake Hutshi Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #006 2005 Purchased new.
360 Lake Annie Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #007 2005 Purchased new.
362 Lake Crag Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #008 2005 Purchased new.
364 Lake Frances Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #009 2005 Purchased new.
366 Lake Choutla Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #010 2005 Purchased new.
368 Lake Wasson Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #2007-1 2007 Purchased new.
370 Lake Surprise Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #2007-_ 2007 Purchased new.
372 Lake McConnell Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #2007-_ 2007 Purchased new.
374 Lake Jennings Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #2007-_ 2007 Purchased new.
376 Lake Squanga Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #2007-_ 2007 Purchased new.
378 Whiting River Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1205-12-378 2012 Hamilton Model ADA-12-15. Purchased new. Equipped with wheelchair lift.
380 Aishihik River Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1205-12-382 2012 Hamilton Model PASS-12-15. Purchased new.
382 Nakina River Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1205-12-380 2012 Hamilton Model PASS-12-15. Purchased new.
384 Lake Racine Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1310384 2014 Hamilton Model ADA-14. Purchased new. Equipped with wheelchair lift.
386 Lake Goat Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1310386 2014 Hamilton Model STD-26. Purchased new.
388 Lake Beaver Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1310388 2014 Hamilton Model STD-26. Purchased new.
390 Lake Fox Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1360-100-1 2015 Hamilton Model COMP-100. Purchased new.
400 Michael J. Heney Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1320400 2014 Hamilton Model "Club." Purchased new. Club car.
402 Samuel H. Graves Hamilton Mfg. Co., shop #1320402 2014 Hamilton Model "Club." Purchased new. Club car.
___ ______ ______ 201_ Club car on order in 2018.
___ ______ ______ 201_ Club car on order in 2018.
___ ______ ______ 201_ Club car on order in 2018.
___ ______ ______ 201_ Club car on order in 2018.
932 ........ ........ ........ See, #X3.
USA 932 ........ ........ ........ See, #X3.
USA 933 ........ ........ ........ See, #267.
USA 934 ........ ........ ........ See, #211.

[47][48][49][52][89][90]

Existing White Pass freight train cars[edit]

cars with light grey have been either put on display, or sold to other railroads.

Number(s) Type Builder Year(s) Built Remarks
Rotary #1 Rotary Snowplow Cooke Locomotive & Machine Works, shop #56 1899 Purchased new. Retired in 1962. Restored to service in 1995.

Received a 190-class tender in 1944.[42] Then in 1947, received tender from Loco #80. Then in 1950, received tender from Loco #70. Then in 1953, exchanged tenders with Loco #190.[8][35] Original Rotary #1 tender assigned to Rotary #3 from 1947 to 1951, and placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1951.[13]

Rotary #2 Rotary Snowplow Cooke Locomotive & Machine Works, shop #61 1900 Purchased new. Retired in 1963. Sold to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1977. Put on display at Breckenridge, Colorado in 1989 as Denver, Leadville & Gunnison Ry. #01 (fantasy designation).

Original tender used to make Flatcar #102 in 1942. Received tender from Loco #57 in 1942. Then in 1944, received a 190-class tender.[42] Then in 1947, received tender from Loco 1st 81. Then in 1951, received a hybrid tender, consisting of underframe from Loco #69’s original tender and superstructure from Loco #71’s original tender. Then in 1953, exchanged tenders with Loco #192.[8][35] Ex-#192 tender sold to SV RR in 1977, then returned to WP&YR in 1990 as a spare for Loco #73. Tender originally from Chicago, Burlington & Quincy R.R. standard gauge 4-6-2 Loco #2901 (Baldwin 1910) put on display with this rotary in 1989.

1 to 6

(6 cars)

Flatcars WP&YR 1900 Capacity = 1.05 tons. Single 4-wheel truck. No air brake. Used on the Taku Tram. Retired in 1951.

No. 1 was a passenger car from 1900 to 1937. #4 put on display at Skagway, Alaska in 1971. 4 cars are at Taku, British Columbia. 1 car is at Scotia Bay, British Columbia.

8 Tank Car Unknown[91] 1906 Capacity = 6,630 US gal (25,100 l; 5,520 imp gal). Arch bar trucks. Originally, Union Tank Car Co. (UTLX) #10844, a standard gauge UTLX Class V (frameless) tank car.[92] Purchased by WP&YR and converted to 3-foot gauge in 1939. Donated to the BC Forest Discovery Centre, Duncan, British Columbia, in 1978.
X9 Flatcar Colorado & Southern Ry. 1909[93] Capacity = 25 short tons (23 t). Originally, C&S boxcar. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943.[94] Converted to flatcar by Chicago Freight Car Parts Co. in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #334085).[95] Built up into gondola in 1944. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947 (Gondola #773). Renumbered #123 in 1950. Cut back down to flatcar in 1952. Became Work Car 4th #X9 (4th boom car) in 1958. Sold to Marcus Rail LLC in 1987. Rebuilt into C&S Boxcar 2nd#8311 by the Uhrich Locomotive Works in 1996. (8311 [built 1910][93] cannot have been its original C&S number.) Sold to the City of Breckenridge, Colorado in 1998. Sold to the U.S. Forest Service and moved to Boreas Pass, Colorado in 2002.
10 Tank Car Tank: unknown;[91]

underframe: Pullman Co.[96]

Tank: 1908;

underframe: 1942[96]

Capacity ≈ 6,500 US gal (25,000 l; 5,400 imp gal). Originally, a standard gauge Union Tank Car Co. (UTLX) Class V (frameless) tank car.[92] Purchased by WP&YR and converted 3-foot gauge in 1941. Mounted on underframe of Gondola #110 in 1949.[96] Stored since 2002.
27 Tank Car Tank: American Car & Foundry Co.;[97]

replacement underframe: American Car & Foundry Co.[98]

Tank: 1918;[99]

replacement underframe: 1908[98]

Capacity = 6,672 US gal (25,260 l; 5,556 imp gal). Original order had been for 575 standard gauge 6,500 US gal (25,000 l; 5,400 imp gal) tank cars to be used in France.[97] Due to the progress of World War I, 500 standard gauge 7,089 US gal (26,830 l; 5,903 imp gal) tank cars were delivered instead and used by the U.S. Army Ordnance Dept. (GPRX #4001~4500).[100] Reassigned in 1920 to U.S. Army Quartermaster Corps (USQX #7034~7520).[101] Under Army ownership, car wrecked and repaired, the repair reducing its capacity to 6,672 gallons. Tank mounted on WP&YR Flatcar #319 in 1944 (USA 27).[102] Tank turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#27). Re-mounted on the underframe of Gondola #108 in 1952. Re-mounted on the former underframe of Tank Car #3 (formerly, Flatcar #541) in 1956. Re-mounted on Flatcar #316 in 1968.[98] Stored since 2002.
28 Tank Car Tank: unknown;[91]

replacement underframe: Pullman Co.[103]

Tank: 1912;

replacement underframe: 1942[103]

Capacity = 6,671 US gal (25,250 l; 5,555 imp gal). Originally, UTLX #15744, a standard gauge Union Tank Car Co. (UTLX) Class V (frameless) tank car.[92] Purchased by WP&YR and mounted Flatcar #325 in 1949.[104] Re-mounted on the underframe of Gondola #116 in 1950.[103] Put on display at the Yukon Transportation Museum in 1990, posing as #42 (fantasy number).
Fantasy 42 Tank Car ........ ........ See, #28.
50, 51, and 58 to 65

(10 cars)

Tank Cars Tanks: American Car & Foundry Co. (##60, 61, 63); Pressed Steel Car Co. (#64); Standard Oil Co. (Atlas Works, ##58, 65); Standard Steel Car Co. (##50, 51, 59, 62)[105]

underframes: Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R.[106]

Tanks: 1907 (#58); 1908 (##50 and ##59-65); 1915 (#51);

underframes: 1924, 1927, and 1930.[107]

Originally, standard gauge Union Tank Car Co. (UTLX) Class X (center sill) tank cars.[105] Center sills replaced by small underframes and converted to 3-foot gauge in 1924, 1927, and 1930.[107] Upon conversion, they ran on the D&RGW. Purchased by WP&YR in 1963. #50 = UTLX #13084 (6,533 US gal (24,730 l; 5,440 imp gal)); #51 = UTLX #12739 (6,583 US gal (24,920 l; 5,481 imp gal)); #58 = UTLX #12770 (6,561 US gal (24,840 l; 5,463 imp gal)); #59 = UTLX #12976 (6,535 US gal (24,740 l; 5,442 imp gal)); #60 = UTLX #13236 (6,488 US gal (24,560 l; 5,402 imp gal)); #61 = UTLX #13172 (6,482 US gal (24,540 l; 5,397 imp gal)); #62 = UTLX #12962 (6,646 US gal (25,160 l; 5,534 imp gal)); #63 = UTLX #13168 (6,495 US gal (24,590 l; 5,408 imp gal)); #64 = UTLX #12918 (6,651 US gal (25,180 l; 5,538 imp gal)); #65 = UTLX #12757 (6,567 US gal (24,860 l; 5,468 imp gal)).[108][109]

No. 58 to Colorado R.R. Museum in 1991. ##50, 51, 62, 63, 64, and 65 to Cumbres & Toltec Scenic R.R. in 1991. #59 to Georgetown Loop R.R. in 1991. #61 to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1991 (SV 2nd 100). #60 to SV RR in 2005.

53 Tank Car Tank: Pressed Steel Car Co.;[105]

replacement underframe: Pullman Co.[110]

Tank: 1908;

replacement underframe: 1942[110]

Capacity = 6,533 US gal (24,730 l; 5,440 imp gal). Originally, Union Tank Car Co. (UTLX) #12838, a standard gauge UTLX Class X (center sill) tank car.[105] Center sill replaced by small underframe and converted to 3-foot gauge in 1927. Upon conversion, it ran on the Denver & Rio Grande Western R.R. Type E internal steam heating pipes installed between 1919 & 1929.[111] Renumbered to UTLX 88107 in 1947. Renumbered to UTLX 11019 in 1956. Purchased by WP&YR in 1963. Tank re-mounted on Flatcar #106[110] in 1980. Water car.
One of ##65-69 Chassis of Center-Pivot, Side-Lift Dump Car Western Wheeled Scraper Co. 1890’s Capacity of bin had been 4 cubic yards. Single 4-wheel truck. No air brake. Originally owned by W. D. Hofius & Co. Sold to WP&YR in 1899 for use during construction of railroad.[112] Chassis reported in 2018 to be at Alaska 360 Dredge Town, adjacent Klondike Highway Mile 2.2, Skagway, Alaska.
479 to 482, and 484 to 491

(12 cars)

Container Flatcars National Steel Car Corp.[113] 1969 Capacity = 50 short tons (45 t). Purchased new.

No. 479 had deck and retaining railings added in the 1990s for use in open-air baggage service. ##486, 487, and 489 were configured to accept baggage containers in 2009.

640 Multi-Service Car[114]

(Ballast Car)

Canadian Car & Foundry Co., Lot #2247, Specification #F-76 1958 Capacity = 55 cu yd (42 m3). Originally, 42-inch gauge, Canadian National Rys. (Newfoundland) #6794.[115] Purchased by the WP&YR and converted to 3-foot gauge in 1990.
641 to 647

(7 cars)

Multi-Service Cars[114]

(Ballast Cars)

Canadian Car & Foundry Co., Lot #2269, Specification #F-80 1959 Capacity = 55 cu yd (42 m3). Originally, 42-inch gauge, Canadian National Rys. (Newfoundland). Purchased by the WP&YR and converted to 3-foot gauge in 1990.

No. 641 = CN #6774; #642 = CN #6765; #643 = CN #6786; #644 = CN #6758; #645 = CN #6768; #646 = CN #6772, #647 = CN #6784.[115]

650 to 657

(7 cars)

Side-Pivot, Drop-Side, Air-Dump Cars[116] Eastern Car Co. 1958 Capacity = 16 cu yd (12 m3). Originally, 42-inch gauge, Canadian National Rys. (Newfoundland). Purchased by WP&YR and converted to 3-foot gauge in 1989.

No. 650 = CN #15016; #651 = CN #15015; #652 = CN #15010; #653 = CN #15006; #654 = CN #15011; #655 = CN #15005; #656 = CN #15004; #657 = CN #15013.

661 Ralson-Type Drop-Bottom Dump Car Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1940 Capacity = 22 cu yd (17 m3). Arch bar trucks. Purchased new. Originally #801. Renumbered to 861 in 1947. Renumbered to 661 in 1960. Sold to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1985 (SV #661).
662 Ralson-Type Drop-Bottom Dump Car Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1940 Capacity = 22 cu yd (17 m3). Arch bar trucks. Purchased new. Originally #802. Renumbered to 862 in 1947. Renumbered to 662 in 1960. Sold to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1991 (SV #86).
663 Ralson-Type Drop-Bottom Dump Car Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1940 Capacity = 22 cu yd (17 m3). Arch bar trucks. Purchased new. Originally #803. Renumbered to 863 in 1947. Renumbered to 663 in 1960. Sold to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1991 (SV #663). Resold back to WP&YR in 2005. Put on display at 8th Ave. and Spring St., Skagway, Alaska in 2016.
664 Ralson-Type Drop-Bottom Dump Car Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1940 Capacity = 22 cu yd (17 m3). Arch bar trucks. Purchased new. Originally #804. Renumbered to 864 in 1947. Renumbered to 664 in 1960. Sold to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1991 (SV #664).
665 Ralson-Type Drop-Bottom Dump Car Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1940 Capacity = 22 cu yd (17 m3). Arch bar trucks. Purchased new. Originally #805. Renumbered to 865 in 1947. Renumbered to 665 in 1960. Put on display adjacent to Skagway Museum in 1991.
672, 674, 679, 680, 682, and 683

(6 cars)

3-Bay Hopper Cars East Broad Top R.R. & Coal Co. 1919 (##672, 674, 679, 680); 1927 (#682); 1917 (#683) Capacity = 50 cu yd (38 m3) of coal or 38 cu yd (29 m3) of gravel (40 short tons (36 t)). Originally, EBT. Purchased by WP&YR in 1968. No. 672 = EBT #1029; #674 = EBT #1038; #679 = EBT #1047; #680 = EBT #1024; #682 = EBT #1072; #683 = EBT #960.[117]

To Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1991.

676 3-Bay Hopper Car East Broad Top R.R. & Coal Co. 1919 Capacity = 50 cu yd (38 m3) of coal or 38 cu yd (29 m3) of gravel (40 short tons (36 t)). Originally, EBT #1028.[117] Purchased by WP&YR in 1968. To Lahaina, Kaanapali & Pacific R.R. in 1995.
678 3-Bay Hopper Car East Broad Top R.R. & Coal Co. 1914 Capacity = 50 cu yd (38 m3) of coal or 38 cu yd (29 m3) of gravel (40 short tons (36 t)). Originally, EBT #858.[117] Purchased by WP&YR in 1968. Stored since 2002.
708 Boxcar Colorado & Southern Ry. 1910[93] Capacity = 25 short tons (23 t). Originally, C&S #8336.[118] Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232914).[94] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#708). Wash & shower work car from 1960 until 1973. Tool car from 1973 to 1982. In baggage service in 1982. Back to tool car service beginning in 1988. Retired in 2009.
737 Flatcar Colorado & Southern Ry. 1910[93] Capacity = 25 short tons (23 t). Originally, C&S boxcar. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943.[94] Converted to flatcar by Chicago Freight Car Parts Co. in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #334073).[95] Sold to the WP&YR in 1947 (#737). Retired in 2017.
742 Boxcar Colorado & Southern Ry. 1910[93] Capacity = 25 short tons (23 t). Originally, C&S #8313.[118] Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232943).[94] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#742). Retired in 1977. Reactivated in 1982. In baggage service from 1982 to 2008. To work car service beginning in 2009. Retired by 2016.
783 Flatcar Colorado & Southern Ry. 1910[93] Capacity = 25 short tons (23 t). Originally, C&S boxcar. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943.[94] Converted to flatcar by Chicago Freight Car Parts Co. in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #334117).[95] Sold to the WP&YR in 1947 (#783). Sold to Marcus Rail LLC in 1987. Rebuilt back into C&S Boxcar #8323 by the Uhrich Locomotive Works in 1996. (Unknown whether 8323 was its original C&S number.) Sold to the City of Breckenridge, Colorado in 1998.
3rd 901 Extended Vision Caboose WP&YR 1972 ........
2nd 903 Extended Vision Caboose WP&YR 1969 Sold to Midwest Central R.R. in 1991.
2nd 905 Extended Vision Caboose WP&YR 1968 Became U.S. Forest Service shelter at Denver, Alaska in 1994.
909 Cupola Caboose with Flanger Colorado & Southern Ry. 1910[93] Originally, C&S boxcar. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943.[119] Converted to caboose-flanger by Chicago Freight Car Parts Co. in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #90857).[120] Renumbered to 857 in 1944. Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#909). Retired in 1968. Restored to service in 1998.
1st 911 Cupola Caboose Sumpter Valley Ry.[121] 1904[122] Originally, SV Ry. #3. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 (USA #911). Retired in 1946. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947 (1st 911). Resold in 1947 to a private party who used it as a shed in Skagway, Alaska. Sent to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1991 (SV #3). Restored to operation on SV RR in 2006.
2nd 911 Cupola Caboose Colorado & Southern Ry. 1910[93] Originally, C&S boxcar. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943.[119] Converted to caboose by Chicago Freight Car Parts Co. in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #90861).[120] Renumbered to 861 in 1944. Sold to the WP&YR in 1947 (#861). Converted to Work Car #X14 in 1955. Named Katler’s Castle, 1962~1965[8] (for Karl Kattler [ fl. 1953, d. 1974~1978], WP&YR section foreman). Re-converted back to caboose and renumbered to 2nd 911 in 1967. Retired in 1972. Put on display at 8th Ave. and Spring St., Skagway, Alaska in 2016.
1000 Flatcar WP&YR 1954 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Arch bar trucks.[123] Made from unused passenger car underframe. Put on display at the Yukon Transportation Museum in 1995.
1001 Flatcar WP&YR 1954 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Arch bar trucks.[123] Made from unused passenger car underframe. Put on display behind Loco #195, adjacent to Skagway Museum in 1998.
1002 Flatcar WP&YR 1954 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Made from unused passenger car underframe.
1003 Flatcar unknown[124] most likely, 1944[124] Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Originally, U.S. Navy (Hawaii). Trucks built for Navy in 1942 by American Steel Foundries.[125] Car purchased by WP&YR in 1954.
1004 Flatcar unknown[124] most likely, 1944[124] Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Originally, U.S. Navy (Hawaii). Trucks built for Navy in 1942 by American Steel Foundries.[125] Car purchased by WP&YR in 1954.
1005 to 1007, and 1009

(4 cars)

Flatcars Pressed Steel Car Co.[124] 1945[124] Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Originally, U.S. Navy (Hawaii). Trucks built for Navy in 1942 by American Steel Foundries.[125] Car purchased by WP&YR in 1954.
1010 to 1013

(4 cars)

Flatcars Pressed Steel Car Co.[124] 1945[124] Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Originally, U.S. Navy (Hawaii). Trucks built for Navy in 1942 by American Steel Foundries.[125] Car purchased by WP&YR in 1956.
1016 Flatcar WP&YR 1943, 1956 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Made in 1956 from Flatcar #R2 (WP&YR, 1943).
1020 Flatcar Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1957 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Purchased new.
1021 Flatcar Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1957 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Purchased new.
1025 Flatcar Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1961 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Purchased new.
1026 Flatcar Pacific Car & Foundry Co. 1961 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Purchased new.
1102, 1103, 1105, 1107 to 1110, 1114, 1116, 1118, and 1120

(11 cars)

Flatcars Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcars intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army and transferred to Oahu Ry. & Land Co. in 1942.[127] Purchased by WP&YR via Lou-Ann Trading Co. (dealer) and cut down to flatcars in 1954.

No. 1105 was configured with railings in 2014 to act as a medical rescue car.

1127 Flatcar Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcar intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army (USA #23150).[127] Cut down to underframe for Tank Car #29 in 1943. Converted to flatcar in 1957 (#1127).
1128 Flatcar Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcar intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army (USA #23135).[127] Cut down to work car in 1944. Transferred to WP&YR in 1946 (#23135). Renumbered to #1st X9 in 1947. Became underframe of Tank Car #11 in 1952. Converted to flatcar in 1959 (#1128). Put on display behind Loco #195, adjacent to Skagway Museum in 1998.
1129 Flatcar Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcar intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army (USA #23135).[127] Cut down to work car in 1944. Transferred to WP&YR in 1946 (#23130). Became underframe of Tank Car #25 in 1943. Converted to flatcar in 1950 (#1129).
1131, 1145, 1146, 1147, 1150, 1153, 1156, 1157, 1161, 1163, 1166, 1170, 1172, and 1173

(14 cars)

Flatcars Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcars intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army and transferred to U.S. Navy in 1942.[127] Sold to Oahu Ry. in 1959. Cut down to flatcars and sold to WP&YR in 1962.

Nos. 1131, 1156, 1157, 1163, and 1170 to Midwest Central R.R. in 1996;[128] ##1157 and 1163 resold to Georgetown Loop R.R. in 2011. #1172 to GL RR in 2005. ##1146 and 1150 to Kauai Plantation in 2005. ##1145, 1147, 1161, and 1166 to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 2005. ##1153 and 1173 to GL RR in 2007.

1132 to 1138, 1140, 1142, 1144, and 1168

(11 cars)

Flatcars Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcars intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army and transferred to U.S. Navy in 1942.[127] Sold to Oahu Ry. in 1959. Cut down to flatcars and sold to WP&YR in 1962.
1165 Flatcar Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcar intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army and transferred to U.S. Navy in 1942.[127] Sold to Oahu Ry. in 1959. Cut down to flatcar and sold to WP&YR in 1962.
1174 Flatcar Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcar intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army and transferred to U.S. Navy in 1942.[127] Sold to Oahu Ry. in 1959. Cut down to flatcar and sold to WP&YR in 1962.
1179, 1181, 1184, 1185, and 1190

(5 cars)

Flatcars Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcars intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army and transferred to U.S. Navy in 1942.[127] Sold to Kahului R.R. and cut down to flatcars in 1961. Sold to WP&YR via Midwest Steel Corp. (dealer) in 1967.

