One World Sports

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One World Sports
ONE World Sports logo.jpg
Launched August 25, 2011 (2011-08-25)
Closed March 2017 (2017-03)
Owned by One Media Corporation
Slogan Beyond Boundaries
Country United States
Language English
Broadcast area National
Headquarters Stamford, Connecticut
Replaced by Eleven Sports Network

One World Sports (stylized ONE World Sports) was an American sports-oriented cable and satellite television channel. Owned by One Media Corporation, which was led by Seamus O'Brien, the network was primarily devoted to international sports, including soccer, the England cricket team, KHL, the Champions Hockey League, and others. It was the main broadcaster of the New York Cosmos of the North American Soccer League, whose chairman was head of the network.[1]

In March 2017, One World Sports was quietly shut down amidst financial difficulties, and "certain distribution assets" of the network were sold to international broadcaster Eleven Sports, who replaced it in its channel allotments with the Eleven Sports Network.

History[edit]

One World Sports was established in 2011 by One Media Corporation, a company led by Seamus O'Brien, chairman of the New York Cosmos of the NASL.[1] The network acquired many of the sports rights formerly accumulated by the America One network.

In November 2016, the channel's staff was furloughed as a cost-cutting measure after it failed to receive a round of funding. It was also reported that the channel was exploring a possible sale.[1] In March 2017, the channel was quietly replaced on television providers by a new channel branded as Eleven Sports Network. There were also allegations that the network was behind on paying the freelancers and other employees who worked for the channel.[2]

On March 16, 2017, Eleven Sports, co-owned by Italian entrepreneur Andrea Radrizzani (stakeholder of Leeds United F.C., and executive of the sports marketing agency MP & Silva) and The Channel Company, officially announced that it had acquired "certain distribution assets" of One World Sports. The brand already operated networks in Belgium, Luxembourg, Poland, Singapore, and Taiwan. Financial details of the sale were not disclosed.[3] The same day, the Cosmos announced a new regional television deal with MSG Network and WPIX-TV.[4]

In response to the unpaid One World Sports staff, Eleven's group marketing director Danny Menken emphasized they had only acquired the network's distribution assets and stated that "people that have issues with [OWS] have to contact management, but we have no shares or relationship beyond the acquisition of distribution assets." One World Sports has become the subject of multiple lawsuits over unpaid freelancers and subcontractors.[5][6]

Programming[edit]

Former programming[edit]

Soccer

Ice hockey

Basketball

Baseball

  • Home games of the Yomiuri Giants (Stopped covering before the start of the 2016 season)

Arena football

Cricket

Golf

Table tennis

  • ITTF Table Tennis Pro Series

Badminton

Darts

Mixed martial arts

  • Abu Dhabi Warriors Fighting Championship

Highlight shows and weekly series

  • OneAsia Tour Golf Highlights
  • England National Cricket Team Highlights
  • Badminton World
  • Football Asia
  • The Football Review
  • NASL Highlights

Soccer

Rugby

Field hockey

Aquatics

  • Aquatic Super Series

On air talent[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "One World Sports Furloughs Staff". Multichannel News. November 30, 2016. Retrieved March 17, 2017. 
  2. ^ "ONE World Sports Relaunches as Eleven Sports; Questions Regarding Unpaid Freelancers Remain". Sports Video Group. Retrieved March 17, 2017. 
  3. ^ "Eleven Sports Buys One World Assets". Multichannel News. Retrieved March 17, 2017. 
  4. ^ "Cosmos Unveil Spring TV Schedule". Multichannel News. Retrieved March 17, 2017. 
  5. ^ "SVG Sit-Down: Eleven Sports Managing Director Danny Menken on the Launch of America’s Newest Sports Network". Sports Video Group. Retrieved April 6, 2017. 
  6. ^ "Update: Former One World Sports Freelancers Remain Unpaid". Sports Video Group. Retrieved 18 April 2017.