Mu'izzi

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Amīr ash-Shu‘arā’ Abū Abdullāh Muḥammad b. ‘Abd al-Malik Mu‘izzī (also written Mu'ezzi) of Neyshāpūr (born Nisa 1048 CE, died 1125) was a Persian[1] poet. He ranks as one of the great masters of the Persian panegyric form known as qasideh.

Mu‘izzī's father, ‘Abd al-Malik Burhānī, was poet laureate of Sanjar under Malik Shāh I and Sultān Sanjar. His son followed, self-consciously, in his footsteps, styling himself as his father's deputy (nāyib) and inheriting his role.[1][2] He was renowned both in his own time and to later scholarship.[3]

His surviving divan extends to 18,000 distichs. Anvari accuses Mu'izzi of copying the verses of other poets (which cannot be proven for certain), yet Anvari himself is known to have copied Mu'izzi's verses. Mu'izzi is said to have died by the arrow shot at him by the King's son in 1125 CE for reasons unknown. He was accidentally shot by Sanjar.[2]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Granville, E. G. (1997) A Literary History of Persia ISBN 0-936347-66-X
  2. ^ Granville, E. G. (1997) A Literary History of Persia ISBN 0-936347-66-X

References[edit]

  1. ^ Donzel, E. J. van (1 January 1994). Islamic Desk Reference. BRILL. p. 291. ISBN 90-04-09738-4. Muizzi*, Muhammad b. Abd* al-Malik: Persian panegyrist of the Saljuq period and poet laureate of the Great Saljuqs Malik Shah II and Sanjar; 1049ca. 1125. 
  2. ^ A. A. Seyed-Gohrab, Courtly Riddles: Enigmatic Embellishments in Early Persian Poetry (Leiden: Leiden University Press, 2010), p. 113.
  3. ^ A. A. Seyed-Gohrab, Courtly Riddles: Enigmatic Embellishments in Early Persian Poetry (Leiden: Leiden University Press, 2010), p. 113-14.

See also[edit]