No. 1185 to Sumpter Valley R.R. in 1993. #1181 to Midwest Central R.R. in 1996.[128] ##1179, 1184, and 1190 to Kauai Plantation in 2005.

1180, 1183, and 1193

(3 cars)

Flatcars Pullman Co., Lot #5706-A.[126] 1942 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Built as boxcars intended for the Ferrocarril del Estado (Argentine State Railway), but sold to U.S. Army and transferred to U.S. Navy in 1942.[127] Sold to Kahului R.R. and cut down to flatcars in 1961. Sold to WP&YR via Midwest Steel Corp. (dealer) in 1967.
1200 Depressed Center Flatcar Baldwin Locomotive Works and WP&YR 1900 (Baldwin), 1957 (WP&YR) Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Originally, underframe for Loco #62 tender (Baldwin shop #17895). Tender reassigned to Loco #66 in 1947. Tender superstructure replaced in 1951. Underframe used to make Depressed Center Flatcar #1200 in 1957.
1201 Depressed Center Flatcar Baldwin Locomotive Works and WP&YR 1938 (Baldwin), 1962 (WP&YR) Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t). Originally, underframe for Loco #70 tender (Baldwin shop #62234). Tender assigned to Rotary #1 from 1950 to 1953. Assigned to Loco #190 from 1953 to 1960.[8] Used to make Depressed Center Flatcar #1201 in 1962.
1202 Depressed Center Flatcar WP&YR 1967 Capacity = 30 short tons (27 t).
1203 Depressed Center Flatcar WP&YR 1968 Capacity = 40 short tons (36 t).

[129]

Existing White Pass track motor cars[edit]

cars with light grey have been either put on display, or sold to other railroads.

Number(s) or Name Type Builder Year Built Remarks
Claws #1 Right Rail Spike Puller Nordco, Inc., shop #403 1992 Self-propelled, Diesel-hydraulic. Nordco Claws Model LS. 31 H.P. Deutz AG F2L1011 engine. Originally owned by Kansas City Southern Ry. Purchased in 2004 via North American Equipment Sales Co. (dealer). Converted to 3-foot gauge by N.A. Equip. Sales.[130]
Claws #2 Left Rail Spike Puller Rexnord, Inc. (Nordco, Inc. since 1987), shop #129 1984 Self-propelled, Diesel-hydraulic. Rexnord/Nordberg Claws Model LS. Originally owned by Atlas Railroad Construction, LLC. Purchased in 2004 via North American Equipment Sales Co. (dealer). Converted to 3-foot gauge by N.A. Equip. Sales.[130]
Hi-Rail #1 Road-Rail Vehicle Ford Motor Co., VIN 1FT7W2B69DEB52216

Hamilton Mfg. Co.

2016 Made from Made from 2013 Ford Super Duty F-250 SRW pickup truck. 385 hp (287 kW) V-8 gasoline engine.
Hi-Rail #2 Road-Rail Vehicle Ford Motor Co., VIN 1FTSX21Y36EA48172

Hamilton Mfg. Co.

2016 Made from Made from 2006 Ford Super Duty F-250 SRW pickup truck. 385 hp (287 kW) V-8 gasoline engine.
Hydra-Spiker Spiker Rexnord, Inc. (Nordco, Inc. since 1987), shop #151 1984 Self-propelled, Diesel-hydraulic. Rexnord/Nordberg Hydra-Spiker Model B. Purchased in 2004 via North American Equipment Sales Co. (dealer). Previous owner unknown. Converted to 3-foot gauge by N.A. Equip. Sales.[130]
Tie & Bridge Crane Tie & Bridge Crane Kershaw Mfg. Co. Self-propelled, Diesel-hydraulic. Deere & Co. engine. Originally, Alaska Railroad. Purchased in 2018 via Hamilton Mfg. Co. (dealer). Converted to 3-foot gauge by Hamilton.
Tie Master #1 Tie Exchanger RCC Materials & Equipment Corp., shop #B9302012AWP 1994 Self-propelled, but usually transported on push car to and from work sites. 18 hp (13 kW) Briggs & Stratton Corp. Vanguard V-8 gasoline engine. Purchased new.
Tie Master #2 Tie Exchanger RCC Materials & Equipment Corp. 1994 Self-propelled, but usually transported on push car to and from work sites. 18 hp (13 kW) Briggs & Stratton Corp. Vanguard V-8 gasoline engine. Purchased new.
Tie Master #3 Tie Exchanger RCC Materials & Equipment Corp., shop #B9907058AWP 1999 Self-propelled, but usually transported on push car to and from work sites. 18 hp (13 kW) Briggs & Stratton Corp. Vanguard V-8 gasoline engine. Purchased new.
26-3 Ballast Regulator Kershaw Mfg. Co., shop #C26-108 1989 Self-propelled. Kershaw Model 26-3-1. 185 hp (138 kW) General Motors Corp. 3-53 Diesel engine. Purchased new.
950 Tie Crane Pandrol Jackson, Inc., shop #151893 1995 Self-propelled, Diesel-hydraulic. Pandrol Jackson Model 950. 71 hp (53 kW) Deere & Co. 4039D engine. Crane engine = 76 hp (57 kW) Cummins Engine Co. 4BT Diesel. Purchased new.
2001 Inspection Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., shop #231549 or 231550 1968 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model M15-B1 (Z36). Has 8 hp (6.0 kW) Fairmont RO6-P engine. Purchased new. No cab. Sold by 1996.
2003 Inspection Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., shop #231551 1968 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model M15-B1 (Z36). Has 8 hp (6.0 kW) Fairmont RO6-P engine. Purchased new. No cab. Put on display in the Skagway Airport between 2001 & 2012.
most likely, 2004 Inspection Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Ltd. (Canada) about 1966 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model M19-H (Z36). Built in Canada. Has Fairmont RO-C engine. Transferred to Sumpter Valley R.R. between 1991 & 1993 (SV M-31).
2009 Gang Trailer WP&YR between 1969 & 1976 Push car with fully enclosed cab. Has manual brake. Cab formerly on Gang Car #2013 may have been installed between 1982 & 1990. Extensively, if not entirely, rebuilt between 2003 & 2007.
2010 Gang Car Chassis: Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc. shop #222770, 227447, 228867, or 230526;

cab: WP&YR

1961, 1965, 1966, or 1967 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A5-E (Z36). Original and replacement engines both 35 hp (26 kW) Waukesha Motor Co. Model FC. Retired in 1977. Put on display at Yukon Transportation Museum between 1990 & 2001.

[#222770=1961, #227447=1965, #228867=1966, #230526=1967.]

2018 Gang Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., most likely, shop #237978, 237993, or 237994[131][132][133][134] 1973 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F3-3 (Z36). Has 103 hp (77 kW) Ford Motor Co. 240 engine. Purchased new. Cab roof and ends applied at factory. Cab sides by WP&YR.
2019 Gang Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., most likely, shop #237978, 237993, or 237994[131][132][133][134] 1973 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F3-3 (Z36). Has 103 hp (77 kW) Ford Motor Co. 240 engine. Purchased new. Cab roof and ends applied at factory. Cab sides by WP&YR. Engine failed in 2015. Stored.
2020 Gang Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., most likely, shop #237978, 237993, or 237994[131][132][133][134] 1973 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F3-3 (Z36). Has 103 hp (77 kW) Ford Motor Co. 240 engine. Purchased new. Cab roof and ends applied at factory. Cab sides by WP&YR.
2021 Gang Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., most likely, shop #241349 or 241350[131][132][133][134] 1976 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F4-1 (Z36). Has 122 hp (91 kW) Ford Motor Co. 300 engine. Purchased new. Cab roof and ends applied at factory. Cab sides by WP&YR.
2022 Gang Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., most likely, shop #241349 or 241350[131][132][133][134] 1976 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F4-1 (Z36). Has 122 hp (91 kW) Ford Motor Co. 300 engine. Purchased new. Cab roof and ends applied at factory. Cab sides by WP&YR.
2024 Gang Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., most likely, shop #242262 or 242263[131][132][133][134] 1976 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F4-1 (Z36). Has 122 hp (91 kW) Ford Motor Co. 300 engine. Purchased new. Cab roof and ends applied at factory. Cab sides by WP&YR.
2026 Gang Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., most likely, shop #243932 or 243933[131][132][133][134] 1977 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F4-1 (Z36). Has 122 hp (91 kW) Ford Motor Co. 300 engine. Purchased new. Cab roof and ends applied at factory. Cab sides by WP&YR. Stored.
2044 Gang Car Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., most likely, shop #244678[131][132][133][134] 1978 Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F4-1 (Z36). 122 hp (91 kW) Ford Motor Co. 300 engine. Purchased new. Cab roof and ends applied at factory. Cab sides by WP&YR. Road No. 2044 applied in 1979.
2046 or 2150 Box Trailer Chassis: Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc.;

superstructure: Haulmark

2015 Haulmark 5' Wide Transport Cargo container mounted on Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc. TT14 (Z36) push car (ex-#2046 or 2150). Running gear equipped for manual brake, but no human interface to actuate brake.
2055 Inspection Car Chassis: Patrick W. "Smitty" Smith;

superstructure: WP&YR

chassis: late 1990’s;

superstructure: 2005

Gasoline-mechanical. Has 14 hp (10 kW) Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc. RK-B engine (1955~1979, ex-Arizona & California R.R.). Chassis and engine once on a standard gauge inspection car built in the late 1990s by "Smitty" Smith for his own use. Converted to narrow gauge after 1999. Sold to WP&YR and new cab installed in 2005. Never used by WP&YR. Put on display in Carcross depot in 2009.
2067 Ballast Tamper Canron, Inc., shop #4370977 1975 Self-propelled, Diesel-mechanical. Canron Model VPSJW. Has 97 hp (72 kW) General Motors Corp. 3-53 engine. Purchased new.
2154 Track Liner Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., shop #240128 1975 Self-propelled, Diesel-hydraulic. Fairmont Model W111-B2 (Z36). Has 97 hp (72 kW) General Motors Corp. 3-53 engine. Purchased new. Sometimes called a "spud" liner.[135]
2400 Ballast Tamper Pandrol Jackson, Inc., shop #151967 1995 Self-propelled, Diesel-hydraulic. Pandrol Jackson Model 2400. Has 100 hp (75 kW) Cummins Inc. 4BT engine. Purchased new.

[136][137]

Existing White Pass car bodies detached from trucks[edit]

Car bodies with light grey have been either put on display or sold.

Number Unit Last Reported Location Builder

Year Built

Remarks
2nd 1

(B end)

Tank Car Tank Utah, Yukon, former WP&YR Mile Post 105.5, access road at Alaska Highway Kilometer 1415.7, Whitehorse, Yukon (2018) American Car & Foundry Co. Lot #7514,[138] tank #3961

1915[138]

Capacity = 2,275 US gal (8,610 l; 1,894 imp gal). Originally, one the three tanks on a Union Tank Car Co. ##13450-13549 series (6,100 US gal (23,000 l; 5,100 imp gal)) tank car.[138] Tank purchased by WP&YR and mounted with a similar second tank on the former underframe of Tank Car 1st 1 in 1931. This underframe originally had been the underframe of Stock Car #765 (1906). The new 1931 car was 2nd 1. In 1959, tanks were remounted on former Flatcar #643 (1906), with Tank #3961 at B end. Tanks detached from car in 1965.

Subsequently, Tank #3961 served as a gasoline fuel tank at Fraser, British Columbia. Between 1986 & 1990, tank taken out of service and relocated to Utah transfer site.

X4 Bunk Car, without Trucks 8th Ave. and Spring St., Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1906

Originally, WP&YR Boxcar #690. Ore unloading door installed at the bottom of the “A” end of the car in 1910. Car converted to bunk car in 1942 (#690). Renumbered to B04, then to X4 in 1947.

Trucks detached in 1965.

USA 14 Tank Car Tank Near confluence of Lombard Pup[139] and Dominion Creek, Yukon. From Hunker Creek Road Kilometer 26, go south on Dominion Creek Road about 2 kilometers, then west on side road about ½ kilometer (2015) East Tennessee & Western North Carolina R.R.

1925

Originally, tank for ET&WNC Tank Car #ETX603. Car purchased by U.S. Army in 1942 for use on the WP&YR. Car unserviceable in 1947.

Tank became British Yukon Navigation Co. storage tank in 1952.

17 Tank Car Tank Utah, Yukon, former WP&YR Mile Post 105.5, access road at Alaska Highway Kilometer 1415.7, Whitehorse, Yukon (2018) William Graver Tank Works

1902

Capacity = 6,500 US gal (25,000 l; 5,400 imp gal). Tank originally on a standard gauge tank car owned by the Southern Pacific Co. Tank sold to the Nevada County Narrow Gauge R.R. and mounted on a narrow gauge flatcar in 1934 (#183). Purchased by WP&YR via Dulien Steel Products Co. (dealer) in 1943.

Tank became British Yukon Navigation Co. Storage Tank #T.8 at Whitehorse, Yukon in 1952. There is a weld line on the dome, indicating that it has been cut down significantly.

56 Slope-Back Tender Superstructure ........ ........ See, #61.
60[22] Tender Superstructure Adjacent to Museum, Skagway, Alaska (2018) Baldwin Locomotive Works #17750

1900

Loco #60 and tender placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1949.[13] Both retrieved in 1990. Tender superstructure moved adjacent Skagway Museum about 2000.
61 Slope-Back Tender Superstructure Adjacent to Museum, Skagway, Alaska (2018) White Pass

1936

Either built or rebuilt in 1936 for use with Loco #56.[140] Loco #56 scrapped and its tender placed behind Loco #61 in 1938.[21] Loco #61 and replacement tender superstructure placed as riprap along the Skagway River in 1949.[13] Both retrieved in 1990. Tender superstructure moved adjacent Skagway Museum about 2000.
406[141] Refrigerator Car Superstructure Klondike Highway Mile 2.9 (north car), Skagway, Alaska (2018) Colorado & Southern Ry.

1910[93]

Originally, C&S Boxcar C&S #8359. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR.[94] Converted to refrigerator car by Chicago Freight Car Parts Co. in 1943 (USA #232895).[142] Transferred to the WP&YR in 1946.

Underframe detached in 1960. Body to local resident. From 1979 to 2006, body rested on substitute underframe as part of Broadway Station™ restaurant.

440 Refrigerator Car, without Trucks 1st Ave., between State St. and Main St., Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1906

Originally, Boxcar #686. Converted to refrigerator car in 1943 (#686). Renumbered to 440 in 1946.

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.

506 Boxcar, without Trucks 19th Ave. and Coach Yard Alley (north car), Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1899

Ore unloading door installed at the bottom of the “A” end of the car in 1910.

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.

530[143][144][145] Boxcar, without Trucks Klondike Highway Mile 2.9 (south car), Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1899[145]

Original arch bar trucks detached in 1958.[143] Body to local resident. From 1979 to 2006, body rested on Bettendorf trucks as part of Broadway Station™ restaurant.
570 Boxcar, without Trucks 21½ Alley, between State St. and Main St., Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1899

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.
590[143][144][146] Boxcar, without Trucks 17½ Alley, between State St. and Main St., Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1900

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.
626 Boxcar, without Trucks 9½ Alley, between Main St. and Alaska St. (south side, just off Alaska), Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1900

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.
656 Boxcar, without Trucks 8th Ave. and Spring St., Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1900

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.
670 Boxcar, without Trucks 19th Ave. and Coach Yard Alley (south car), Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1900

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.
682 Boxcar, without Trucks 9½ Alley, between Main St. and Alaska St. (north side, just off Main), Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1900

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.
688[143][144][147] Boxcar, without Trucks Portage Lake, British Columbia, WP&YR Mile Post 30.5, access road at Klondike Highway Kilometer 41.1 (2018) WP&YR

1906[147]

Retired in 1958.[143] Body to local resident.
702 Boxcar, without Trucks 19½ Alley, between State St. and Main St., Skagway, Alaska (2018) Colorado & Southern Ry.

1909[93]

Originally, C&S Boxcar #8215.[118] Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232907).[94] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#702).

Trucks detached in 1978. Body to local resident.

704 Boxcar, without Trucks Meadows, British Columbia, WP&YR Mile Post 25.4 (2014) Colorado & Southern Ry.

1909[93]

Originally, C&S Boxcar #8197.[118] Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232908).[94] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#704).

Trucks detached in 1978.

712[148] Boxcar, without Trucks 14½ Alley, between Main St. and Alaska St., Skagway, Alaska (2018) Colorado & Southern Ry.

1909[93]

Originally C&S Boxcar #8238. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232916).[94] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#712).[148]

Trucks detached in 1977. Body to local resident.

718 Boxcar, without Trucks Hunz & Hunz Enterprises, adjacent Klondike Highway Mile 2, Skagway, Alaska (2018) Colorado & Southern Ry.

1910[93]

Originally, C&S Boxcar #8365.[118] Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232920).[94] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#718).

Trucks detached in 1978. Body to local resident.

730[149] Boxcar, without Trucks Glacier, Alaska, WP&YR Mile Post 14.1 (2016) Colorado & Southern Ry.

1909[93]

Originally, C&S boxcar 8257. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232933).[94] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#730).[149]

Trucks detached in 1978.

2nd 734 Boxcar, without Trucks WP&YR Mile Post 62.9 (2014) Boxcar #728 and Boxcar 1st 734: Colorado & Southern Ry., 1910;[93]

present combination of Superstructure #728 and Underframe #734: WP&YR, 1954

1954 combination of superstructure from Boxcar #728 and underframe from Boxcar 1st 734. Superstructure originally part of C&S Boxcar #8309 (1910);[118] purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232931);[94] turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#728). Underframe originally part of C&S Boxcar #8392 (1910);[118] purchased by Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232937);[94] turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (1st 734).

Trucks detached in 1978.

746[150] Boxcar Superstructure 4½ Alley, between State St. and Main St., Skagway, Alaska (2018) Colorado & Southern Ry.

1910[93]

Originally, C&S Boxcar #8334. Purchased by U.S. Army in 1943 for use on the WP&YR (USA #232946).[94] Turned over to the WP&YR in 1946 (#746).[150]

Underframe detached in 1960. Body to local resident.

1st 905 Caboose, without Trucks Jewell Gardens, adjacent Klondike Highway Mile 2, Skagway, Alaska (2018) WP&YR

1899

Originally, Stock Car #703. Converted to cupola caboose in 1901, and renumbered to 2nd 901. (1st 901 was out of service from 1902 to 1906.) In 1906, 1st 901 was restored to service and 2nd 901 was renumbered to 1st 905.

Trucks detached and car sold in 1952. Cupola removed by 1987.

2007 Gang Car,

without Wheels

Cemetery Rd. and Shops Rd., just north of Klondike Highway Mile 1.7, Skagway, Alaska (2018) Chassis: Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc., 1961~1967;

cab: WP&YR

Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A5-E (Z36) #222770 (1961), 227447 (1965), 228867 (1966), or 230526 (1967). Retired in 1977.

Wheels detached by 1998. Cannibalized.

236538 Gang Car,

without Wheels

Cemetery Rd. and Shops Rd., just north of Klondike Highway Mile 1.7, Skagway, Alaska (2018) Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc.

1972

Standard gauge. Gasoline-mechanical. Fairmont Model A6-F3-5 #236538. Had 103 hp (77 kW) Ford Motor Co. 240 engine. Originally, Duluth, Missabe & Iron Range Ry. Purchased by WP&YR for parts.

Wheels detached. Cannibalized.

Klondike Mines Ry. Bonanza Creek Boxcar Boxcar Superstructure Just north of former KM Ry. Mile Post 18, which was about ¾ mile south of Flannery, Yukon. Mile Post 18 was also a short distance north of the Bonanza Creek Dam, near Bonanza Creek Road Kilometer 25.[151] (2016) WP&YR

1905[151]

Frame built in 1901. Expected to be used to make WP&YR car. Instead, used to make car assembled in 1905 for sale and use on the KM Ry. One of KM Ry. ##100~124 (even numbers).

Underframe detached between 1906 & 1912.[151]

Klondike Mines Ry. Soda Station Boxcar Boxcar Superstructure Soda Station, Yukon, former KM Ry. Mile Post 27, Ridge Road Heritage Trail Kilometer 30, 2½ kilometers north of Bonanza Creek Road Kilometer 35.[151] (2014) WP&YR

1905[151]

Frame built in 1901. Expected to be used to make WP&YR car. Instead, used to make car assembled in 1905 for sale and use on the KM Ry. One of KM Ry. ##100~124 (even numbers).

Underframe detached between 1906 & 1912.[151]

[129]

Former White Pass off-rail equipment on display[edit]

Equipment with light grey have been either put on display or sold.

Number

or Name

Type

Year Built

Location Remarks
2nd Atlin Barge

1934

SS Klondike National Historic Site,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Built by White Pass. Length = 70 ft.; Volume = 69 gross tons. Canada Official No. 192401.

Originally named Lake Barge. Used on Atlin Lake. Retired in 1950. Officially renamed to Atlin in 1951. Put on display in 1974.

Keno Steam-Stern Wheel Boat

1922

SS Keno National Historic Site,

Dawson City, Yukon

For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.
2nd Klondike Steam-Stern Wheel Boat

1937

SS Klondike National Historic Site,

Whitehorse, Yukon

For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.
Loon Gasoline-Screw Propeller Boat

1922

Mayo, Yukon For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.
Neecheah Diesel-Screw Propeller Boat

1920

Yukon Transportation Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.
Norcom Steam-Stern Wheel Boat

1913

Hootalinqua Island, Yukon Prior to 1913, the above-hull structure was on the Evelyn. The Evelyn’s hull was wrecked in 1913.

For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.

2nd Sibilla Gasoline-Screw Propeller Boat

1932

272 Tagish Ave.,

Carcross, Yukon

For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.
Tarahne Gasoline-Screw Propeller Boat

1917

Trainor Ave. & Lake Rd.,

Atlin, British Columbia

For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.
Woodchuck Gasoline-Screw Propeller Boat

1939

MacBride Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.
Yukon Rose Diesel-Screw Propeller Boat

1929

Dawson City, Yukon For further information, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.
One of ##1, 2, 4, 7, 8 Passenger Wagon

1902, 1903, 1906, or 1915

MacBride Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Wheels replaced.

