NGC 3626

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NGC 3626
NGC3626 - SDSS DR14.jpg
SDSS image of NGC 3626
Observation data (J2000 epoch)
ConstellationLeo
Right ascension11h 20m 03.794s[1]
Declination+18° 21′ 24.45″[1]
Redshift0.004977[2]
Helio radial velocity1488 km/s[2]
Distance74.72 ± 0.39 Mly (22.91 ± 0.12 Mpc)[3]
Apparent magnitude (V)10.98[4]
Apparent magnitude (B)11.80[4]
Characteristics
Type(R)SA0+(rs)[5]
Other designations
Caldwell 40, UGC 6343, MCG+03-29-032, PGC 34684[2]

NGC 3626 (also known as Caldwell 40) is an unbarred lenticular galaxy[5] and Caldwell object in the constellation Leo. It was discovered by William Herschel, on 14 March 1784. It shines at magnitude +10.6[6]/+10.9. Its celestial coordinates are RA 11h 20.1m , dec +18° 21′. It is located near the naked-eye-class A4 star Zosma, as well as galaxies NGC 3608, NGC 3607, NGC 3659, NGC 3686, NGC 3684, NGC 3691, NGC 3681, and NGC 3655. Its dimensions are 2′.7 × 1′.9.[6] The galaxy belongs to the NGC 3607 group some 70 million light-years distant, itself one of the many Leo II groups.[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Skrutskie, M. (2006). "The Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS)". The Astronomical Journal. 131 (2): 1163–1183. Bibcode:2006AJ....131.1163S. doi:10.1086/498708.
  2. ^ a b c "NGC 3626". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 2021-02-13.
  3. ^ Tully, R. Brent; et al. (2013). "Cosmicflows-2: The Data". The Astronomical Journal. 146 (4). arXiv:1307.7213. Bibcode:2013AJ....146...86T. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/146/4/86.
  4. ^ a b "Search specification: NGC 3626". HyperLeda. Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1. Retrieved 2021-02-13. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b "Results for object NGC 3626 (NGC 3626)". NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database. California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 2021-02-13. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ a b Erdmann, Jr., Robert E. (1996–2008). "Object Data". The NGC / IC Project. Retrieved 2008-08-11.[permanent dead link]
  7. ^ Powell, Richard (2006). "The Leo II Groups". Atlas of The Universe. Retrieved 2008-08-11.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Coordinates: Sky map 11h 20m 03.8s, +18° 21′ 25″