Oofy Prosser

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Oofy Prosser
Drones Club character
First appearance "The Knightly Quest of Mervyn" (1931)
Last appearance Ice in the Bedroom (1961)
Created by P. G. Wodehouse
Portrayed by Richard Dixon
Information
Full name Alexander Charles Prosser
Nickname(s) Oofy
Gender Male
Nationality British

Alexander Charles "Oofy" Prosser is a recurring fictional character from the stories of British comic writer P. G. Wodehouse, being the millionaire member of the Drones Club. He is also a friend of Jeeves's master Bertie Wooster. The most wealthy and envied member of the Club, he has the nickname "Oofy", which is British slang for "wealthy" or "made of money".[1]

Overview[edit]

Because Oofy is both constantly being asked for £5 or £10 and a miser for loans, "a man in whose wallet moths nest and raise large families", he is considered ugly on both the inside and the outside – the pimples on his face being quite famous.

Bertie compares him with Reginald "Kipper" Herring in Jeeves in the Offing; "Kipper" (with his cauliflower ear) would have been an unsafe entrant to have backed in a beauty contest, even if the only other competitors had been Boris Karloff, King Kong and Oofy Prosser ....

However, Oofy can be a big spender (serving strawberries in winter, at a cost of around a pound sterling each), or a fierce gambler (in a casino, or on bets).

Appearances[edit]

Oofy is featured in:

Oofy is mentioned in several stories, including:

Adaptations[edit]

Oofy Prosser was featured in 8 episodes (out of 23) of the 1990–1993 British TV series Jeeves and Wooster (in seasons 1–2 and 4, aired 1990–1991 and 1993 in the UK), played by Richard Dixon.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Sources consulted
Endnotes
  1. ^ "Prosser" was also late 19th century British slang, meaning a "beggar", one who cadges loans, and thus his surname puns on standard English beggar and beggar, slang for a "bloke" or "chap"; the entire name thus meaning "wealthy bloke". "oofy". CollinsDictionary.com. Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 11th Edition. Retrieved October 21, 2012. oof, n, Slang: money (C19: from Yiddish ooftisch, from German auf dem Tische on the table (referring to gambling stakes))  – [Adjective "oofy" being slang for "wealthy" or "loaded", literally "monied" or "made of money".]

External links[edit]