For further information, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

6 Passenger Wagon

1904

Carcross, Yukon Middle bench seat removed.

For further information, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

9 Passenger Wagon

1917

MacBride Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

For further information, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).
11 Heavy Freight Wagon

1902

MacBride Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Originally, #7. Renumbered to 11 about 1917.

For further information, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

12 Heavy Freight Wagon

1902

Yukon Transportation Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Originally, #8. Renumbered to 12 about 1917. For a time at the museum, this wagon bore its 1902-1916 number “8.”

For further information, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

33 Passenger Sleigh Body

1901

Yukon Transportation Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Originally, #3. Renumbered to 23 about 1904. Renumbered to 33 about 1909. For a time at the museum, this body bore its 1901-1903 number “3.” On display with reproduction bobs.

For further information, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

36 Passenger Sleigh

1901

Alvin D. Tjoelker,

Everson, Washington (2006)

Originally, #6. Renumbered to 26 about 1904. Renumbered to 36 about 1909. Still bears its 1904-1908 number “26.”

For further information, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

37 Passenger Sleigh

1901

MacBride Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Originally, #7. Renumbered to 27 about 1904. Renumbered to 37 about 1909. For a time at the museum, this sleigh bore its 1901-1903 number “7.”

For further information, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

7 Caterpillar D7E Bulldozer

1963

Cemetery Rd. and Shops Rd., just north of Klondike Highway Mile 1.7,

Skagway, Alaska

Caterpillar, Inc. shop #48A2630.

Re-numbered to 2074 between 1979 & 1982. Retired about 1995. In deteriorated condition.

15B Bucyrus-Erie 15B Crawler Shovel/Crane

1948

Skagway Museum,

Skagway, Alaska

Bucyrus-Erie shop #60051.

Retired in 1978 or 1979. Put on display between 1978 & 1997. In deteriorated condition.

24 “Pony Cruiser” Bus

1946

Yukon Transportation Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Kalamazoo Coaches, Inc. shop #8034621. Capacity = 20 passengers.

Wrecked in 1949. Put on display between 1990 & 1996.

531 or 532 Clark Series 500 Straddle Van Carrier

1965

Yukon Transportation Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Built by Clark Equipment Co. Length = 38 ft.; Width = 13 ft.; Height = 20 ft. Used to move containers on and off flatcars and semi-trailers.

One of two units that had been in service at Skagway. Put on display in 2003. The other Skagway unit was #532. The two Whitehorse units were ##536 and 537.

Semi-Trailer for Container Yukon Transportation Museum,

Whitehorse, Yukon

Length = 25 ft.

Put on display between 1990 & 1992.

Origins of White Pass station, passenger car, and preserved boat names[edit]

Aishihik (Cars ##264, 380) is a hybrid word, derived from the Tlingit word for lake, plus the Southern Tutchone phrase for its tail, plus the Tlingit suffix for within a shallow concave landform.[152] More specifically, the English Aishihik was directly derived from the Tlingit Áa Ishiyík,[153] which means Lake Within the /Ishi/ Landform. In turn, /Ishi/ refers to Äshèyi [Its Tail Village], the Southern Tutchone name for the village at the north end of “Aishihik” Lake.[154][155] The lake’s name in Southern Tutchone had been Man Shӓw [Lake, Big].[156][157] Aishihik Lake located 28 kilometers north of Alaska Highway Kilometer 1546, via Aishihik Lake Road. Aishihik River located at Alaska Highway Kilometer 1547.5.

Alsek (Car #314) was derived from a Tlingit verb theme, which means a person habitually rests.[158][159] It was the name of a village located on the original Upper Alsek River (now the Tatshenshini River), near another village named Noogaayík [Within the “Noogaa” Lanform].[160]

Annie Lake (Car #360) was named for Annie Austin (1870–1950), widow of Charles "Dawson Charlie" Henderson (co-discoverer of gold in the Klondike).[161] Lake located 19 kilometers southwest of Robinson, via Annie Lake Road.

Atlin (Car #218 and a Barge) was derived from a Tlingit phrase, which means large lake.[155][158]

Bare Loon Lake (Car 2nd 202) was named for skinny dipping and wailing loons. 1970’s Chilkoot Trail hikers sometimes skinny dipped and sometimes heard loons wail at this lake.[162] Un-officially named “Beaver Lake.”[2][163] This lake is at Chilkoot Trail Kilometer 46.7 and to the west of WP&YR Mile Post 37.

“Beaver Lake” (Car #388) is the un-official name for Bare Loon Lake, which is at Chilkoot Trail Kilometer 46.7 and to the west of WP&YR Mile Post 37.[2][163] There are at least 14 other “Beaver Lake”s in British Columbia.

Bennett (Mile Post 40.6 Station) and Bennett Lake (Car #240) were named for James Gordon Bennett, Jr. (1841–1918), son of the founder of the New York Herald.[155][162][164][165] The lake was originally one of at least four lakes which had borne the Tlingit name kusawa [narrow lake].[166]

Bernard Lake (Car 2nd 209) was named for J. Bernard “Ben” Moore (1865-1919), who helped establish the White Pass Trail.[2][167] Un-officially named “Fraser Lake.”[168] Lake located at Mile Post 27.7 and at Klondike Highway Kilometer 36.5, adjacent to the Fraser station.

Big Kalzas Lake (Car 2nd 230) was named for Kalzas (fl. 1859), an Indian employee of the Hudson's Bay Co.[155]

Big Salmon Lake (Cars ##276, 352) was renamed after the Big Salmon River about 1898; previously had been named "Island Lake." Big Salmon is the English name given to the river, whose Tagish, Tlingit, and Northern Tutchone names mean water in which there is large chinook (king) salmon.[169][170]

Black Lake (Car #216) was named for the lake’s dark appearance, which is caused by the presence of tannic acid and by the lake’s not being fed by glacial runoff. Lake located on the Klondike Highway between Mile 4 and Mile 5.

Boulder (Mile Post 4.5 Station) was named for boulders located in the Skagway River at this location.[163]

Carcross (Mile Post 67.5 Station) was originally named Caribou Crossing, and was renamed in 1904 because of frequent confusion in mail services.[155][163] Carcross also located at Klondike Highway Kilometer 105.6.

Carr-Glynn (former Copper Branch station, 5 rail miles from MacRae) was named for Sir Sidney Carr Glynn (1835-1916), first chairman of the WP&YR.[171] Site located at the south end of Carr-Glynn Lake, 12 kilometers south of Alaska Highway Kilometer 1428.3: three kilometers via Fish Lake Road, plus 9 kilometers via Copper Haul Road.

Chilkat (Car 2nd 205) consists of the Tlingit words chíl (storehouse) and gaat (sockeye [red] salmon).[172][173] Originally, Chilkat was only the name of the Chilkat River [Chilkat Héen]. Chilkat Lake had been Áa Ká [On the Lake].[174] Additionally, the noun compound chíl-gaat is not in a common Tlingit form. A popular explanation for the uncommon form is that Chilkat may have been a loanword from Eyak, which means among caches. However, there are some significant problems with this theory.[175] Most likely, Chilkat Héen was a metaphor, which equated the Chilkat River to a salmon storehouse.[176] Chilkat River extends sinuously between Haines Highway Miles 4.3 and 23.8. Lake located 32 miles northwest of Haines: 26 miles via the Haines Highway, 4 miles via the Chilkat Lake Road, and 2 miles via shallow rivers.

Chilkoot (Car 2nd 204) is a Tlingit phrase which means the flooded storehouse. It corresponds to the sentence chíl-li-koo-t, which means the storehouse is flooded (koot is the participle form of li-koot).[173][177] The name refers to the legendary destruction of a village named X’āastayeekwáan [Under the Waterfall People]. The village is said to have been located near the head of the lower Chilkoot River. Part of a cliff named Léik’wk’ (Little Red Snapper) broke off and fell into Chilkoot Lake. This created a large wave that flooded the river, the village, and the village storehouse(s).[178] Afterwards, a new village was established, named Lkoot [It’s Flooded]. Its residents became known as Chilkoot. Chilkoot Lake located 10 miles north of Haines, via Lutak Road.

Choutla (Car #366) was derived from a Southern Tutchone idiom, which figuratively refers to the waterfalls that feed Choutla Lake. Literally, it means laughing water.[179] Choutla Lake located 7 kilometers east of Carcross, via Tagish Road.

Clifton (Mile Post 8.5 Station) was named for the rock ledge overhanging the tracks at this location.[2][163]

Combo (Car #211) is an abbreviation for combined passenger and baggage car.

Copper River (Car #304) was named for abundant copper deposits along the upper river.[165]

Cowley (former Mile Post 95.1 Station) and Cowley Lake (Car #234) were named for Isaac Cowley Lambert (1850–1909), chairman of the construction company which built the WP&YR railroad.[155][171] Cowley Station access road at Klondike Highway kilometer 148.1. Cowley Lake located at former Mile Post 94.7.

Crag Lake (Car #362) was named for the crag overlooking the lake. Lake located 14 kilometers east of Carcross, via Tagish Road.

Crater Lake (Car 3rd 201) was named for the lake’s crater-like appearance. Lake located at Chilkoot Trail kilometer 28, just north of Chilkoot Pass.[164][171]

Dease Lake (Car #280) was named for Peter Warren Dease (1788–1863), chief factor of the Hudson's Bay Co.[165]

Denver (Mile Post 5.9 Station) was named for the Denver Glacier, the foot of which lies about 3 miles to the east.[2][163]

Dewey Lake (Car #220) most likely named for Adm. George Dewey (1837–1917), U.S. Navy.[180] Lake located ½ mile east of Skagway, via steep hiking trail.

Dezadeash (Car #254) was derived from a Tlingit phrase, which means snare platforms (for fishing).[157][158][173] Dezadeash Lake extends between Haines Highway kilometers 194 and 210.

Drury Lake (Car #336) was named for William S. Drury (1870–1953) of Taylor & Drury, Yukon merchants.[155]

Dugdale (former Mile Post 99.9 Station) was named for James Dugdale (1842-1903), an early White Pass shareholder.[181][182] Dugdale not to be confused with Dundalk, below.

Dundalk (Mile Post 56.3 Station) most likely named by Michael J. Heney for the port city 57 miles east of Killeshandra, Ireland. Heney’s parents had emigrated from Killeshandra to Canada in 1854,[183] probably via Dundalk. The parents were Thomas Heney (1823-1892) and Mary Ann (McCourt) Heney (1834-1911). Dundalk not to be confused with Dugdale, above.

Emerald Lake (Cars ##244, 254) was named for the blue and green light from the surrounding trees that is reflected by the lake’s marl bed.[155] Lake located at Klondike Highway kilometer 117.6.

Fairweather Lake (Cars ##278, 356) is a Yukon Lake which presumably was so named because fair weather usually occurs at this lake. Polar easterlies prevail at this latitude (63° 13' N).

Fantail Lake (Car 2nd 203) was named for the fantail hitch, which is a dogsled hitch in which there is a separate tug line connecting each dog to the sled. The dogs are thereby fanned out in front of the sled. Also known as a fan hitch.[184] Fantail Lake was a part of the Fantail Trail, the winter dogsled trail that extended between Log Cabin and Atlin, British Columbia.[185]

Finlayson Lake (Car #340) was named for Duncan Finlayson (1796–1862), chief factor of the Hudson's Bay Co.[155][165]

Fortymile River (Car #322) was so named because it joins the Yukon River 40 miles below (west-northwest of) Old Fort Reliance.[155][165]

Fox Lake (Car #390) is presumably named for the red fox, which is found throughout the Yukon. Lake received the name Fox by 1940, when a landing field was built near the lake’s location, but before a highway was there.[186] The lake now extends between Klondike Highway kilometers 238 and 248.

Frances Lake (Car #364) was named for Lady Frances Simpson (1812–1853), wife of Hudson's Bay Co. governor, George Simpson.[155][165]

Fraser (Mile Post 27.7 Station) was named for Duncan C. Fraser (1845-1910), a Member of Parliament from Nova Scotia.[171] Fraser also located at Klondike Highway kilometer 36.5.

“Fraser Lake” (Cars 1st 200, #226) is the unofficial name for Bernard Lake.[2][168] Lake located at Mile Post 27.7 and at Klondike Highway kilometer 36.5, adjacent to the Fraser station. A larger and more famous lake in British Columbia is officially named Fraser Lake.

Glacier (Mile Post 14.1 Station) was named for groundwater seepage and freezing at this location. In the early 1900’s, this phenomenon was also referred to as a glacier.[182]

Goat Lake (Car #386) is named for the high concentration of mountain goats in the area.[163] Lake is 1921 feet above, and supplies the water for, Pitchfork Falls at Mile Post 9.5.[2][163][172]

Graves (Mile Post 49.3 Station) and Samuel H. Graves (Car #402) were named for Samuel H. Graves (1852-1911), the first president of WP&YR.[163][171] In 1885, Graves had become an associate of Close Brothers, the firm that later financed the WP&YR.

Heney (Mile Post 12.3 Station) and Michael J. Heney (Car #400) were named for Michael J. Heney (1864-1910), the labor contractor who built the WP&YR railroad.[171][187]

Homan Lake (Car 2nd 208) was named for Charles A. Homan (1848–1944), U.S. Army topographer who accompanied Lt. Schwatka along the Yukon River in 1883.[164]

Hutshi (Car #358) was derived from a Tlingit phrase, which means last lake.[155][157][188] Hutshi Lake was so named because it was the northern-most lake on the Chilkat/Dalton Trail, 51 miles from the trail’s northern end at Carmacks.[189]

Jennings Lake (Car #374) was named for William T. Jennings (1846–1906), civil engineer who assessed various railroad and road routes to the Yukon.[167][171]

Johns Lake (Car #332) was named for John (fl. 1907), a sled dog of Canadian government surveyor Joseph Keele (Joseph, 1861–1923).[155]

Kathleen Lake (Car #270) was named for a girl in Berwickshire County, Scotland, left behind by William "Scotty" Hume (1868–1950), a North-West Mounted Police constable (Reg. #2259) stationed on the Dalton Trail from 1900 to 1902.[190] Lake located at Haines Highway kilometer 219.7.

Keno (Steam-Stern Wheel Boat) was derived from a French term which means five winning numbers; a game of chance.

Klehini (there should be a car so named!) was derived from a Tlingit phrase, which means gravel river.[191] Gravel is in abundance in the Klehini River and Valley.[192] River extends sinuously between Haines Highway Mile 23.8 and Kilometer 87 (corresponding to Mile 50).

Klondike (Car #308 and Steam-Stern Wheel Boat) was derived from a Hän idiom, which figuratively means hammer river.[155][165][193][194] Literally, it means Chinook (King) Salmon River.[195][196] The reason for the figurative meaning is that hammers had been used to erect barriers in the Klondike River, in order to catch the Chinook salmon.[155][165][193][194] Klondike River extends sinuously between Klondike Highway kilometers 664 and 715.

Kluane (Car #258) was derived from a hybrid word, consisting of the Southern Tutchone word for whitefish, plus the Tlingit word for place in which there are.[155][157][158] Kluane Lake extends between Alaska Highway kilometers 1642 and 1701.

Klukshu (Cars ##282, 348) was derived from a Tlingit phrase, which means end of coho salmon.[157][158] Klukshu Lake located at Haines Highway kilometer 183.2.

Kusawa (Car #286) was derived from a Tlingit phrase, which means narrow lake.[155][157][197] Because retreating glaciers often leave long and narrow lakes, there are at least four lakes which had borne this Tlingit name, including the present-day Kusawa Lake.[166] Present-day Kusawa Lake located 24 kilometers south of Alaska Highway kilometer 1489.1, via Kusawa Lake Road.

“LeBarge Lake” (Car #256) is a misspelling of Laberge Lake, which had been named for Michael Laberge (1837-1909), a Yukon River explorer who never actually saw the lake named for him.[155][162][165]

“Lewes Lake” (Car #268) misspells the surname of Alfred B. Lewis (1866-1928), chief locating engineer of the WP&YR, for whom the lake was named.[155][168] Lake located at former Mile Post 83.

Liard (Car #316) is the French word for eastern cottonwood.[165] Liard River extends sinuously between Alaska Highway kilometers 761 and 991.

Lindeman Lake (Car #222) was named for Dr. Moritz K. A. Lindeman (1823–1908), secretary to the Bremen Geographical Society.[162][164][165] Lake extends between Chilkoot Trail kilometers 41 and 52.

Log Cabin (Mile Post 33.0 Station) was named for a structure which was erected by the Tagish Indians.[198] The name “Log Cabin,” and an actual log cabin, predated any Canadian government structure at this location.[199]

Lorne (former Mile Post 79.4 Station) was named for John D. S. Campbell, Marquess of Lorne (1845-1914), Governor-General of Canada, 1878-1883.[155]

Mackenzie River (Car #310) was named for Sir Alexander Mackenzie (1764–1820), Arctic explorer.[165]

MacRae (former Mile Post 104.0 Station) was named for Charles Colin MacRae (1843-1922), an early White Pass shareholder.[171][182] MacRae also located at Alaska Highway kilometer 1413.1.

Marsh Lake (Car #224) was named for Prof. Othniel C. Marsh (1831–1899), of Yale University.[155][164][165] The Tagish name for Marsh Lake was Taagish-áai [lake consisting of breakup water].[200] Lake extends between Alaska Highway kilometers 1367 and 1379.

Mayo Lake (Car #236) was named for Alfred H. Mayo (1846–1923), a Yukon trader.[155][165]

McClintock Lake (Cars ##288, 350) was named for Adm. Sir Francis L. McClintock (1819–1907), an Arctic explorer.[162][164]

McConnell Lake (Car #372) was named for Charles McConnell (1871–1946), postmaster at Robinson.[155] Lake located 3 kilometers west of Robinson, via Annie Lake Road.

McNeil Lake (Car #342) is named for the McNeil River, which flows through the lake. McNeil River was so named in 1951, possibly for James H. McNeill (1871-1951), Yukon Superintendent of Public Roads and Buildings, 1917-1945. The head of the McNeil River is 12 miles upstream from the lake, and is technically the “source” of the Yukon River. The source of a river is the most distant point upstream from the mouth of the river, regardless of assigned name.[201]

McQuesten Lake (Car #338) was named for LeRoy N. "Jack" McQuesten (1836–1909), Yukon trader.[155][165]

Meadows (Mile Post 25.4 Station) was named for the meadows along the Tutshi River (a.k.a. “Thompson River”) at this location.[202] Presumably, the 1899 stable at the south (uphill) end of the Thompson River meadows was so located so that horses could feed on the grass of these meadows.

Morrow Lake (Car 2nd 207) was named for William Richard Morrow (1915–1968), Yukon corrections director, who proposed that convicts maintain the Chilkoot Trail.[203] Lake located at Chilkoot Trail kilometer 31.

Muncho (Car #252) was derived from a Kaska term, which means big lake.[165][204] Muncho Lake extends between Alaska Highway kilometers 698.5 and 710.

Munroe Lake (Car #344) was named for Alexander Munro (1857-1949), boundary survey axe man who broke his leg near this lake in 1901.[155]

Nakina (Car #382) was derived from the Tlingit village name Naak'ina.áa,[158] which means people situated upstream.[205]

Nares Lake (Car 2nd 206) was named for Adm. Sir George S. Nares (1831–1915), an Arctic explorer.[155][162][164][165] Lake located at Klondike Highway kilometer 105.2

Neecheah (Diesel-Screw Propeller Boat) appears to mean peaceful shoreline in Tlingit.[206] Name may be a reference to the absence of sternwheel disturbance on the water.

Nisutlin (Car #272) was a loanword used by the Tagish Indians.[207] Its origin was neither Tagish nor Tlingit.[208] Borrowed from a Southern Tutchone phrase which means strong flow.[209] Nisutlin Bay located at Alaska Highway kilometer 1243.

Norcom (Steam-Stern Wheel Boat) was named for the Northern Commercial Co., an affiliate of the Northern Navigation Co.[210]

Pavey (Mile Post 46.4 Station) was named for Francis Pavy (1837-1902), an associate of Charles Colin MacRae, both investors in the WP&YR.

Peace River (Car #330) was named for the peace treaty made in 1781 along the shores of this river, near its mouth (near Peace Point, Alberta). This treaty settled a territorial war between the Cree and Dane-zaa (Beaver) Indians.[165] River located at Alaska Highway kilometer 55.4.

Peel River (Car #326) was named for Sir Robert Peel (1788–1850), prime minister of Great Britain.[155]

Pelly Lake (Car #346) was named for Sir John H. Pelly (1777–1852), governor of the Hudson's Bay Co.[155][165]

Pelly River (Car #320) was named for Sir John H. Pelly (1777–1852), governor of the Hudson's Bay Co.[155][165] River located at Klondike Highway kilometer 463.6.

Pennington (Mile Post 51.6 Station) was named for Frederick Pennington (1819-1914), an early shareholder of the WP&YR.[163][171]

Porcupine River (Car #324) is presumably named for the North American porcupine, which is found in the region. River received the name Porcupine by 1898.[211] River located at Klondike Highway Mile 6, and across the Skagway River from WP&YR Mile Post 7.3.

“Portage Lake” (Car #267) is the un-official name for the lake at WP&YR Mile Post 30.5, just north (downstream) of Shallow Lake and just south (uphill) of Maud Lake.[168][171] Originally, Áak’u Sáani (Little Lakes in Tlingit).[212] Then, un-officially “Shallow Lake,” until 1899, when Shallow became the official name for the lake just to the south (upstream). Lake also located at Klondike Highway kilometer 41.1.

Primrose Lake (Car #274) was named for Supt. Philip C. H. Primrose (1864–1937), North-West Mounted Police (Reg. #O.56).[155]

Pueblo (former Copper Branch terminal, 11 rail miles from MacRae) was so named by Hibbard E. Porter (1860-1916), who staked a copper claim at this site in 1899.[182] Site located at intersection of Fish Lake Road and Copper Haul Road, 3 kilometers southwest of Alaska Highway kilometer 1428.3, via Fish Lake Road.

Racine Lake (Car #384) was named for Cariste Racine (1851-1926), owner of a sawmill on Tagish Lake, and owner of the White Pass Hotel in Whitehorse.

Red Line (Car #5) was named for the stage and boat line which operated between White Pass, British Columbia, and Carcross, Yukon, from 1898 to 1901.[2][171]

Robinson (former Mile Post 88.9 Station) was named for William C. “Stikine Bill” Robinson (1857-1926), general foreman of construction of the White Pass railroad.[155][171] Robinson also located at Klondike Highway kilometer 139.6.

Rocky Point (Mile Post 6.9 Station) was named for the large rock outcropping at this location, through which the railroad cut was made.[2][163][171]

Schwatka Lake (Car #266) was named for Lt. Frederick G. Schwatka (1849–1892), 3rd U.S. Cavalry, Yukon explorer.[155][162] In 1876, Lt. Schwatka had led the initial cavalry charge at the Battle of Slim Buttes. Schwatka Lake located at former Mile Post 107.7.

Sibilla (Gasoline-Screw Propeller Boat) had been the name of the yacht on which the financier of the White Pass, namely William B. Close, spent much of his youth.[213]

Skagway (Mile Post 0.0 Station) and Skagway River (Car #300) were derived from a Tlingit idiom which figuratively refers to rough seas in the Taiya Inlet, that are caused by strong north winds.[214] Literally, skagway means beautiful woman.[215] The reason for its figurative meaning is that Skagway is the nickname of Kanagoo, the mythical woman who transformed herself into stone at Skagway bay and who (according to legend) causes the strong, channeled winds which blow toward Haines, Alaska.[216] The rough seas caused by these winds are therefore referred to by the use of Kanagoo’s nickname, which is Skagway.[217] The Kanagoo stone formation is likely to be Face Mountain, which is seen from Skagway bay.[218] Skagway also located at Klondike Highway Mile 0.

Spirit Lake (Car #214) was named for the spirit of the Yukon, by U.S. Army troops during construction of the Alaska Highway in 1942.[155] Lake located at Klondike Highway kilometer 116.

Squanga (Car #376) was derived from the Tagish and Tlingit name for “humpback” or lake whitefish.[155][165][219] Squanga Lake located at Alaska Highway kilometer 1315.9.

Stewart River (Car #328) was named for James G. Stewart (1825–1881), who discovered this river in 1849.[155][165] River extends sinuously between Klondike Highway kilometers 535 and 594.

Stikine (Car #306) was derived from a Tlingit idiom, which figuratively refers to whirlpools and eddies found in the Stikine River. Literally, it means river water biting itself.[158]

Summit Lake (Cars 2nd 200, #262) was named for the White Pass summit. Lake located at Mile Post 21, just north of the White Pass summit.[171]

Surprise Lake (Car #370) so named in 1898 by prospectors Kenneth McLaren and Frederick “Fritz” Miller.[220] Previously, one of at least four lakes which had borne the Tlingit name kusawa [narrow lake].[166]

Tagish (Car #248) is a shortened version of Taagish Tóo’e’, which is the Tagish name for the Tagish River.[221] The longer version translates to the water that appears when it is breaking up ["it" being spring ice].[222] Because the Tagish River flows into Marsh Lake, the Tagish name for Marsh Lake was Taagish-áai [lake consisting of breakup water].[200] The Tagish name for present-day Tagish Lake was Taku because the lake provided access to the Taku Tlingit people. Conversely, the Tlingit name for present-day Tagish Lake was Tagish because the lake provided access to the Tagish people.[223] Tagish Lake extends between Klondike Highway kilometers 78 and 95.

Taiya (Car #302) was derived from a Tlingit verb, which means to pack.[158][165][171][224] Taiya River located 8 miles west of Skagway, via Dyea Road.

Takhini (Cars ##284, 354) was derived from a Tlingit metaphor,[176] which literally means broth,[173] and figuratively refers to Takhini Hot Springs.[157] Takhini River located at Alaska Highway kilometer 1468.9, and at Klondike Highway kilometer 195.5.

Taku (Car #318) is a contraction of a longer Tlingit phrase, which means a flood of Canada geese.[158][165]

Tarahne (Gasoline-Screw Propeller Boat) was directly derived from Tarahini, which was the name of a little creek at Atlin. The name Tarahini was suggested to the ship’s carpenter by Chief Taku Jack. Tarahini had been derived from the Tlingit verb theme téya.aahini, which means stream situated on rock.[225] All vocal sounds in Tarahini occur in English. (Tarahini shortens the Tlingit /téya/ to /ta/, and substitutes the English /ra/ sound for the Tlingit aspirated /.aa/ sound.) The reason for the change from Tarahini to Tarahne is not known.

Tatshenshini (Car #312) was derived from a Tlingit phrase which means river with stinking chinook (king) salmon at its headwaters.[226]

Teslin (Car #242) was derived from a Northern Tutchone phrase, which means flowing out.[170] Teslin Lake extends between Alaska Highway kilometers 1244 and 1290.

“Thompson River” (Car #334) is the un-official name of the stream flowing from Meadows (Mile Post 25.4 Station) to Bernard Lake (at Mile Post 28.3). Received the name “Thompson River” by 1899.[202] Most likely, named for Livingston Thompson (1851-1904), surveyor and Secretary of the Bennett Lake & Klondyke Navigation Co. Thompson was also a friend of William J. Rant, the British Columbia agent, magistrate, and assistant land commissioner for Bennett in 1898.[227] The official name of this stream is Tutshi River.[2][168][228]

Tutshi (Car #260) was derived from a Tlingit metaphor,[176] which literally means lake containing charcoal,[229] and figuratively means dark lake.[158] Tutshi Lake is darker than most lakes in the region because it is not fed by glacial runoff. Lake extends between Klondike Highway kilometers 57 and 70.

Utah (former Mile Post 105.5 Station) was the site of a camp of the Utah Construction Co. during construction of the Alaska Highway.[2] Utah also located at Alaska Highway kilometer 1415.7.

Wasson Lake (Car #368) was named for Everett Wasson (1910–1961), first bush pilot in the Yukon.[155]

Watson (Mile Post 59.4 Station) was named for Thomas J. Watson (1861-1926) of Watson & Church, Skagway real estate agents during 1898-1899.[155]

Watson Lake (Car #238) was named for Francis G. "Frank" Watson (1883–1938), a Klondike stampeder.[155][165] Lake located at Alaska Highway kilometer 980.

White Pass (Mile Post 20.4 Station) was named for the Hon. Thomas W. White (1830-1888), Canadian Interior Minister, 1885-1888.[2][163][165][171][172]

Whitehorse (former Mile Post 110.7 Station) was named for the appearance of rapids in Yukon River at this location.[155][165] Whitehorse also located at Alaska Highway kilometer 1429.

Whiting River (Car #378) was named for U.S. Navy Surgeon Robert Whiting (1847–1897).[172]

Yukon (Car #290), or Ųųg Han, is a contraction of the words in the Gwich'in phrase chųų gąįį han, which mean white water river and which refer to “the pale colour” of glacial runoff in the Yukon River.[230][231] The contraction is Ųųg Han, if the /ųų/ remains nasalized, or Yuk Han, if there is no vowel nasalization.[232] In 1843, the Holikachuks had told the Russian-American Company that their name for the river was Yukkhana and that this name meant big river.[233] However, Yukkhana does not literally correspond to a Holikachuk phrase that means big river.[234][235] Then, two years later, the Gwich’ins told the Hudson’s Bay Company that their name for the river was Yukon and that the name meant white water river.[230] White water river in fact corresponds to Gwich’in words that can be shortened to form Yukon.[231] Because the Holikachuks had been trading regularly with both the Gwich’ins and the Yup’iks,[236] the Holikachuks had been in a position to borrow the Gwich’in contraction and to conflate its meaning with the meaning of Kuigpak [River-big], which is the Yup’ik name for the same river. For that reason, the documentary evidence reflects that the Holikachuks had borrowed the contraction Ųųg Han [White Water River] from Gwich’in, and erroneously assumed that this contraction had the same literal meaning as the corresponding Yup’ik name Kuigpak [River-big].

See also[edit]

For the complete roster of White Pass boats, see, List of steamboats on the Yukon River.

For the complete roster of White Pass winter stages, see, Overland Trail (Yukon).

References and notes[edit]

  1. ^ Since 1942, WP&YR computed the tractive effort of steam locomotives by taking 20% of the weight on drivers.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n Johnson, Eric L. (1998). Sea to Sky Gold Rush Route. Rusty Spike Publishing. ISBN 0-9681976-1-2. , at pp. 8 (Denver, Rocky Point), 10 (Clifton), 13 (Pitchfork Falls), 15 (Pitchfork Falls), 27 (White Pass), 31 (Red Line Transportation Co.), 40 (Thompson River … Tutshi River), 43 (Duchess of Wellington), 44 ("Fraser Lake [topographical maps … Bernard Lake]"), 45 (Summit Lake, Fraser Lake, Shallow Lake), 50 (Beaver Lake), 54 (Red Line), 56 (Utah), 83 (Locomotives).
  3. ^ a b c d e f Johnson, Eric L. (1997). The Bonanza Narrow Gauge Railway. Rusty Spike Publishing. ISBN 0-9681976-0-4. , at pp. 145–50.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g Conrad, J. David (1988). The Steam Locomotive Directory of North America. Transportation Trails.  (2 Vols.)
  5. ^ Thompson, Dennis Blake; Richard Dunn & Steve Hauff (2002). The Climax Locomotive. Oso Publishing Co. p. 344. 
  6. ^ Hannum, James S. (2006). South Puget Sound Railroad Mania. Hannum House Publications. ISBN 978-0-9679043-5-1. , at pp. 203, 227-28, 234, 273.
  7. ^ Hannum, James S. (2002). Gone But Not Forgotten: Abandoned Railroads of Thurston County, Washington. Hannum House Publications. ISBN 0-9679043-2-3. , at page 129.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i j From examination of photographs.
  9. ^ a b Ferrell, Mallory H. (1991). Tweetsie Country. Overmountain Press. ISBN 0-932807-58-5. , at page 190.
  10. ^ a b Chappell, Gordon; Robert W. Richardson; and Cornelius W. Hauck (1979). The South Park Line: A Concise History. Colorado Railroad Museum. ISBN 0-918654-12-2. , at page 255.
  11. ^ a b c Ferrell, Mallory H. (1981). C&Sng: Colorado & Southern Narrow Gauge. Pruett Publishing Co. ISBN 0-87108-534-8. , at page 232.
  12. ^ Sloan, Robert E. & Carl A. Skowronski (1975). The Rainbow Route: An Illustrated History of the Silverton Railroad, the Silverton Northern Railroad, and the Silverton, Gladstone & Northerly Railroad. Sundance Publications. ISBN 0-913582-12-3. , at pp. 200, 388.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k See, Stutz, John C. (2013). “Dumped Tender Shells,” White Pass Fanlist No. 12191 (April 16, 2013). Based on dates of tender retirements and the physical descriptions of the eight listed tenders, the sources of the tenders appear to be: Tender A (1949) from #24. Tender B (1949) from Rotary #3 (Lettered “DENVER & RIO GRANDE 243” Later “ON”). Tender C (1949) from #60. Tender D (1949) from 2nd Rotary #2, ex-#57. Tender E (1957) from 3rd 66 superstructure, ex-1st 69. Tender F (1949) from 2nd 61 superstructure, ex-#56. Tender G (1951) from 2nd 66 superstructure, ex-#62. Tender H (1951) from 2nd Rotary #3, ex-1st Rotary #1.
  14. ^ a b c d Pitchard, George E. (2004). Locomotive Roster – Narrow Gauge, 1871–1903: Utah Northern Railroad, et. al., note 13, citing, Union Pacific Ry. Vol. 53, General Journal E (September 1889, November 1889), Nebraska State Historical Society manuscripts. Dates of sale used to determine correspondence between Utah & Northern Ry. numbers and Columbia & Puget Sound R.R. numbers. Only one U&N Brooks 2-6-0 sold in September 1889 (U&N #80, C&PS 2nd 3). Only one U&N Brooks 2-6-0 sold in November 1889 (U&N #94, C&PS 2nd 4).
  15. ^ a b WP&YR #53 was one of the last 10 locomotives built by the Grant Locomotive Works for the Denver & Rio Grande R.R. Because the bubble had burst in the railroad equipment bond market, the D&RG could not pay for these locomotives. So, they were sold instead to the Toledo, Cincinnati & St. Louis R.R. The shop numbers of these 10 locomotives are not directly known. But coincidentally, there are exactly 10 Grant shop numbers in the correct time frame, for which the identity of the corresponding locomotive is not otherwise known, namely ##1443, 1446-1451, and 1456-1458. In March 1882, a New York newspaper had reported the rumor “of one case where locomotives were completed according to order, but were not delivered, because the purchasers could not pay for them.” The newspaper also reported Mr. Grant’s statement that this rumor “related to [an] establishment [other] than his own.” 49 The Sun (New York), No. 212 (March 31, 1882), page 3, Col. 3, ¶¶ 4-5 (Locomotives Going Cheap). Beginning in June 1882, events verified the rumor and revealed that Grant had in fact built the locomotives. Specifically, the TC&StL stated in June 1882 that “The Denver & Rio Grande Railroad Company, being unable to pay for several locomotives ordered to be built several months ago, they have been sold by the builders to the Toledo, Cincinnati & St. Louis Company …” 109 Cincinnati Daily Gazette, No. 144 (June 17, 1882), at page 8, Col. 2. The D&RG’s response was that it “had a contract with the Grant Locomotive Works for forty engines to be delivered last fall. They delivered thirty; the remainder were not delivered within the contract time.” 3 The Railway Age Monthly and Railway Service Magazine 506 (Aug. 1, 1882), Col. 2 (Denver & Rio Grande). In fact, the D&RG had even refused the last two of the 30 Grant locomotives “delivered within the contract time,” namely Grant shop ##1441-1442. Dubits, Robert J. & Lorenz P. Schrenk (1991). Construction List of the Grant Locomotive Works and Its Predecessors. , at pp. 45-46, 48, reproduced in, Hensley, Donald R., Jr. (2007). American Steam Locomotives Builder's List Collection. Tap Lines #400. The D&RG’s inability to pay for the locomotives is substantiated by its own announcement on January 27, 1882 relating to a “changed financial atmosphere” [i.e., the bubble had burst in the railroad equipment bond market]. See, 14 Railroad Gazette 731 (Nov. 24, 1882) (Denver & Rio Grande). As set forth above, shop #1442 had been completed before the 10 TC&StL locomotives were built. In March 1882, the month that the rumor was reported in the newspaper, Grant completed its shop ##1459-1465 locomotives for the Texas & St. Louis Ry. Coincidentally, there are exactly 10 Grant shop numbers between ##1442 and 1459, for which the identity of the corresponding locomotive is not directly known. Dubits and Schrenk (1991). Construction List of the Grant Locomotive Works. , at pp. 47-48. This evidence suggests that the shop numbers of the 10 TC&StL 2-8-0’s are these same 10 otherwise unidentified Grant numbers, namely ##1443, 1446-1451, and 1456-1458. (#1444 had been built for the Richmond & Alleghany R.R. #1445 had been built for the T&StL ##1452-1455 had been built for the Richmond & Danville R.R. Id.) Evidence also suggests that the dates of manufacture corresponding to these 10 Grant shop numbers are January and February 1882. Specifically, Grant reported that “Up to Feb. 1, 1882, [shop #1450] had been completed …” Clayton, W. Woodford, and William Nelson (eds.) (1882). History of Passaic and Bergen Counties, New Jersey, with Biographical Sketches of Many of Its Pioneers and Prominent Men (PDF). Everts & Peck. p. 437. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  16. ^ a b c WP&YR #53 had been Toledo, Cincinnati & St. Louis R.R. #63. To the extent known, the TC&StL almost always assigned road numbers in the same sequence as the corresponding shop numbers of multiple locomotives purchased at the same time. There are only two known contrary instances, both trivial: one involving locomotives of different wheel arrangements (1st 4, #5), and the other involving leased locomotives (##94-95). See, Rehor, John A. (1965). The Nickel Plate Story. Kalmbach Publishing Co. ISBN 0-89024-012-4. , at pp. 431-35; Hensley, Donald R., Jr. (2007). American Steam Locomotives Builder’s List Collection. Tap Lines #400, passim. If the usual TC&StL numbering practice was followed, then TC&StL #63 (WP&YR #53) would have been Grant shop #1451 (Feb. 1882). Its intended D&RG number would have been 236.
  17. ^ 3 The Railway Age Monthly and Railway Service Magazine 443 (July 1, 1882) (Toledo, Cincinnati & St. Louis [N.G.]), citing, 55 Boston Evening Transcript, No. 16,916 (June 13, 1882), at page 8, Col. 2 ("purchase of ten thirty-ton consolidated engines, built for the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad"); 3 The Railway Age Monthly and Railway Service Magazine, at page 506, citing, 109 Cincinnati Daily Gazette, No. 144, at page 8, Col. 2.
  18. ^ Kneeland v. American Loan and Trust Co., 136 U.S. 89, 95-97, 100-01 (1890); Central Trust Co. v. Grant Locomotive Works, 135 U.S. 207, 208, 214, 216, 222, 227 (1890).
  19. ^ September 21, 1887, and September 24, 1887, letters from Elijah Smith (OI Co. president) to Barrows & Co., Oregon Improvement Co. Records, Accession #0249-001, Special Collections, U. of Washington Libraries.
  20. ^ a b c d e Best, Gerald M. (1981). Ships and Narrow Gauge Rails. Howell-North Books. ISBN 0-8310-7042-0. , at pp. 92–93, 140, 142. April 15, 1890, letter from H. W. McNeill (C&PS resident manager) to Elijah Smith (OI Co. president) (I have bought the Olympia and Tenino Railroad). Oregon Improvement Co. Records.
  21. ^ a b c WP&YR Superintendent Report for week ending February 26, 1938, Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park Archives, Skagway, Alaska.
  22. ^ a b May be identified by the 8-inch “patch” around the superstructure base.
  23. ^ a b c d e WP&YR Record of Vouchers (unpublished, 1900–1901), WP&YR Company Records, Yukon Archives.
  24. ^ a b Quastler, Imre E. (1999). Kansas Central Narrow Gauge. South Platte Press. ISBN 0-942035-48-8. , at pp. 8-9, 79, 83-84.
  25. ^ WP&YR Ledger No. 1, Additions & Improvements (unpublished, 1899–1905), WP&YR Company Records, Yukon Archives.
  26. ^ The original Hinkley records, which had been partially copied before they were destroyed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, showed that the locomotive had been built with eight wheels (Hinkley “Cl. 8-”), which would have made it a 2-6-0, rather than an 0-6-0. Starbuck, G. Frank (1895). Hinkley Builders List (##1780-1781), reproduced in, Hensley, Donald R., Jr. (2007). American Steam Locomotives Builder’s List Collection. Tap Lines #400; Edson, William D. (1980). The Hinkley Locomotive Construction Record. Railway & Locomotive Historical Society, Inc. , Railroad History No. 142, at pp. 53-54, 83.
  27. ^ See, Webb, Patrick A. G. (1974). “The Turkey Trail?” 269 Canadian Rail 180, 182 (June 1974) (“The yard at Lethbridge was [in 1893] dual-gauged … [M]otive power in the yard at Lethbridge sported both link-and-pin and knuckle couplers, for moving both narrow and standard-gauge rolling stock – the Hinkley 0-6-0 reportedly being so equipped.”). At a minimum, the standard gauge coupler fixtures most likely required bolts behind the pilot which would have interfered with the lead truck.
  28. ^ a b Lavallée, Omer S. A. (1985). Canadian Pacific Steam Locomotives. Railfare Enterprises, Ltd. ISBN 0-919130-34-8. , at page 380.
  29. ^ a b c d e f Special Report: White Pass & Yukon Route 1901 (unpublished), WP&YR Company Records, Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada.
  30. ^ True, J. D. (1994). It Happened on the White Pass. Northbush Publications. ISBN 1-896079-02-4. , at pp. 53-54.
  31. ^ a b Reisdorff, James J. (1984). Locomotive 69 From Alaska to Nebraska. South Platte Press. ISBN 0-9609568-2-4. , at pp. 3, 6, 11.
  32. ^ See, Gray, Carl R., Jr. (1955). Railroading in Eighteen Countries: The Story of American Railroad Men Serving in the Military Railway Service from 1862 to 1953. Charles Scribner’s Sons. , at page 46. This Army unit was from New Mexico, and Gila monsters are indigenous to New Mexico.
  33. ^ a b The tender superstructure assigned to Loco #69 in 1951 and the tender sold to the Tweetsie R.R. in 1960 were originally from Sumpter Valley Ry. Loco ##18 and 50. The tender from SV Ry. Loco #50 may be distinguished from the tender of SV Ry. Loco #18 by the presence of a peculiar dent at the left front corner of the #50 tender when it was shipped to the WP&YR in 1941. The identical dent still appeared on the tender of Loco #69 in the early 1950s. Thus, Loco #69 received the superstructure from the tender of SV Ry. Loco #50/WP&YR Loco 1st 81. As a further consequence, the tender assigned to Rotary #1 from 1947 to 1950, and sold to the Tweetsie R.R. in 1960, can be identified as the tender from SV Ry. Loco #18/WP&YR Loco #80.
  34. ^ a b c d Dollywood Timeline. Archived 2006-07-10 at the Wayback Machine.
  35. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n In June 1950, Loco ##190, 192, 194, and 196 were still serviceable. Loco ##70 and 71 still retained their original tenders. Loco ##72, 73, 80 and 1st 81 had tenders from retired Loco ##191, 193, 195, and 197. See, Jaques, Francis L. (1951). “Gateway to the Yukon.” 11 Trains, No. 3 (January 1951), at pp. 36 (photo of #81 & tender), 41 (photo of #70 & tender), 42 (“… 190, 192, 194, and 196 are serviceable …”), 43 (“The 190’s … large tenders … were used on the 70’s, the 80’s and the 69 [sic regarding the 69].”). See, also, Cohen, Stan B. (1980). The White Pass and Yukon Route: A Pictorial History. Pictorial Histories Publishing Co. ISBN 0-933126-08-5. , at page 82 (1947 photo, improperly credited, of #80 & tender at dock, with #72 or 73 being off loaded). Loco ##198-200 had been shipped out with their tenders in 1945. This left unserviceable Loco ##191, 193, 195, and 197 as the only four sources for the 190-class tenders reassigned in 1947. Loco ##72 and 73 were delivered without tenders, so they received two of the aforementioned four 190-class tenders in 1947. The cited photos reveal that Loco ##80 and 81 had received the remaining two 190-class tenders also in 1947. Eventually, Loco ##70 and 71, and Rotary ##1 and 2 did receive the tenders of Loco ##190, 192, 194, and 196, in the years from 1950 to 1953.
  36. ^ a b Between July and December 1950, Loco #70 received an oil bearing tender, and Loco #194 was removed from the list of serviceable locomotives. WP&YR (1951). Equipment List as of January 1st, 1951 (Motive Power). Thus, Loco #70 received the tender from Loco #194.
  37. ^ a b In 1951, Loco #71 received an oil bearing tender, and Loco #196 was removed from the list of serviceable locomotives. WP&YR (1953). Equipment List as of January 1, 1953 (Motive Power). Thus, Loco #71 received the tender from Loco #196.
  38. ^ a b Ferrell, Mallory H. (1967). Rails, Sagebrush and Pine. Golden West Books. LCCN 67-28315. , at pp. 106–07.
  39. ^ a b c d Eccles, James R.; Walter Brooks Hawley; William A. Wilt & Robert H. Bergstrom (2002). Steaming Toward Sumpter 1890-2002: A Brief History of the Sumpter Valley Railroad. Sumpter Valley R.R. Restoration. , at pp. 61-62.
  40. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k When ordered from Baldwin, intended to be 1-meter gauge for shipment to Oran, Algeria. In March 1943, reassigned to the WP&YR and assembled to 3-foot gauge.
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Peltier, Mike (2004). “White Pass and Yukon MacArthurs.” 6 Light Iron Digest, No. 4 (August/September 2004), at pp. 8-10.
  42. ^ a b c WP&YR Correspondence of May 22, 1946, from President Rogers to Chairman Hamilton, at page 2 (“For the last two years the Army has used two of their tenders on our rotaries and [the tenders of] three of our old engines … taken out of service took care of the [190-class donor locomotives].”).
  43. ^ a b c Tourret, Richard (1977). United States Army Transportation Corps Locomotives. Tourret Publishing. ISBN 0-905878-01-9. 
  44. ^ a b c Sampson, Henry (editor) (various dates). Jane's World Railways: Railways in South America, "Peru."
  45. ^ a b c d e f g Locomotives of the Rio Grande. 1980. , at page 24.
  46. ^ The shop number of this locomotive is readable in a photo taken in a bone yard at Auburn, Washington between 1944 and 1946. Photographer unknown.
  47. ^ a b Passim, White Pass and Yukon Route Comptroller’s Special Report, for years 1902-1949 (privately held).
  48. ^ a b c Passim, WP&YR Journal (unpublished, 1938–1947), WP&YR Company Records, Yukon Archives.
  49. ^ a b c d Passim, Miscellaneous WP&YR Company Records (unpublished), Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada.
  50. ^ a b c Passim, Lavallée, Omer S. A., and Ronald S. Ritchie (editor) (2005). Narrow Gauge Railways of Canada. Fitzhenry & Whiteside. ISBN 1-55041-830-0. , at page 124.
  51. ^ a b c Passim, Clifford, Howard (1999). Alaska/Yukon Railroads. Oso Publishing Co. ISBN 0-9647521-4-X. 
  52. ^ a b c Passim, Roberts, Earl W. and David P. Stremes (editors) (2008). Canadian Trackside Guide 2008. Bytown Railway Society. pp. 1–92, 4–15. ISSN 0829-3023. 
  53. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Nos. 90-100 did not have a formal General Electric Co. model number. "GEX3341" was an internal GE designation. It was the closest that these locomotives had to a GE designation of their architecture. This designation is used more frequently by rail fans than it was by GE.
  54. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Combes, C. L. (editor) (1970). 1970 Car and Locomotive Cyclopedia of American Practice. Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corp. , § 18: Diesel-Electric Locomotives, at pp. 894, 899.
  55. ^ a b c d e f g The Alco "Model RSD-##" designations had been discontinued by 1969.
  56. ^ Passim, WP&YR Company Diesel Roster Archived 2006-11-12 at the Wayback Machine. (2008).
  57. ^ a b c d e Mullet, Alfred & Leonard Merritt (2009). Sumpter Valley Railway. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 978-0-7385-7125-6. , at pp. 80-83.
  58. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Container flat cars built by National Steel Car Corp. for the WP&YR in 1969. Combes, C. L. (editor) (1970). 1970 Car and Locomotive Cyclopedia of American Practice. Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corp. , § 3: Freight Train Cars, at page 103.
  59. ^ a b c d The trucks on 1st 202 are marked "J. Hammond, 1887." Johnson (1997). The Bonanza Narrow Gauge Railway. , at page 150. A photograph of 1st 202, showing the roof overhang and peculiar clerestory vents, may be found in Trains, February 1963, at page 22. A photograph of 1st 206 may be found at Prince, Bernadine L. (1964). The Alaska Railroad. Ken Wray's Print Shop. , Vol. 1 (of 2), at page 401. Note that the clerestory vents on 1st 202 and 1st 206 are constructed alike. Also, the architectures of 1st 202 and 1st 206 are alike. Thus, the appearances are that both 1st 202 and 1st 206 were built by Hammond in 1887.
  60. ^ a b In 1890, the C&PS acquired a combine and a coach from the O&CV. Oregon Improvement Company Report to Stockholders for 1890-1891 at page 56, at https://books.google.com/books?id=nxooAAAAYAAJ&pg=RA4-PA56#v=onepage&q=&f=false (Jan. 8, 2010); April 24, 1890, letter from H. W. McNeill (C&PS resident manager) to Elijah Smith (OI Co. president) (The narrow gauge rolling stock, which we very much want at Seattle, consists of … passenger coaches, etc.). Oregon Improvement Co. Records.
  61. ^ a b 1st 208’s trucks remaining at Klondike City, Yukon read: "Billmeyer & Small Co., York, PA." Johnson (1997). The Bonanza Narrow Gauge Railway. , at pp. 48, 66, 150. 1st 204 and 1st 208 had the same architecture and both looked like Billmeyer & Small architecture.
  62. ^ a b 67 Steuben Farmers’ Advocate (Bath, N.Y.), No. 48 (November 29, 1882), at page 3, Col. 4 (A.&N.P. Railway – “Up to this time there have been received two freight engines, box and flat cars, mail and baggage cars, two passenger coaches and two combination coaches. Two passenger engines are expected in about two weeks, and other passenger coaches will soon be here.”).
  63. ^ a b Car known to have been owned by Barrows & Co. (dealer) and located on the Billmeyer & Small Co. property at York, Pennsylvania in 1887. November 15, 1887 letter from Elijah Smith (OI Co. president) to Barrows & Co. (We have agreed to buy from you two narrow gauge coaches at York, Pennsylvania). Oregon Improvement Co. Records, U. of Washington Libraries. The managing owner of Barrows & Co. was Eugene G. Barrows (1828-1888). New York City Directory (1887). Trow’s Printing Co., at page 97 (“Barrows, Eugene G., supplies, 66 B’way … Barrows & Co., supplies, 64 B’way”). In 1887, Mr. Barrows was also a director of the newly formed Addison & Pennsylvania Ry., which purchased the assets of the Addison & Northern Pennsylvania Ry. under foreclosure, in the same year. 15 Annual Report of the Secretary of Internal Affairs, Part 4: Railroad, Canal, Navigation, Telephone, and Telegraph Companies (Pennsylvania 1888), at pp. 5-6. Coincidentally, two A&NP passenger cars were sold in 1887. 4 Annual Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of the State of New York (1887), at page 73 (A&NP had 4 second class passenger cars on Sept. 30, 1886); 5 Annual Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of the State of New York (1888), at page 86 (A&P had only 2 second class passenger cars on September 30, 1887 – 2 less than the A&NP had one year before). At least, the architecture of the roofs and roof ends of the full-length A&NP passenger cars match the roofs and roof ends of the cars which Mr. Barrows purchased, and which later became WP&YR ##204 and 208. Hilton, George W. (1990). American Narrow Gauge Railroads. Stanford Univ. Press. ISBN 0-8047-1731-1. , at page 254 (cars behind locomotive cab). (The car at the right end of the A&NP train is a combine.) Mr. Barrows almost certainly was the purchaser of the two A&NP cars that were sold, in view of: (a) his primary business interest in purchasing and selling used railroad cars, (b) his influence as a director of the A&P, (c) his coincidentally obtaining two used narrow gauge passenger cars at the same time the two A&NP narrow gauge passenger cars were sold, and (d) the visual similarity between the cars he purchased and the visible portion of the cars in the cited photograph.
  64. ^ a b November 15, 1887 letter from Elijah Smith (OI Co. president) to Barrows & Co. (We have agreed to buy from you two narrow gauge coaches at York, Pennsylvania). February 8, 1888 letter from William H. Odenatt to Elijah Smith (cars rebuilt). February 23, 1888 letter from Elijah Smith to Billmeyer & Small Co. (I enclose herewith an order for delivery of two narrow gauge passenger coaches now in your possession, belonging to Barrows & Co.). Oregon Improvement Co. Records, Accession #0249-001, Special Collections, U. of Washington Libraries.
  65. ^ a b Deely, Nicholas (1996). Tanana Valley Railroad: the Gold Dust Line. Denali Designs. ISBN 0-9648669-1-9. , at pp. 147–48.
  66. ^ a b c d e f Armbruster, Kurt E. (1999). Orphan Road. Washington State University Press. ISBN 0-87422-185-4. , at page 56; Records Pertaining to the Seattle and Walla Walla Railroad, at pp. 4 (1879 rolling stock), 12 (1880 rolling stock), Burlington Northern, Inc. Company Records, Accession #1972.5375, Box 1, Seattle Museum of History and Industry Library Archived 2011-10-13 at the Wayback Machine., Seattle, Washington.
  67. ^ July 24, 1884 letter from John L. Howard (OI Co. manager) to Elijah Smith (OI Co. president) (1 passenger coach, just overhauled). Oregon Improvement Co. Records.
  68. ^ a b The C&PS owned 1 coach as of July 24, 1884, and October 30, 1884. Letters from John L. Howard to Elijah Smith. Carter "offered to build a first-class plain substantial car." Letter of November 18, 1884, from John L. Howard to Elijah Smith, Oregon Improvement Co. Records. The C&PS owned 2 coaches as of November 30, 1884. Oregon Improvement Company Report to Stockholders for 1885 at page 11, https://books.google.com/books?id=nxooAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA11#v=onepage&q=&f=false (Jan. 8, 2010), and Oregon Improvement Company Report to Stockholders for 1886 at page 8, https://books.google.com/books?id=nxooAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA18-IA8#v=onepage&q=&f=false (Jan. 8, 2010). These appear to have been C&PS ##1 and 2, later WP&YR ##210 and 212.
  69. ^ a b For a view of #214 before being rebuilt by the WP&YR, see, Johnson (1988). Sea to Sky Gold Rush Route. , at page 74. Brill narrow gauge coaches had a distinctive appearance. See, Poor's Manual of Railroads., No. 15 (1882), advertising section at page 116; also in advertising section of years close to 1882.
  70. ^ a b c d e f 13 Railroad Gazette 727 (December 23, 1881), ("J. G. Brill & Co. … recently delivered several narrow-gauge passenger cars to the Texas & St. Louis road.").
  71. ^ a b c d Transfer from T&StL to Cd'AR&N based on common manufacturer, similarity of appearance, and coincidental disappearance/appearance. Official Railway Equipment Guide/Register, various dates: St. Louis, Arkansas & Texas Ry. - Passenger Equipment; Northern Pacific Railroad - Coeur d'Alene Ry. & Nav. Line. In addition, two ex-T&StL locomotives were sold to the Cd'AR&N at that time. This further suggests that the two Cd'AR&N coaches were ex-T&StL. Strapac (1977). Cotton Belt Locomotives. , at page 275.
  72. ^ a b Cd'AR&N Roster as of 12/31/1886, Robertson, Donald B. (1991). Encyclopedia of Western Railroad History Volume 2: The Mountain States. Taylor Publishing Co. ISBN 0-87833-026-7. , at page 206.
  73. ^ a b Wood, John V. (1983). Railroads Through the Coeur d’Alenes. Caxton Printers, Ltd. ISBN 0-87004-291-2. , at page 73.
  74. ^ a b c d SC&CM Miscellaneous Companies & Persons Sub-ledger (Volume 208, unpublished), at page 150; SC&CM Construction & Equipment Sub-ledger (Volume 209, unpublished), at page 122; Penn Central Transportation Co. Records, Manuscripts and Archives Division Archived 2008-09-09 at the Wayback Machine., New York Public Library, Manhattan, New York. (Note: the N.Y.P.L. erroneously lists the SC&CM sub-ledgers as "Boxes" 208 and 209; they should be listed as "Volumes" 208 and 209.)
  75. ^ a b c d e f g h The way to differentiate between the ex-SC&CM (1881) coaches and the ex-Kaaterskill R.R. (1883) coaches is that the SC&CM coaches always had stoves, but the Kaaterskill R.R. coaches had no stoves while on the Kaaterskill R.R. 17th Annual Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of New York, for the Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1899, at pp. 277 and 546. The cars arrived in Skagway in May 1901. WP&YR General Office Journal (unpublished, Jan. 1901 to July 1902), WP&YR Company Records, Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada. ##218 and 220 were put into operation with stoves in June 1901, but ##222 and 224 were put into operation with stoves over a month later. WP&YR Letter dated July 31, 1901, COR 868, f. 5/539, WP&YR Company Records, Yukon Archives. The apparent reason for the delay for ##222 and 224 is that they needed to have the stoves installed.
  76. ^ a b c d “Widening of the [Los Angeles & Redondo Ry.] tracks was completed Oct. 1, 1902 at which time all 3 ft. gauge equipment was sold.” Best, Gerald M. (1958). Early Steam Suburban Railroads In Los Angeles, at page 23, Bulletin No. 99, Railway and Locomotive Historical Society (Oct. 1955). “Electric cars [were expected to] make their initial trip over the Redondo railroad on Thanksgiving Day [November 1902]. … The old steam railroad [had been] practically rebuilt …” 27 Press and Horticulturist (Riverside, California), No. 82 (Oct. 10, 1902), at page 7, Col. 3 (Southern California News). “Los Angeles & Redondo Railway … Date standardized: … 1902” Robertson, Donald B. (1998). Encyclopedia of Western Railroad History Volume 4: California. Caxton Printers, Ltd. p. 139. ISBN 0-87004-385-4. Retrieved 2017-10-16.  Accordingly, from June 30, 1900 until at least August 1, 1902, the LA&R retained all 22 of its 3 ft. gauge passenger service cars. Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of the State of California for the Year Ending December 31, 1900, at page 226 (June 30, 1900 total=22); Poor’s Manual of Railroads, No. 35 (1902), at page 618 (Aug. 1, 1902 total=22). But, it is undisputed that the WP&YR obtained Cars ##218, 220, 222, and 224 in May 1901 in Chicago, 17 months prior to October 1902 and a long distance from Los Angeles. WP&YR Record of Vouchers (unpublished, 1900–1901), at page 4 (“New Coaches”; “Trans chgs on Coaches Chicago to Seattle”), WP&YR Company Records, Yukon Archives; Special Report: White Pass & Yukon Route 1901 (unpublished), at page 123 (“four [4] second-hand coaches bought in Chicago”), WP&YR Company Records, Yukon Archives. Furthermore, during 1885 to 1890, inclusive, Jackson & Sharp Co. sold no cars to the Redondo Ry. (the LA&R’s 1889-1896 predecessor), or to the Rosecrans R.R. or to the San Gabriel Valley Rapid-Transit Ry. (regional prior owners of 3 ft. gauge cars). Jackson & Sharp Co. Engineering Record Book for 1885-1890, Smithsonian Institution, National Museum of American History, Archives Center, Collection NMAH.AC.0156 (J.&S. Car Co. Records). More particularly, all of the passenger cars ordered by or delivered to the Redondo Ry. in 1889 were built by the Laclede Car Mfg. Co. 21 Railroad Gazette 533 (Aug. 9, 1889), Col. 3. All of the SGV R-T cars were built by Carter Bros. 27 Los Angeles Herald, No. 138 (August 21, 1887), at page 8, Col. 1 (News Notes). Finally, there is no record which supports the report that Cars ##218, 220, 222, and 224 came from the LA&R. This unsubstantiated report first materialized after 1983, after the history of these cars had been reported as “unknown,” in Clifford, Howard (1983). Doing the White Pass: The Story of the White Pass & Yukon Route and the Klondike Gold Rush. Sourdough Enterprises. ISBN 0-911803-04-1. , at pp. 79-80.
  77. ^ a b c d Kaaterskill R.R. Construction & Equipment Sub-ledger (unpublished), at page 150, New York Central R.R. Co. Records, St. Louis Mercantile Library, St. Louis, Missouri.
  78. ^ a b The Catskill locals have quit correcting tourists' pronunciation of Kaaterskill, regardless of whether the tourists say /CAT-er-SKILL/, /KATE-er-SKILL/, or /COT-ter-SKILL/. Nowadays, any of these pronunciations will do. The original Dutch pronunciation was /COT-ter-SKILL/, similar in sound to cotter pin. Kaater is the Dutch word for a male wildcat. Kill is the Dutch word for creek.
  79. ^ a b Underframe from Tank Car #68 or 70. Tank Car #68 was originally Union Tank Car Co. (UTLX) #92131 (10,986 US gal (41,590 l; 9,148 imp gal)). Tank Car #70 was originally UTLX #72710 (11,077 US gal (41,930 l; 9,224 imp gal)). Both tank cars had been built by UTLX in 1948 as standard gauge cars, Lot #TC-3263. Kaminski, Edward S. (2003). Tank Cars: American Car & Foundry Company, 1865 to 1955. Signature Press. ISBN 1-930013-09-4. , at page 175 (bottom photo). Tank cars purchased by WP&YR and converted to 3-foot gauge in 1976.
  80. ^ The Nevada-California-Oregon Ry. built much of its own rolling stock.
  81. ^ $3,979.82 was expended on improvements and additions to Nevada-California-Oregon Ry. passenger cars in 1892, resulting in two first class passenger cars at the end of 1892. Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of the State of California 1893-1894, at pp. 118, 124. At the end of 1891, the N-C-O had no first class passenger cars. Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of the State of California for Year Ending Sept. 15, 1892, at pp. 268, 273.
  82. ^ a b Letter from N-C-O Gen. Mgr. to Auditor, attached to N-C-O journal entry (unpublished, 1916), Nevada-California-Oregon Ry. Collection, California State Railroad Museum, Sacramento, California (Coaches ##4 and 6 sold in 1916). The N-C-O back filled car numbers vacated by earlier cars. If there was a 2nd 6, it back filled the number vacated by the 1892-built car. 2nd 4 appears to have back filled the number vacated by a renumbered baggage car.
  83. ^ 12 passenger cars (possibly including two parlor cars) added by South Pacific Coast R.R. in 1884. Report of the Board of Railroad Commissioners of the State of California for Year Ending Dec. 31, 1886, at page 198 (SPC had 63 passenger cars, 2 parlor cars, 7 mail and baggage cars, 12 of which were added in 1884). None of the 12 SPC cars added in 1884 were mail or baggage cars. Poor’s Manual of Railroads, No. 18 (1885), at page 876 (SPC had 53 passenger cars and 7 mail and baggage cars on December 31, 1883). In addition, SPC employee E. W. Chapin stated that 1884 was the year in which this car was built in a June 28, 1898 deposition in lawsuit involving the Southern Pacific Co.
  84. ^ a b c d e f 32 The Western Railroader, #7 (July 1969), at pp. 4, 7-10.
  85. ^ a b c Pullman Company Archives, Call #02/01/06, Vol. 1 & Box 35; Call #07/00/02, Vols. 1 & 20, Newberry Library, Chicago, Illinois.
  86. ^ a b c Dickinson, A. Bray (1970). Narrow Gauge to the Redwoods. Trans-Anglo Books. ISBN 0-87046-010-2. , at page 138.
  87. ^ The Nevada & California Ry. was formed by the Southern Pacific Co. and took over the Carson & Colorado Ry. in 1905. No. 264 is likely to have been to Keeler, California.
  88. ^ No record exists which identifies the year in which Sumpter Valley Ry. Coach No. 26 was converted to a passenger and railway post office combine. However, the conversion did not occur in a vacuum. SV Ry. Baggage and RPO Car #2 was retired in 1928, which then reduced the number SV Ry. RPO’s from three to two. See, Poor’s Railroad Section for 1929, at page 503. In light of the SV Ry’s. car building practices, Car No. 26’s RPO components were likely to have been cannibalized from Car #2. Furthermore, a declining passenger market and a continuing need for a third RPO as a backup would have made 1928 the optimum year in which to convert No. 26.
  89. ^ Passim, WP&YR Company Coach Roster (2008).
  90. ^ Mulvihill, Carl E. (2000). White Pass & Yukon Route Handbook. R. Robb, Ltd. , at pp. 80–85 (Passenger Car History).
  91. ^ a b c May have been one of the companies which built the tanks for ##50-65, namely American Car & Foundry Co., Pressed Steel Car Co., Standard Oil Co., or Standard Steel Car Co. The actual builders’ identities of these UTLX Class V (frameless) tank cars is expected to be included in UTLX Steam Era Tank Cars by Mr. Hile, which is tentatively due to be published in the Spring of 2018.
  92. ^ a b c History of UTLX at page 13.
  93. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p The 1909 and 1910 C&S boxcars may be distinguished from each other by the configuration of the coupler pocket.
  94. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n C&S Allotment for Expenditure #10608 (unpublished, 1942), Colorado & Southern Ry. Records, Robert W. Richardson Railroad Library, Colorado Railroad Museum, Golden, Colorado.
  95. ^ a b c U.S. Army Transportation Corps Contract W2789-TC-925 with the C&S (Mar. 8, 1943), listed in, "Control Board Production-Contracts Now in Force" (unpublished, 31 July 1945), Box 211, Record Group 336, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland.
  96. ^ a b c Gondola #110 built by Pullman Co. as a flatcar (27½ ton capacity), sold to U.S. Army in 1942 (USA #333449). Built up into gondola in 1945. Purchased by WP&YR in 1947 (#881). Renumbered to 110 in 1948. Underframe to Tank Car #10 in 1949.
  97. ^ a b 64 Railway Age, No. 1 (January 4, 1918), at page 72 (1917 Orders for American Railways in France).
  98. ^ a b c Flatcar #316 was built in 1908 as Hart Convertible Car #316 (convertible between longitudinal hopper and gondola). Ordered from Rodger Ballast Car Co., but built by American Car & Foundry Co. Cut down to a flatcar in 1942 (#316). Underframe to Tank Car #27 in 1968.
  99. ^ Of 2,950 total tank cars ordered for use in France during World War I, none arrived by April 1918, and only 549 were ultimately sent there. GPRX ##4001-4500 were immediately preceded by GPRX ##3001-3050. GPRX ##3001-3050 had been built during the winter of 1917-1918, all suggesting that GPRX ##4001-4500 were built in 1918. Circular of United States and Canadian Railroads Showing Capacities of Tank Cars, No. 6-O (July 30, 1919). Edward B. Boyd, agent, at page 47 (GPRX ##3001-3050, 4001-4500); King, Benjamin, Richard C. Biggs, and Eric R. Criner (2001). Spearhead of Logistics: A History of the United States Army Transportation Corps. U.S. Army Transportation Center. p. 107. ISBN 978-0-16-093119-2. Retrieved 2018-02-28.  (“While 2,950 tank cars were ordered from the United States, none arrived by April 1918, and … By the end of the war only 549 tank cars had arrived.”); Ruckman, John H. (ed.) (1920). Technology’s War Record. Alumni Assn. of Massachusetts Institute of Technology. p. 262. Retrieved 2018-02-25.  (“During the winter of 1917-1918 … The Arsenal found a lot of fifty oil-tank cars … and the cars were marked ‘G.P.R.X.’ numbered from 3000 up.”)
  100. ^ No 6500-gallon tank cars were delivered. U.S. Army Ordnance Dept. Tank Cars GPRX ##4001-4500 were five hundred 7089-gallon capacity cars. Circular of United States and Canadian Railroads Showing Capacities of Tank Cars, No. 6-O, at pp. 45-48.
  101. ^ In 1920, car rebuilt and reassigned from carrying sulfuric acid for the Ordnance Dept. to carrying oil, gasoline, and water for the entire Army. U.S. War Department (1921). Report of the Chief of Transportation Service (September 30, 1920), at pp. 1528 (“contracted for the conversion of 300 acid tank cars …”), 1540 (“taken the necessary steps to remodel 300 GPRX Government-owned tank cars of 7,000-gallon capacity in order to render them suitable for carrying fuel oil, gasoline, and water to protect the needs of the War Department …”), 1544 (during Fiscal Year 1920, Army sold off 1,571 tank cars and retained 608 tank cars).
  102. ^ See, 1925-1935 Official Railway Equipment Register (U.S.A. War Department entries); Circular of United States and Canadian Railroads Showing Capacities of Tank Cars, No. 6-O, at page 47 (Army Ordnance Dept. ##4001-4500). Note that Tank Car #27 has two pressure relief valves, apparently to meet the requirement that two such valves were required on tank cars of more than 6500 nominal gallons. At the same time, Tank Car #27 does not appear to have had a capacity much greater than 7,000 gallons, before its repair. The U.S. Army had possession of the tank on Tank Car #27, and it had over three hundred 7,089-gallon tank cars on the eve of World War II. For these reasons, it appears that the tank on Tank Car #27 had been on one of the Army’s 7,089-gallon tank cars.
  103. ^ a b c Gondola #116 built by Pullman Co. as a flatcar (27½ ton capacity), sold to U.S. Army in 1942 (USA #333454). Built up into gondola in 1945. Purchased by WP&YR in 1947 (#886). Renumbered to 116 in 1948. Underframe to Tank Car #28 in 1950.
  104. ^ Flatcar #325 was built by Sumpter Valley Ry. in 1917 (SV #76617), sold to WP&YR in 1942. Underframe for Tank Car #28 from 1949 to 1950. Back to flatcar in 1950. Scrapped in 1967.
  105. ^ a b c d Hodina, Frank J. (2017). UTLX Class X 6,500 Gallon Tank Car. Resin Car Works, at page 2.The UTLX information in this article is also expected to be included in UTLX Steam Era Tank Cars by Stephen W. Hile, which is tentatively due to be published in the Spring of 2018.
  106. ^ Sloan, Robert E, (2008). A Century + Ten of D&RGW Narrow Gauge Freight Cars, 1871 to 1981, 2nd ed. BHI Publications. , at page 341.
  107. ^ a b No. 13236 (60) was modified with replacement underframe in 1924. ##12739 (51), 12757 (65), 12918 (64), 12962 (62), 12976 (59), 13084 (50), 13168 (63), and 13172 (61) (8 cars) were so modified in 1937. ##12770 (58) was so modified in 1930.
  108. ^ These are the original Union Tank Car Co. (UTLX) numbers. UTLX re-numbered these cars in 1947 and, again, in 1956, as follows: #50 = UTLX 13084 (1908), UTLX 88112 (1947), UTLX 11024 (1956); #51 = 12739 (’15), 88113 (’47), 11025 (’56); #58 = 12770 (’07), 88125 (’47), 11027 (’56); #59 = 12976 (’08), 88110 (’47), 11022 (’56); #60 = 13236 (’08), 88128 (’47), 11030 (’56); #61 = 13172 (’08), 88104 (’47), 11016 (’56); #62 = 12962 (’08), 88101 (’47), 11013 (’56); #63 = 13168 (’08), 88103 (’47), 11015 (’56); #64 = 12918 (’08), 88100 (’47), 11012 (’56); #65 = 12757 (’08), 88106 (’47), 11018 (’56).
  109. ^ ##50-61, 63, and 65 have internal steam heating pipes, which occupy 113 gallons per car. Prior to installation of heating pipes, tank capacities of these cars were 113 gallons greater than the numbers shown in this roster. ##50, 51, 59, 61, 63, and 65 had Type E heating pipes installed between 1919 & 1929. ##58 and 60 had Type W heating pipes installed between 1929 & 1947. ##62 and 64 have no heating pipes.
  110. ^ a b c Flatcar #106 built by Pullman Co. (27½ ton capacity), sold to U.S. Army in 1942 (USA #333456). Built up into gondola in 1945. Purchased by WP&YR in 1947 (#887). Renumbered to 106 in 1948. Cut back down to flatcar in 1952. Became underframe of Tank Car #53 in 1980.
  111. ^ Type E heating pipes occupy 113 gallons. Prior to installation of Type E heating pipes, tank capacity was 113 gallons greater than the number shown in the roster.
  112. ^ See, Minter, Roy (1987). The White Pass: Gateway to the Klondike. University of Alaska Press. ISBN 0-912006-26-9. , photo following page 288 (“How to cut the grade through the permafrost …”).
  113. ^ Combes (1970). 1970 Car and Locomotive Cyclopedia of American Practice. , § 3: Freight Train Cars, at page 103.
  114. ^ a b Multi-service cars are characterized by two parallel rows of longitudinal hopper bays, meaning that the hopper bays parallel the rails instead of being perpendicular to the rails. Each of the two rows consists of two bays, for a total of four hopper bays. Each hopper bay has two doors which pivot from the bottom, instead of from the top. Each of the eight doors may be separately controlled and adjusted. This arrangement enables the ballast flow to be controlled or stopped.
  115. ^ a b Lousy paint job. Ghosts of old numbers readable.
  116. ^ Bin floor may pivot at either side. As the bin floor pivots, the contents of the bin slide in the direction of the side that is pivoting. The side of the bin in the direction of the flow then drops, pivoting at its bottom. Large rock (or other formation material) then slides across the "dropped side" and is propelled away from the track.
  117. ^ a b c Ghosts of old numbers readable.
  118. ^ a b c d e f g C&S numbers stenciled on the car interior were not painted over.
  119. ^ a b C&S Allotment for Expenditure #10715 (unpublished, Aug. 1943), Colorado & Southern Ry. Records, Colorado Railroad Museum.
  120. ^ a b U.S. Army Transportation Corps Contract W2789-TC-993 with the C&S (Mar. 23, 1943), listed in, "Control Board Production-Contracts Now in Force" (unpublished, 31 July 1945), Box 211, Record Group 336, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland.
  121. ^ Sumpter Valley Ry., Valuation No. 103, schedule of Sumpter Valley Ry. freight train cars (Interstate Commerce Commission, 1916) (“Caboose Cars – Nos. 2 and 3: [built by] S.V. Ry. Co.”).
  122. ^ 17 East Oregonian (Pendleton), No. 5037 (May 2, 1904), at page 1, Col. 2 (Sumpter Extension, ¶ 4) (“the company is building new refrigerator cars and cabooses”). The Sumpter Valley Ry. had had only 2 cabooses as of June 30, 1897, presumably ##1-2. Poor’s Manual of Railroads for 1898, at page 273. By June 30, 1907, the SV Ry. had 3 cabooses, presumably ##1-3. 1st Report of the Railroad Commission of Oregon (1907), at page 172. Therefore, Caboose #3 would have been included in the reported 1904 SV Ry. car building. It is noteworthy that, while the assembly of this car occurred in 1904, many of the components were cannibalized from older cars.
  123. ^ a b After 1960, ##1000 and 1001 were the only two WP&YR flatcars to have arch bar trucks.
  124. ^ a b c d e f g h Livingston, Jeff (2014). Oahu’s Narrow-Gauge Navy Rail. Arcadia Publishing. p. 96. ISBN 978-1-4671-3197-1. Retrieved 2017-10-16.  (“New railroad equipment ordered in 1942 began to arrive in large numbers in 1944. … The Pressed Steel Car Company supplied the bulk of the flatcars …”). In 1944, the Pressed Steel boxcars and gondolas were delivered. Id. at page 79. As a consequence, the Pressed Steel flatcars were delivered in 1945. As for flatcars manufactured by other than Pressed Steel, WP&YR ##1003 and 1004 and two feet shorter than ##1005-1013 – i.e., 32 ft. vs. 34 ft. For that reason, ##1003 and 1004 were most likely purchased from one of the manufacturers other than Pressed Steel in 1944.
  125. ^ a b c d The Navy order for the flatcars had been placed in 1942, but not filled until 1944 and 1945. Therefore, trucks made in 1942 were not a mismatch for these cars.
  126. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Pullman-Standard Car Mfg. Co. records, Manager’s Cost and Manufacturing Analyses for Cars and Parts, 1938-1954 summary of cars built, MG-393, m.4, Pennsylvania State Archives, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania.
  127. ^ a b c d e f g h i j It is unknown why this expected sale of cars to the F.C. del Estado did not materialize. In 1936 and 1939, the F.C. del Estado had taken over three bankrupt narrow gauges: Ferrocarril Central del Chubut (Central of Chubut Ry.), Ferrocarril Central de Córdoba (Córdoba Central Ry.), and Ferrocarril Transandino Argentino (Argentine Transandine Ry.). In spite of urgent needs, absolutely no rolling stock was imported into Argentina from 1939 to 1946. Stones, H. R. (1993). British Railways in Argentina 1860-1948. P. E. Waters & Associates. ISBN 0-948904-53-4. , at pp. 28, 34, 58-59, 65.
  128. ^ a b A 6th Honolulu-type flatcar, the number of which is unknown, was also delivered to the MC RR in 1996.
  129. ^ a b Passim, WP&YR Equipment Lists as of 1943-1982, Office of Superintendent, Rail Division, privately held.
  130. ^ a b c From North American Equipment Sales Co. company records.
  131. ^ a b c d e f g h WP&YR records do not disclose Fairmont shop numbers of 2000-series track cars, and Fairmont records do not disclose WP&YR 2000-series road numbers. Fairmont sold four A6-F3-3 (Z36)’s to the WP&YR: Shop Nos. 231566 in 1968; and 237978, 237993 and 237994 in 1973. Fairmont also sold seven A6-F4-1 (Z36)’s to the WP&YR: Shop Nos. 241349 and 241350 in Jan. 1976; 242262 and 242263 in Sept. 1976; 243932 and 243933 in 1977; and 244678 in 1978. All except No. 231566 had cab heaters. Of the 11 total A6-F’s sold to the WP&YR, eight are currently (in 2014) in existence: Road Nos. 2018-2022, 2024, 2026, and 2044. These eight have cab heaters.
  132. ^ a b c d e f g h Former No. 2014 is presumed to be Fairmont Shop No. 231566 (1968), because of its significantly lower road number and because all other WP&YR A6-F’s have cab heaters. Road No. 2018 existed before 1976, based on the unique positioning of its original antenna. 2 Short and Narrow Rails, No. 1 (Serial 5, July 1979), at page 27 (lower right photo taken by Ted Schnepf in 1975). Accordingly, Road No. 2018 would be Shop No. 237978, 237993, or 237994 (1973).
  133. ^ a b c d e f g h Missing Road Nos. 2023 and 2025 are presumed to correspond to two A6-F4-1 (Z36)’s that have been removed from the roster. On November 27, 1978, two A6-F’s collided head-on at Mile Post 65.5, two miles south of Carcross, Yukon. "Extensive" damage to the two cars occurred. Thompson, Keith W. & Edward Weinberg (1979). Report of the Inquiry Into the White Pass and Yukon Railway and Other Surface Transportation Services Into and Out of the Yukon. Canadian Transport Commission. , Appendix 2. One or both of Road Nos. 2023 and 2025 may have been in that collision.
  134. ^ a b c d e f g h Current, as well as currently vacant, A6-F Road Nos. 2018-2020, 2021-2022, 2023-2024, 2025-2026, and 2044 are presumed to have been assigned sequentially to the five 1973-1978 A6-F delivery batches. In that event, every shop number and every road number in any batch would be greater than every shop number and every road number in every earlier batch. Within any batch, however, the order of the shop numbers and the order of the road numbers may or may not be inverted. Accordingly, Road Nos. 2018, 2019, and 2020 would be Fairmont Shop Nos. 237978, 237993, and 237994 (1973), in unknown order. Road Nos. 2021 and 2022 would be Fairmont Shop Nos. 241349 and 241350 (Jan. 1976), in unknown order. Road Nos. 2023 and 2024 would be Fairmont Shop Nos. 242262 and 242263 (Sept. 1976), in unknown order. Road Nos. 2025 and 2026 would be Fairmont Shop Nos. 243932 and 243933 (1977), in unknown order. Road No. 2044 would be Fairmont Shop No. 244678 (1978).
  135. ^ The "spud" is the spade or chisel that can vibrate up and down, and anchors the machine to the ground.
  136. ^ Passim, WP&YR Gas Shop records, Skagway Shops, Alaska.
  137. ^ Passim, Fairmont Railway Motors, Inc. records, Martin County Historical Society, Fairmont, Minnesota.
  138. ^ a b c The build information on similar WP&YR Tank Car #5 read: “U.T.C. CO. 2.25.15.” Gerald M. Best Photo Collection #900/4821, California State Railroad Museum, Sacramento, California. However, AC&F actually built this tank for Union Tank Car Co. See, Kaminski (2003). Tank Cars: American Car & Foundry Company. , at page 150,
  139. ^ Pup is a term that was current during the Klondike Gold Rush. A pup is a small second order stream (one which is formed by the confluence of two first order streams), and which is also a tributary to yet another stream. Usually, they flow down gulches on the sides of a valley, into the creek at the bottom of the valley.
  140. ^ It is not known whether the tender superstructure was merely rebuilt with a sloping back or entirely replaced.
  141. ^ No. 406 is the only refrigerator car body recorded to exist since 1962 which (a) did not ever exist at a location different from the then-location of the Klondike Highway/Broadway Station refrigerator car body (which eliminates ##766, 768, 2nd 770 [ex-402]), (b) was built in 1910 (which again eliminates #766), and (c) is not depicted in a photo with damage that is inconsistent with the condition of the Klondike Highway/Broadway Station refrigerator car body (which again eliminates ##768, 2nd 770 [ex-402]).
  142. ^ U.S. Army Transportation Corps Contract W2789-TC-961 with the C&S (Mar. 18, 1943), listed in, "Control Board Production-Contracts Now in Force" (unpublished, 31 July 1945), Box 211, Record Group 336, National Archives and Records Administration, College Park, Maryland.
  143. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m The last 21 remaining 1899-1906 built boxcars and refrigerator cars were “phased out” in favor of containers in 1958. WP&YR (1964). A Decade of Progress (“1958 Phased out and scrapped last of all-wooden flat cars and box cars”); WP&YR (1958). Equipment List as of February 1, 1958 (Freight Equipment); Kemp, Forster A. (1957). “Reports on the White Pass & Yukon Route.” 81 Canadian Railroad Historical Assn. News Report 92 (Sept. 1957) (“large number of bad-order box and refrigerator cars, which are no longer used due to the adoption of containers”).
  144. ^ a b c None of the boxcars and refrigerator cars retired before 1958 appear to have been transferred to and used by local residents. See, Kemp (1957). “Reports on the White Pass & Yukon Route,” at pp. 92-93 (freight car notes compiled in July 1957). According to Mr. Kemp’s July 1957-recorded observations, there were two caboose bodies on private properties in Skagway [1st 905, 1st 911], but there were no boxcar bodies thereon. Also, according to Mr. Kemp, at least 23 freight cars had been dumped into the Skagway River by July 1957, but only seven tenders had been dumped into the river by then. An eighth tender superstructure (ex-#66, nee #69) would be dumped into the river later that same year. See, Stutz (2013). “Dumped Tender Shells,” White Pass Fanlist No. 12191 (Tender E). Its underframe had been removed to build Flatcar #1200 in April that year. This suggests that retired railroad cars were still being dumped into the Skagway River in 1957. Empirical evidence corroborates Mr. Kemp’s observations. Of the thirteen 1899-1906 WP&YR boxcars and refrigerator cars observed and identified by number after 1958, eleven (85%) had been “phased out” in 1958. The two cars retired before 1958 had been maintenance of way boxcars with windows cut in them; one of the two (#642) was retained as a yard office in Whitehorse; the other (#602) was placed on a trash laden, derelict lot in Skagway. Of the eleven numerically identified 1899-1906 cars which were transferred to and used by the local residents, all had been “phased out” in favor of containers in 1958 (##436, 440, 506, 518, 530, 570, 626, 656, 666, 670, 682, some now demolished).
  145. ^ a b The Mile 2.9/Broadway Station boxcar is 28 feet long and has no evidence that an ore door ever existed at the bottom of its “A” end. Among the 1958 phase-out boxcars, only four met these criteria and did not exist at some other location (##530, 538, 540, 590). Of these four, the list can be further narrowed to those three boxcars built in 1899 which bear numbers lower than 568. The pre-568 number is determined by the round holes which engaged the truss rod bolts. These holes are located on the ends of the car next to the corner plates. On boxcars which bear numbers lower than 568, these holes are round, and there are no smaller holes located adjacent to them. On boxcars which bear numbers higher than 566, the holes are square, with two smaller round holes located adjacent to the square holes. The Klondike Highway boxcar has the pre-#568 round truss rod bolt holes. See, also, Spude, Robert L. S. (1983). Skagway, District of Alaska – 1884-1912: Building the Gateway to the Klondike. Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks. , at Appendix: Buildings within the Skagway Historical District (“Broadway Station Restaurant … Kurt Koster[s] constructed this pizza parlor in the spring of 1979, using two vintage 1899 box cars.” [sic, should be: using one vintage 1899 box car and one 1910 refrigerator car]). Of the three pre-#568 boxcars, #538 can be eliminated because photographic evidence shows that #538 had a major hole in the door on its right side, because the metal strap at the bottom of this door had a slight bowing, and because the Mile 2.9/Broadway Station boxcar does not reflect having had either defect. Of the two remaining boxcars, #530 is the only one which has been reported to exist since 1958. #530 has been reported to exist in 1976 – just three years before it disappeared and the Broadway Station restaurant appeared. See, Stutz, John C. (1999). “Re: WP&YR Coaches,” White Pass Fanlist No. 699 (February 24, 1999) (Boxcar 530). In addition, #530 cannot be the car on 17½ Alley, because the 1976 report noted numerous underframe components which are not visible on the car on 17½ Alley. Thus, #530 must be the Mile 2.7/Broadway Station boxcar.
  146. ^ The 17½ Alley boxcar is 28 feet long and has no evidence that an ore door ever existed at the bottom of its “A” end. Among the 1958 phase-out boxcars, only four met these criteria and did not exist at some other location (##530, 538, 540, 590). Of these four, only #590 had a window cut in the side of the car which corresponds to the window which had been cut in the southwest corner of the 17½ Alley boxcar.
  147. ^ a b The Portage Lake boxcar is 30 feet long and has no cutout in its end sheathing to allow the buffer block to abut the underframe directly. On this car, the buffer block abuts the sheathing. As such, the car would have been built in 1906. 30-foot boxcars built in 1900 had the cutout, and 30-foot boxcars built in 1906 did not have the cutout. Among the 1958 phase-out boxcars, only ##688 and 694 had been built in 1906 and are not otherwise accounted for. #694 is eliminated based on a photo of that car which discloses a grab-iron on the “B” end attached upside-down (i.e., bolts under rung). This leaves #688.
  148. ^ a b The boxcar on 14½ Alley is identifiable as a 1909 C&S-type boxcar that has not had its underframe detached to make a flatcar. One of the coupler pockets on this car still contains 1909 C&S-type draft gear. Draft gear connects a coupler to the car’s underframe. The presence of draft gear therefore indicates that the original underframe remains under the car. The underframe would have been detached from a boxcar, if a flatcar had been made from it. Of the 31 WP&YR C&S-type boxcars, ##706, 712, and 720 are the only three which (a) were not cut down to flatcars, (b) were not built in 1910, (c) were not disposed of before 1950, and (d) are not otherwise accounted for. Of these three, #706 had its trucks detached in 1969, #720 had its trucks detached in 1969 in 1972, and neither has been recorded to exist since. The car on 14½ Alley is further identifiable on its left side as #712 by the replacement door, by the two vertical gashes to the left of the replacement door, and by the bowing of the second and third from the bottom grab-irons. (Compare, 712 (1982) and 14½ Alley (2006).)
  149. ^ a b The car at Glacier is identifiable as #730 by comparing a circa 2010 photo of the car at Glacier with a circa 1970 photo of #730, and noting five flaws common to both cars. First, the grab-iron on the right side of the “B” end has the identical bend. Second, there is an identical chunk of wood missing, just above the corner plate on the right side of the “B” end. Third, there is an identical chunk of wood missing along the lower edge, about ¼ of the way from that corner to the car door. Fourth, there is a horizontal gash in the wood, a few inches above the last missing chunk. Fifth, there is a similar gash in the wood on the left side of the “B” end, just below the second grab-iron from the top. (Compare, 730 (196x) and (Glacier 201x).)
  150. ^ a b Since 1961, seventeen Colorado & Southern-type boxcar bodies have been recorded to exist in Skagway, Alaska, or on the WP&YR. Sixteen of the 17 bodies cannot be the 4½ Alley body, based on three reasons. Only #746 is not eliminated by these reasons. First, eight of these bodies (##702, 704, 706, 710, 712, 720, 730, 758) are eliminated because they had been built in 1909, while the 4½ Alley body has 1910 built coupler pockets. Second, six of the nine remaining bodies (##708, 718, 1st 734, 2nd 734 [ex-728], 742, 754) are eliminated because, at one or more times, they have existed at locations different from the then-location of the 4½ Alley body. Third, two of the three remaining bodies (##714, 738) are eliminated because photos of them disclose damages which are inconsistent with the condition of the 4½ Alley body. The foregoing reasons alone indicate that the 4½ Alley boxcar body must have been #746. In addition to the foregoing reasons, all WP&YR C.&S.-type boxcar bodies except ##714, 1st 734, 736, 746, 748, and 754 are eliminated from being the 4½ Alley body because of its 1910 coupler pockets and because its underframe has been detached. Of those last six bodies, ##714, 1st 734, and 754 are eliminated because photos of them disclose damages which are inconsistent with the condition of the 4½ Alley body. Of the remaining three bodies, ##736 and 748 are eliminated because they never had their corresponding C&S numbers recorded. Most likely, the latter two bodies had been demolished before the attempt was made to record the C&S numbers. (#736 is also eliminated because it was a powder car, while the 4½ Alley body had not been part of a powder car.) As with the first three reasons, only #746 is not eliminated. Furthermore, the 4½ Alley boxcar and #754 had nearly identical histories for a time after their underframes were detached. During this initial time, both were located at the same address, both had lumber loading doors installed at their ends, and both were eventually repainted. Since the number of 754 had been recorded before repainting, it is likely that the number of the 4½ Alley boxcar was also recorded before repainting, which would make the 4½ Alley boxcar #746. The cumulative effect of all known evidence indicates that the 4½ Alley boxcar must have been #746.
  151. ^ a b c d e f Johnson (1997). The Bonanza Narrow Gauge Railway. , at pp. 121-22, 124, 126, 152.
  152. ^ See, Edwards, Keri (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). Sealaska Heritage Institute. pp. 47 (áa [lake]), 325 (-yík [inside shallow concave landform]). ISBN 978-0-9825786-6-7. Retrieved 2015-09-14. ; Tlen, Daniel L. (2007). Southern Tutchone Grammar Notes: In the Easy Alphabet, at pp. 3 (shè [tail]), 15 (2.2.1: body parts need a prefix such as a- [its]). Because many Tlingit and Southern Tutchone people knew both languages, these kinds of hybrids could occur.
  153. ^ “… and lake … I-She-Ik lie[s] to the north.” Glave, Edward J. (1892). “Pioneer Packhorses in Alaska – 1.” 44 Century Magazine 676, 682 (September 1892); also quoted in, Wright, Allen A. (1976). Prelude to Bonanza: The Discovery and Exploration of the Yukon. Gray’s Publishing. , at pp. 233-34; Glave, Edward J. (2013). Travels to the Alseck: Edward Glave’s reports from southwest Yukon and southeast Alaska, 1890-91. Yukon Native Language Centre. ISBN 978-1-55242-368-4. , at page 192.
  154. ^ Tlen, Daniel L. (1993). Kluane Southern Tutchone Glossary. Yukon College. , at pp. 42 (Aishihik = Äshèyi), 56 (dän keyi [town, village]), 81 (ä shè [tail]); Tlen (2007). Southern Tutchone Grammar Notes, at pp. 3 (shè [tail]), 15 (2.2.1: body parts need a prefix such as -a).
  155. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am Coutts, Robert C. (2003). Yukon Places and Names. Moose Creek Publishing. 
  156. ^ Tlen, Daniel L. (1993). Kluane Southern Tutchone Glossary. Yukon College. , at page 42 (Aishihik Lake = Man Sho); Tlen (2007). Southern Tutchone Grammar Notes, at page 30 (shӓw [big]).
  157. ^ a b c d e f g The corresponding body of water is located in former Southern Tutchone territory and also has a separate Southern Tutchone name. The reason that the Tlingit name currently prevails is that the early English-speaking explorers and map makers hired mostly Tlingit guides, interpreters, and other informants. When these early explorers and map makers reduced their information to writing, the names used were those given by the Tlingit informants. The literal meaning of a Tlingit name often differed from the literal meaning of the corresponding Southern Tutchone name. See, Tlen (2007). Southern Tutchone Grammar Notes, at page 13 (Lhù’ààn Mân [whitefish place lake] Kluane Lake); Tlen (1993). Kluane Southern Tutchone Glossary. , at pp. 42-50 (Aishihik = Män Sho [Lake Big]; Dezadeash = Tatl’àt Mǟn [Water’s End Lake]; Hutshi = Chu-Yäna Mǟn [A-Type-of-Whitefish Lake]; Kluane = Łù Àn Mǟn [Whitefish Place Lake]; Klukshu = Łu Ghą Mǟna [Fish for People are in the Lake]; Kusawa = Nakhų Mǟn [Raft-Crossing Lake]; Takhini = Gęl Ädhäl [Springs Hot]); Glave (2013). Travels to the Alseck. , at pp. 364-72 (Dasa Dee Arsh, Lake … Dezadeash = Titl’àt Män [head-of-the-lake lake]; Hootchy Eye … Hutshi = Chù ’Yäna Mǟn [a-type-of-whitefish-lake]; I-She-Ik … Aishihik = Män Shäw [Big Lake]; Klukshu Lake … Klukshu = Łu ghą [män] [place for fish [lake]]; Kusu Ah … Kusawa = Nakhü Mӓn [rafting across lake]; Tloo Arny … Kluane = Łù’àn Mǟn [big whitefish lake]); Welcome to Champagne and Aishihik First Nations Traditional Territory (n.d.). Yukon Dept. of Tourism and Culture, #2 (Takhini River Bridge … Näkhü Chù [Rafting across river]).
  158. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Thornton, Thomas F. (ed.) (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú:Our Grandparents’ Names on the Land (PDF). Sealaska Heritage Institute. pp. 24 (#273: Aalséix [Resting]), 57 (#2: T'ooch’ Áayi [Black Lake]; #22: Áa Tlein [Big Lake]; #25: Taiya = Dayéi [to Pack), 62 ("NM": Daas'aadiyáash [Snare Platforms]; "NM": Lux.aaní [Whitefish Place]), 63 ("NM": L'ukshú [End of Coho Salmon]), 68 (T'aakú … is likely a contraction of the longer phrase T’aawák Galakú …), 73 (#15: Naak'ina.áa [Nakina Village], #31: Naak'ina.áa Héeni [Nakina River]), 76 (#121: T'aakú [Flood of Geese]), 145 (Shtax'héen [Biting Itself Water], "motion … found in … whirlpools or eddies in the river"). ISBN 978-0-295-98858-0. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  159. ^ Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 29 (l- (verb classifier), 47 (aa [one]), 204 (ulséix [s/he rests [regularly]]), 294 (suffix -x [repeatedly]). Retrieved 2015-09-14. .
  160. ^ See, Thornton (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú (PDF). pp. 7 (Noogaayík = old Southern Tutchone camp on present-day Tatshenshini River [original Upper Alsek River]), 26 (Noogaayík = inside of /Noogaa/). Retrieved 2017-10-16. ; Glave (2013). Travels to the Alseck. , at pp. 123 (note 63: “old settlement of Noogaayik … Nuu Qua (Tlingit) people who once inhabited this site”), 379 (Nua Qua … Nùghàyik ‘place of the Nua Qua’); Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). p. 325 (-yík [inside shallow concave landform]). Retrieved 2015-09-14.  As a result of arbitrary name changes by the Canadian government in the 1890s, the original Upper Alsek River now bears the name Tatshenshini. Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , at page 230. In turn, the original Tatshenshini River now bears the name Blanchard. Finally, the original Lower Kaskawulsh River is now the new Upper Alsek River. See, Glave (2013). Travels to the Alseck. , at page xv (Changing River Names).
  161. ^ Hare, Greg & Sheila Greer (1994). Désdélé Méné: The Archeology of Annie Lake (PDF). Government of Yukon. pp. 12–13. ISBN 0-9698112-0-9. Retrieved 2017-10-16. ; 1901 Census of Canada, District 206, Subdistrict f-93 (Cariboo Crossing, Yukon), at page 2, ll. 26-27. Note that Charlie told the census that 1864 or 1865 would have been his year of birth. His tombstone indicates 1866 as his year of birth.
  162. ^ a b c d e f g Satterfield, Archie (1993). Klondike Park: From Seattle to Dawson City. Fulcrum Publishing. ISBN 1-55591-165-X. , at pp. 17 (Dr. Lindeman, James Gordon Bennett), 19 (Nares River, Professor O. C. Marsh, Vice-Admiral Sir Leopold McClintock), 21-22 (the lake was named in [Schwatka's] honor; Mike Laberge … never got to see the lake), 143 (Bare Loon Lake).
  163. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Mulvihill (2000). White Pass & Yukon Route Handbook. , at pp. 26 (Boulder), 27 (Denver Glacier), 29 (Rocky Point), 32 (Clifton), 33 (Pitchfork Falls, Goat Lake), 45 (White Pass), 56 (Graves), 57 (Pennington), 58 (Carcross), 73 (one of state’s highest concentrations of mountain goats).
  164. ^ a b c d e f g Schwatka, Frederick (1893). A Summer in Alaska. J. W. Henry. , at pp. 90 (Lindeman Lake), 97 (Crater Lake), 99 (Homan Valley), 100 (Bennett Lake), 110 (Nares Lake), 121 (Marsh Lake), 130 (McClintock Lake). Note that Schwatka's Tlingit language interpreter was Billy Dickinson. And, Billy's mother was Sarah Dickinson, who was Aurel Krause's Tlingit language interpreter. Id., at pp. 103-04.
  165. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa Phillips, James W. (1973). Alaska-Yukon Place Names. University of Washington Press. ISBN 0-295-95259-8. 
  166. ^ a b c The four known pre-1898 Kusawa Lakes were: First, the present-day Kusawa Lake at 60° N, 136° W. Krause, Aurel, and Arthur Krause (1993). To the Chukchi Peninsula and to the Tlingit Indians 1881/1882. University of Alaska Press. ISBN 978-0-912006-66-6. , at pp. 214, 216 (Westlicher Kussooaa); Coutts (2003). Yukon Places and Names. , at page 166. Second, the present-day Surprise Lake. Canada (1908). Seventh Report of the Geographic Board. , at page 72 (Surprise Lake [ex-Kusiwah Lake]); Thornton (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú (PDF). p. 73 (#2: Koosawu Áa [Surprise Lake]). Retrieved 2017-10-16.  Third, the otherwise unnamed lake near the head of the Chilkat River. Id., at page 57 (#15: Koosawu Áa [lake in upper Chilkat River]). Fourth, the present-day Bennett Lake. Krause and Krause (1993). To the Chukchi Peninsula and to the Tlingit Indians. , at pp. 211, 230 (Kussooa [today Bennett Lake]). In addition, both the portage between Lindeman Lake and Bennett Lake, as well as Bennett Lake itself, also had borne the Tlingit name Ch'akúx Anax Dul.adi Yé [Place to Pack a Skin Canoe Over]. The Tagish name for Bennett Lake was Mén Chó [Big Lake]. Sidney, Angela (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. Council for Yukon Indians. , at ##108, 111.
  167. ^ a b John L. Motherwell (2012). Gold Rush Steamboats: Francis Rattenbury’s Yukon Venture. John L. Motherwell. ISBN 978-0-9868982-0-4. , at pp. 34 (Bernard Moore), 191-92 (Jennings).
  168. ^ a b c d e Canada, Parliament (1908). Seventh Report of the Geographic Board of Canada. Sessional Papers. Paper No. 21a. pp. 16 (Bernard Lake), 44 (Lewes Lake [ex-Lewis]), 68 (Shallow Lake), 76 (Tutshi River), plus absence of Fraser Lake, Portage Lake, and Thompson River. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  169. ^ Dawson, George M. (1888). Report on an Exploration in the Yukon District, N.W.T., and Adjacent Northern Portion of British Columbia 1887 (PDF). Geological and Natural History Survey of Canada. p. 151 (note). Retrieved 2017-10-22. 
  170. ^ a b Tom, Gertie (1987). Èkeyi: Gyò Cho Chú (My Country: Big Salmon River). Yukon Native Language Centre. , at pp. 12 (#1: Gyò Cho Chú), 16 (#32: Délin Chú).
  171. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Minter (1987). The White Pass. , at pp. 22 (Dyea), 26 (White Pass), 52 (Summit Lake), 63 (Duncan C. Fraser), 94 (Crater Lake), 99 (W. T. Jennings), 175 (Colin Macrae, Cowley Lambert, Frederick Pennington, Sidney Carr-Glynn), 221-23 (Rocky Point), 274-75 (Red Line Transportation Co.), 275 (William Robinson), 299 (“road … crossed Summit, Fraser, and Portage lakes”), 318 (Cowley Lambert), 332 (Red Line Transportation Co.), 357 (Samuel H. Graves), 358-59 (Michael J. Heney).
  172. ^ a b c d Orth, Donald J. (1967). Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. U.S. Government Printing Office. , at pp. 209 (Chilkat … means “salmon storehouse”), 760-61 (Pitchfork Falls … on stream flowing down from Goat Lake), 1044 (White Pass), 1045 (Whiting River).
  173. ^ a b c d Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 57 (chál [storehouse]), 66 (dáas’aa [snare]), 101 (gaat [sockeye [red] salmon]), 145 (kayáash [platform]), 235 (taxhéeni [broth]). Retrieved 2015-09-14. 
  174. ^ Chilkat River – Krause, Aurel; Erna Gunther (translator 1956) (1885). The Tlingit Indians. Univ. of Washington Press. , at page 253 (“Tschilkat-hīn”); Chilkat Lake – Thornton (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú (PDF). p. 59 (#86: Áa Ká [On the Lake]). Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  175. ^ The form chíl-gaat "|cache-fish| which seems to refer to fish in a cache … is not a noun compound that is commonly used. There is an intriguing possible source of the name in Eyak … which means ‘among the cache(s).’ … [H]owever [chíl] may be a loanword in Eyak rather than an indigenous word … Also [the Chilkat Valley] would be a remarkable place for an Eyak placename …" Crippen, James A. (2010). Multiple correspondences in Tlingit consonants with Proto-Athabaskan-Eyak, at page 3. The article inherently suggests that the similar Upper Tanana, Eyak, and Tlingit words may have separately evolved from a common Proto-Na-Dene ancestor word, rather than any of the current three words being a loanword from another.
  176. ^ a b c Metaphors are often used as place names. Thornton (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú (PDF). p. xvi (“Another type of semantic association is metaphor.”). Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  177. ^ Chíl [storehouse] + li (verb classifier) + koo [flooded] + t [present tense]. See, Story, Gillian L. & Constance M. Naish (1973). Tlingit Verb Dictionary (PDF). University of Alaska. pp. 94, 335 (li-koo [be flooded]), 360 (suffix -t [present tense]). Retrieved 2017-10-16.  Without the verb classifier (li-), chíl-li-koo-t becomes chílkoot, which means the flooded storehouse. Without a verb classifier, a Tlingit verb root will become a participle (verbal adjective) or gerund (verbal noun).
  178. ^ Interview with Austin Hammond, Tlingit Elder, in Dauenhauer, Nora M., and Richard Dauehhauer (eds.) (1994). Haa Kusteeyí: Our Culture. Univ. of Washington Press. ISBN 0-295-97401-X. , 850, 855-57 ("The name of it is Léik’wk’. It protruded way out from the edge of the cliff. That is what broke off. That is the reason Lkoot, this village, the entire village [was flooded]. The wave stretched its arm. … Yes, this has been told from near Raven’s time about this place."); Interview with Sally Burattin, Tlingit Elder ("When that broke off, and the rest of the mountain hit the water, it broke the land bridge that was there. They … called it X’āastayeekwáan, the People that Lived Under the Waterfall. And, when that mountain fell, it washed away all the people."). (“Raven’s time,” in Tlingit mythology, refers to when “Raven” cleverly caused the sun, the moon, and the stars to go into the sky and light up the world.)
  179. ^ See, Tlen (1993). Kluane Southern Tutchone Glossary. , at pp. 36 (chu [water]), 79 (dläw [laugh]).
  180. ^ Only circumstantial evidence exists regarding the source of this name. Dewey Lake is at the head of Dewey Creek, which had been named by 1902. Roppel, Pat (2013). "Skagway’s Castle Kern," Capital City Weekly. Shortly after the Battle of Manila Bay (1898), there were about three other Dewey Creeks in Alaska named for Admiral Dewey. See, Orth (1967). Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. , at pp. 269-70. Furthermore, there were no prominent persons named "Dewey" in Skagway around 1900.
  181. ^ Mr. James Dugdale (1842-1903) was an early White Pass shareholder. Minter (1987). The White Pass. , at p. 175.
  182. ^ a b c d Johnson, Eric L. (2017). The Copper Mines Branch: White Pass Rails into the Whitehorse Copper Belt. Lorne Nicklason. ISBN 978-0-9681976-3-9. , at pp. pp. 1 (Dugdale), 7 (MacRae), 26 (Glacier), 46 (Pueblo).
  183. ^ See, Minter (1987). The White Pass. , at p. 131.
  184. ^ See, Zagoskin, Lavrenty A., and Henry N. Michael (ed.) (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels in Russian America, 1842-1844: The First Ethnographic and Geographic Investigations in the Yukon and Kuskokwim Valleys of Alaska. Univ. of Toronto Press. , at page 294 (note *30) ("harnessing dogs tandem … was introduced by the Russians. The tandem harness replaced the earlier fan-type"). The disadvantages of a fantail are that it is less effective than a tandem hitch, and that the fantail cannot be used at all on narrower trails through wooded areas. The advantage of a fantail is that, if a trail is over terrain that is rough or uneven, each dog has more room to maneuver around or over obstacles, such as rocks or chunks of ice. Lead dogs in a tandem hitch can pull following dogs into such obstacles.
  185. ^ Dickinson, Christine F. & Diane S. Smith (1995). Atlin: The Story of British Columbia’s Last Gold Rush. Atlin Historical Society. ISBN 0-9680193-0-7. , at page 39.
  186. ^ Bennett, Gordon (1978). Yukon Transportation: A History. Parks Canada. p. 123. ISBN 0-660-01671-0. Retrieved 2017-11-14.  The highway was built in 1950. Id., at page 143. The lake’s previous Southern Tutchone name had been Kwätan’aya Mân [Going-Into-the-Bush Lake]. See, Smith-Tutin, Lena (ed.) (2014). Southern Tutchone Language, Unit 1. Champagne and Aishihik Language Programs. , at pp. 17 (män [lake]), 63 (kwäta [bush]) (N’aya is apparently a postposition and participle meaning going into). Fox Lake had been the site of a Southern Tutchone hunting camp. This “Fox Lake” is not to be confused with the “Fox Lake” named for Maj. Fox, U.S. Air Force, which is 12 miles northeast of Marsh Lake.
  187. ^ Newell, Gordon (editor) (1966). The H. W. McCurdy Marine History of the Pacific Northwest. Superior Publishing Co. , at page 46 (“M. J. Heney”).
  188. ^ Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 16 (When possessed, alienable nouns require the possession suffix -[y]i), 47 (áa [lake]), 122 (Hooch! [No more!]). Retrieved 2015-09-14. 
  189. ^ Glave (2013). Travels to the Alseck. , at page 366 (Hootchy Eye Tlingit Hûch’i Âyi ‘last lake’ … The name perhaps refers to the last lake … encountered by travelers heading north).
  190. ^ From etymology information obtained in 2012 from memos at the Haines Junction Da Kų (Our House) Cultural Centre. “Kathleen” may have been a diminutive for Catherine; there were very few people in Scotland at the time with the formal name of Kathleen. Hume was born and lived in Berwickshire County until 1884 (age 16), when he immigrated to Canada without his parents. In 1889, he joined the N-WMP. Eventually, he married a Southern Tutchone girl named Lily, and left numerous descendants in the Haines Jct. area, including a few who worked at the Cultural Centre.
  191. ^ Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 187 (l’éiw [gravel]), 118 (héen [river]), 398 (gravel), 445 (river). Retrieved 2015-09-14. 
  192. ^ Glave (1892). “Pioneer Packhorses in Alaska – 1.” 44 Century Magazine at 677 (“stony valley” of the “Kleeheenee”); Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , at page 233; Glave (2013). Travels to the Alseck. , at pp. 174, 181.
  193. ^ a b Ogilvie, William. "Geography and Resources of the Yukon River." 12 The Geographical Journal, No. 1 (July 1898), at pp. 21, 30 ("means Hammer creek … they used to erect barriers across the mouth to catch salmon by hammering sticks …").
  194. ^ a b Bright, William (2007). Native American Placenames in the United States. University of Oklahoma Press. ISBN 978-0806135984. 
  195. ^ See, 14 Dawson Daily News, No. 59 (Oct. 7, 1912), "Remarkable Work of Archbishop McDonald in Yukon" ("Some of the Indians seem to think that the origin of the name is Ttrhondik or Large Salmon river. The stone hammer used in driving the stakes which formed the sides of the salmon fish traps was called trurh, and this seems to me to be the primary origin of the name of the famous river."); Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , at page 286, note 70 ("Ogilvie translated Trondiuck as hammer-water … This is only one of several versions of the origin of the name …"); Klondike: The Chicago Record’s Book for Gold Seekers. Monroe Book Co. 1897. p. 437 ("Klondike, we are told, means salmon river."). Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  196. ^ See, Ritter, John T. (1978). Han Gwich’in Athapascan Noun Dictionary (PDF). University of Alaska. pp. 22 (tr'ojà' [king salmon]), 66 (wèe trät tr'ödoht'orr [hammer]), 80 (-ndek [most common ending in the Dawson region meaning river]). Retrieved 2017-10-16.  But, see, Bright (2007). Native American Placenames in the United States. , at page 229, which reports that Mr. Ritter later opined that t’ro is a Hän form of hammer which "no longer occurs in isolation." This is certainly possible; however, idioms occur frequently in all languages. In addition, the conflicting translations of Klondike are explained by differing attempts to abbreviate the meaning of an idiom. See, 14 Dawson Daily News, No. 59 (Oct. 7, 1912), and Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , both cited above. Therefore, tr'o•ndek appears more likely to be an idiom in which t’ro is a shortened form of the Hän word tr'ojà' [Chinook salmon].
  197. ^ Glave (2013). Travels to the Alseck. , at page 163 (note 83).
  198. ^ Sidney (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. , Entry No. 105 (“Crow people owned the Log Cabin area. [It was] Skookum Jim [Mason’s father’s] camping ground.”).
  199. ^ Seattle Post-Intelligencer, Special Klondike Edition (October 13, 1897), at page 4, Col. 1 (“Skaguay to log house … 38 [miles]”), Col. 5 (map-“Log House”); Canada, Parliament (1899). Report of the North-West Mounted Police, 1898, Appendix I: Annual Report of Inspector F. L. Cartwright. Sessional Papers. Paper No. 15, at pp, 112-13 (“On 7th July [1898], in accordance with orders received, I proceeded with Sergeant Pulham, to look out a spot on which to put up quarters for the winter. On 8th July, we moved most of our stores to the Log Cabin. … After having established our camp at the Log Cabin, on 16th July, we started to clear the ground preparatory to building. … We started building on Monday, 18th July …”).
  200. ^ a b See, Davidson, George (1883). The Kohklux Map. Yukon Historical & Museums Assn. , at pp. 15, 20. Taagish-áai is a hybrid phrase (taagish [Tagish breakup water] + áai [Tlingit lake consisting of]). This name refers to Marsh Lake’s containing outflow from the Tagish River [breakup water].
  201. ^ The McNeil River flows into the Yukon River via the Nisutlin River, Teslin Lake, and the Teslin River. The approximation most often given for the distance between the head of the McNeil River and the mouth of the Yukon River is 1980 miles. Because of the sinuosity of rivers, because rivers change course, and because of the expense in performing any surveys, the exact length of a long river is not feasible to obtain.
  202. ^ a b White Pass & Yukon Route (1899). Constructed Line of the British Columbia Yukon Railway from the Summit of White Pass to Bennett Lake, British Columbia, as completed, July 6th 1899. Collection of Boerries Burkhardt (Göttingen, Germany).
  203. ^ Norris, Frank B. (1996). Legacy of the Gold Rush: An Administrative History of the Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park. U.S. National Park Service. Retrieved 2017-10-16. , Chapter 3, "Canadians Begin Managing the Chilkoot Trail."
  204. ^ Figueiredo, Renato B. (ed., 2014). Freelang Kaska Online Dictionary (men [lake], cho [big]).
  205. ^ Náakee [upstream] + naa [people] + .áa [to be situated]. Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). p. 328 (AA[1]). Retrieved 2015-09-14.  Without a verb classifier, a Tlingit verb root will become a participle (verbal adjective) or gerund (verbal noun).
  206. ^ Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 192 (neech [shoreline]), 324 (yeil’ [calm]). Retrieved 2015-09-14. ; Ellis, Patricia (2011). The Survivors: The True Stories of Four B.Y.N. Ships that Survived Fire, Flood and Decades of Gruelling Travel on Yukon’s Lakes and Rivers. MacBride Museum of Yukon History. ISBN 978-0-9867649-2-9. , at page 42 (“calm water”).
  207. ^ Dawson (1888). Report on an Exploration in the Yukon District, N.W.T., and Adjacent Northern Portion of British Columbia 1887 (PDF). p. 155 (“river, known to the Tagish Indians as Ni-Sutlin-Hi-Ni”). Retrieved 2017-10-22.  Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , at page 183.
  208. ^ Sidney (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. , at #33 (“Nisaleen probably from Athapaskan”). Mrs. Sidney knew both Tagish and Tlingit, but did not know the origin of the word, suggesting that it was from an Athabascan language other than Tagish. (Tlingit is not an Athabascan language.) The original Tlingit name for the Nisutlin River was Héen Tlein [Big River]. Schwatka, Frederick (1996). Schwatka’s Last Search: The New York Ledger Expedition Through Unknown Alaska and British America. Univ. of Alaska Press. ISBN 0-912006-87-0. , at page 96.
  209. ^ The Southern Tutchone phrase is nàsät-lį (nàsät [strong] + [flow], "į" is nasalized). See, Tlen (1993). Kluane Southern Tutchone Glossary. , at pp. 72 (nàsät [strong]), 74 (nasal vowels); Davidson (1883). The Kohklux Map. , at page 26 (Athabascan suffix -lin [flowing]); Tom (1987). Èkeyi: Gyò Cho Chú. , at page 16 (#32: délin [running out]).
  210. ^ Kitchener, Lois D. (1954). Flag Over the North: The Story of the Northern Commercial Company. Superior Publishing Co. , at pp. 111, 114.
  211. ^ Mulvihill (2000). White Pass & Yukon Route Handbook. , at page 73 (“Other wildlife … porcupines.”); Orth (1967). Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. p. 769 (top of right column-“Porcupine River … published in 1898”). Retrieved 2017-10-16. .
  212. ^ See, Sidney (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. , at #105 (Log Cabin = Áax’w Sáani Xoo [Among the Small Lakes]); Twitchell, Lance A. (2016). Tlingit Dictionary (PDF). Goldbelt Heritage Foundation. pp. 38 (áa [lake]), 219 (-x’i sáani, -x’u sáani [diminutive plural]). 
  213. ^ Vaizey, Wendy (1995). A Brief History of Close Brothers. Close Bros. Group. , at page 2.
  214. ^ Thornton, Thomas F. (2004). Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park Ethnographic Overview and Assessment. U.S. Dept. of Interior. , at page 53 ("Most [1995-2002 Tlingit-speaking informants] agreed that the name [Shԍagéi] refers to the effect of the strong north wind on the waters of Lynn Canal, which generates rugged seas and ‘wrinkled up’ waves.") .
  215. ^ Emmons, George T. (unpublished, 1916). History of Tlingit Tribes and Clans. B.C. Archives, reproduced in, Thornton (2004). Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park Ethnographic Overview and Assessment. , at page 19 ("[S]he was simply called Skagway [‘the beautiful one’]."). The word is also a gerund (verbal noun), derived from the Tlingit verb theme -sha-ka-l-ԍéi, which means, in the case of a woman, to be beautiful. See, Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). p. 107 (This verb is used to describe a beautiful woman). Retrieved 2015-09-14.  A gerund was created by omitting the verb classifier "-l-," thus rendering a noun. See, Id., at pp. 29-30 (Every Tlingit verb must have a classifier).
  216. ^ Krause and Krause (1993). To the Chukchi Peninsula and to the Tlingit Indians. , at pp. 195 ("two bays on our right" [1st = Skagway]), 197-98 ("Kanagu, the stone woman who lives in the first of the above-mentioned bays … is sending one snowstorm after another."), 230 ("22. [Kanagu is a] mythical woman who is supposed to have turned to stone and unleashes winds when angry; the rock is in the Taiya Valley [sic, ‘Valley’ should be ‘Inlet’]."), 158 ("The god or goddess [Kanagu, note 22], the personified river that empties into the Dejah Valley [sic, ‘Valley’ should be ‘Inlet’]"), 120 and 202 (river name = Schkaguḗ); Emmons (1916). History of Tlingit Tribes and Clans, reproduced in, Thornton (2004). Klondike Gold Rush National Historic Park Ethnographic Overview and Assessment. , at page 19 (Skagway is reportedly derived from the following legend: "[T]he rock wall opened and [Skagway] disappeared forever. But when the North wind blows down from the White Pass, … it was believed to be the breath of her spirit …"); 343 The Desert News, No. 19 (July 22, 1936), at page 14 ("There is a legend surrounding the name of Skagway. … To this [yet unnamed] village came a beautiful maiden … At last they beheld a mountain open and receive [the maiden] into a huge cavity which was afterward closed. The tradition is that every time a stranger crosses … White Pass and returns, that person brings with him the dread north wind which is the curse of Skagway.").
  217. ^ “Ben” Moore stated that Skagway “is, of course, an Indian name the meaning of which would take too long to explain in detail.” Moore, J. Bernard (1997). Skagway in Days Primeval: The Writings of J. Bernard Moore, 1886-1904. Lynn Canal Publishing. ISBN 0-945284-06-3. , between pp. 96-97 (Aug. 2, 1904 Skagway Speech). Ben and his father founded Skagway, Ben’s wife was a Tlingit Indian, and he conducted trade with the Tlingits. The Tlingits apparently explained to him the “long … detail[ed]” meaning of Skagway.
  218. ^ Except for the fact that "Kanagoo … lives in [Skagway] bay," the identity of the Kanagoo stone formation is not recorded. However, Face Mountain’s Tlingit name translates to Kanagoo’s Image. Thornton (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú (PDF). pp. 52–53 (Face Mountain = Kanagoo's Image). Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  219. ^ Sidney (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. , Entry No. 23 (“calls them ‘little humpbacks’ … Tagish and Tlingit languages have the same name for this fish.”). Ironically, Squanga Lake also contains whitefish now known as “Squanga whitefish,” which are different from the lake [humpback] whitefish which gave this lake its name.
  220. ^ See, Motherwell (2012). Gold Rush Steamboats. , at page 98.
  221. ^ The reason that the Tagish Indians adopted one of the two versions to identify themselves is that, prior to 1898, they spent their winters along the Tagish River. See, Dawson (1888). Report on an Exploration in the Yukon District, N.W.T., and Adjacent Northern Portion of British Columbia 1887 (PDF). p. 165 (“on the east bank of the river, … the Tagish people … reside during the winter”). Retrieved 2017-10-22. ; Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , at page 186. In the summers, the tribesmen would fan out in all directions. Id. Their winter home was the one location that they all had in common. It was common for smaller bands of Indians to use a local geographic feature to identify themselves. See, e.g., Thornton (2012). Haa Léelk'w Hás Aaní Saax'ú (PDF). p. xix (Col. 2). Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  222. ^ See, Sidney (1980). Place-Names of the Tagish Region, Southern Yukon. , Entry No. 54 (Tagish Narrows = Taagish Tóo’e’ [breakup [of ice, e.g.] - water]). The prefix de- or taa- [it]; tu or tóo’ [water]. Figueiredo, Renato B. (ed., 2014). Freelang Tagish Online Dictionary. Gish may have been a loanword from Tlingit. The Tlingit verb root geesh is an idiom, which figuratively means to get wet, and literally means to be like kelp. See, Story and Naish (1973). Tlingit Verb Dictionary. , at pp. 245-46 (geesh [wet]), 314 (geesh [wet]). Broken up spring ice does get wet. The suffix -e’ may be the Tagish possession suffix.
  223. ^ Schwatka (1996). Schwatka’s Last Search. , at page 67. Tagish Lake was officially given the Tlingit name Tagish by George M. Dawson, because Dawson’s guides had been Tlingit.
  224. ^ See, Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 29 (di- (verb classifier)), 313, 365 (yaa [to carry]). Retrieved 2015-09-14. 
  225. ^ Jack, Johnny Taku (Nov. 3, 1978 interview). Robert G. McCandless Fonds, Sound Recording 103(3), Accession No. 88/109R, Yukon Archives, Whitehorse, Yukon, at 1 minute, 18 seconds (Johnny was one of Chief Taku Jack’s sons); Steele, Peter (1995). Atlin’s Gold. Caitlin Press. ISBN 0-920576-47-8. , at page 153 (abbreviated explanation). Téya.aahéeni = [rock] + ya [intransitive verb classifier] + .aa [to be situated] + héen [stream water] + i [possession suffix].
  226. ^ Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 16 (When possessed, alienable nouns require the possession suffix -[y]i), 56 (chán [stink]), 118 (héen [river]), 216 (shá [head of]), 251 (t’á [chinook [king] salmon]). Retrieved 2015-09-14. ; Crippen (2010). Multiple correspondences in Tlingit consonants, at page 4. The river which originally had borne the name Tatshenshini, and which actually has stinking chinook salmon at its headwaters, is now known as the "Blanchard River." As a result of arbitrary name changes by the Canadian government in the 1890s, the river which now bears the name Tatshenshini does not have stinking chinook salmon. See, Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , at page 230 ("… the east fork of [the Alsek] river system … today is known as Tatshenshini …"); Glave (2013). Travels to the Alseck. , at page xv (Changing River Names).
  227. ^ See, Motherwell (2012). Gold Rush Steamboats. , at pp. 44-45. Both Livingston Thompson and William J. Rant had previously been British Army captains. Id., at page 44. In 1898, the BL&KN operated a freighting service over the White Pass Trail – and along this river – using 200 horses. 80 Daily Colonist (Victoria, B.C.), No. 47 (Aug. 5, 1898), at page 5, Col. 3; Motherwell (2012). Gold Rush Steamboats. , at page 55. In 1899, these horses were sub-subcontracted to the WP&YR to haul sleighs between White Pass and Bennett – again along this river. Minter (1987). The White Pass. , at page 275 (“subcontracted pack trains of horses and mules”). Because the river is in British Columbia, Rant would have been instrumental in naming it. By 1899, Livingston Thompson was the only Thompson for whom Rant would have had reason to name the river.
  228. ^ Wright (1976). Prelude to Bonanza. , Map #4, between pp. 58-59 (Tutshi River).
  229. ^ Edwards (2009). Dictionary of Tlingit (PDF). pp. 16 (When possessed, alienable nouns require the possession suffix -[y]i), 47 (áa [lake]), 255 (t’ooch’ [charcoal]). Retrieved 2015-09-14. . Tlingit had fewer adjectives than other languages. Id., at page 14 (a very small category in Tlingit). This shortage of adjectives occasionally necessitated the use of substitute lexical items, such as metaphors. Sometime after Tutshi Lake had acquired its name, the word t’ooch’ did evolve also to be a standard adjective meaning black. If t’ooch’ had been an adjective meaning black at the time that the lake acquired its name, then the name would not have needed the possession suffix (-i). The name would have been Áa t’ooch’ [Lake Black].
  230. ^ a b “Dear Sir, I have great pleasure in informing you that I have at length after much trouble and difficulties, succeed[ed] in reaching the ‘Youcon’, or white water River, so named by the (Gwich’in) natives from the pale colour of its water. …, I have the honour to Remain Your obᵗ Servᵗ, John BellHudson’s Bay Company Correspondence to George Simpson from John Bell (August 1, 1845), HBC Archives, D.5/14, fos. 212-215d, also quoted in, Coates, Kenneth S. & William R. Morrison (1988). Land of the Midnight Sun: A History of the Yukon. Hurtig Publishers. p. 21. ISBN 0-88830-331-9. Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  231. ^ a b In Gwich’in, adjectives, such as choo [big] and gąįį [white], follow the nouns that they modify. Thus, white water is chųų gąįį [water white]. White water river is chųų gąįį han [water white river]. Peter, Katherine (1979). Dinjii Zhuh Ginjik Nagwan Tr’iłtsąįį: Gwich’in Junior Dictionary (PDF). Univ. of Alaska. pp. ii (ą, į, ų are nasalized a, i, u), xii (adjectives follow nouns), 19 (nitsii or choo [big]), 88 (ocean = chųų choo [water big]), 105 (han [river]), 142 (chųų [water]), 144 (gąįį [white]). Retrieved 2017-10-16. 
  232. ^ Gwich’in vowels may or may not be nasalized. A hook under a vowel, as in “ų,” indicates that the vowel is nasalized. Peter (1979). Dinjii Zhuh Ginjik Nagwan Tr’iłtsąįį. , at page ii (footnote). English, of course, has no nasalized vowels.
  233. ^ "[The Yukon] in the language of the Kang-ulit (Yup’ik) people is Kvikhpak; in the dialect of the downriver Inkilik (Holikachuk), Yukkhana; of those upriver (Koyukon), Yuna. All these terms mean the same thing in translation–‘Big River.’ I have kept the local names as a clearer indication of the different tribes along the river." Lt. Zagoskin’s Note 63 (1848), translated in, Zagoskin and Michael (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels. , at page 295. Zagoskin did not come into contact with the Gwich’in Indians and had no access to the information that Yukon means white water river in Gwich’in – the language from which the word came.
  234. ^ In Holikachuk, big river or big water would be xinmiksekh, xinchux, toomiksekh, or toochux. Kari, James, et. al. (1978). Holikachuk Noun Dictionary (PDF). Univ. of Alaska Fairbanks. p. 19. Retrieved 2017-10-16.  (xin [river], too [water]); Zagoskin and Michael (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels. , at page 309 (Inkilik proper [Holikachuk] tu [water], miksekh [large]); Hargus, Sharon (2008). Vowel quality and duration in Deg Xinag (PDF). Univ. of Washington. p. 29 (note 33: Holikachuk chux [big]). Retrieved 2017-10-16.  Adjectives followed the nouns that they modified in Holikachuk.
  235. ^ Thirty-nine pages of cited "Sources," representing over a century of research, did not verify Zagoskin’s report that Yukon means big river. Orth (1967). Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. , at pp. 6-44 ("Sources of Names"), 1069 ("The Eskimo … descriptively called it ‘Kuikpak’ meaning ‘big river.’ The Indian name ‘Yukon’ probably means the same thing."). Orth does not say "probably" when discussing Kuikpak’s meaning. Orth’s use of "probably" is limited to the discussion of Yukon’s meaning, which indicates that Zagoskin’s report that Yukon means big river was never verified. In addition, Orth’s "Sources" do not even include the Hudson’s Bay Company correspondence, which states that Yukon means white water river in Gwich’in. Nor do Orth’s "Sources" include aboriginal dictionaries.
  236. ^ Lt. Zagoskin reported that: “The … Inkilit [Holikachuk] … live along the routes of communication between the Yukon and the coast and are occupied almost exclusively with buying up furs from the natives living along the Yunnaka (Koyukuk River, a Yukon tributary).” Zagoskin also reported that: “The Inkalik [Holikachuk] …, who are chiefly occupied in trading both with their fellow tribesmen and with the neighboring tribes of Kang-ulit (Yup’ik Eskimo), have adopted the way of life of the latter …” Zagoskin and Michael (1967). Lieutenant Zagoskin’s Travels. , at pp. 196-97, 244. Because they had adopted the Eskimo way of life, and because they were the ones trading upriver, the Holikachuk would have been "the Esquimaux" referred to in John Bell’s 1845 report: "The Esquimaux to the westwards likewise ascends the ‘Youcon’ and carry on a trade with the natives, as well as with the Musquash [Gwich’in] Indians … I have seen a large camp of the latter tribe on the Rat River on my return, who, had about a doz: of beat [hammered] Iron Kettles of Russian Manufacture which they bartered from the Esquimaux." See, Hudson’s Bay Company Correspondence to Simpson from Bell (1845), HBC Archives, D.5/14, fos. 212, 213. For these reasons, the Holikachuk were in a position to conflate the meanings of the Gwich’in and Yup’ik names, and to furnish this conflated information to the Russian-American Company.

Notes on Aboriginal Place Names

Many White Pass passenger car names were partly derived from aboriginal place names. In order to represent aboriginal place names in writing, the pronunciations of these names had to be conformed to English phonology. The aboriginal languages had no written alphabet. Glave, Edward J. (1892). “Pioneer Packhorses in Alaska – 1.” 44 Century Magazine 673 (September 1892) (no written language); Glave (2013). Travels to the Alseck. , at page 5. Furthermore, they had about 12 sounds that do not occur in English. Therefore, there were no symbols which corresponded to these non-English sounds. If the aboriginal place names were to be preserved in writing, the pronunciations had to be conformed to English sounds.

An example of a sound which does not occur in English is the initial consonant in the word Tlingit. It is a lateral sound, which means that it is made to the side of the tongue. Begin by holding the tip of the tongue against the roof of the mouth, as you would when you begin to pronounce a /d/ or /t/ sound. Then drop a side of the tongue and make a /thl/ sound on that side.

In addition, aboriginal place names usually describe some prominent characteristic of the place. Descriptive place names were needed as a tool to guide the traveler. See, Davidson, George (1883). The Kohklux Map. Yukon Historical & Museums Assn. , at page 25. The aboriginal traveler had to commit to memory only the description of a place, and no additional arbitrary name. This was of assistance, because the aboriginal languages had not been reduced to writing prior to the arrival of the English or Russian language.

As a consequence of having access only to information that could be remembered, people in the pre-1900 aboriginal societies had to deal with the world quite differently from people today.

External links[edit]