Pemberton Township, New Jersey

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Pemberton Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Pemberton
Hanover Street
Hanover Street
Motto: "A Community of Lakes"[1]
Pemberton Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Pemberton Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pemberton Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pemberton Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°57′31″N 74°36′17″W / 39.958575°N 74.604632°W / 39.958575; -74.604632Coordinates: 39°57′31″N 74°36′17″W / 39.958575°N 74.604632°W / 39.958575; -74.604632[2][3]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 10, 1846
Government[8]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Body Township Council
 • Mayor David A. Patriarca (D, term ends December 31, 2018)[4][5]
 • Administrator Dennis González[6]
 • Municipal clerk Amy Cosnoski[7]
Area[2]
 • Total 62.501 sq mi (161.875 km2)
 • Land 61.284 sq mi (158.724 km2)
 • Water 1.217 sq mi (3.151 km2)  1.95%
Area rank 20th of 566 in state
4th of 40 in county[2]
Elevation[9] 66 ft (20 m)
Population (2010 Census)[10][11][12]
 • Total 27,912
 • Estimate (2016)[13] 27,567
 • Rank 82nd of 566 in state
4th of 40 in county[14]
 • Density 455.5/sq mi (175.9/km2)
 • Density rank 448th of 566 in state
28th of 40 in county[14]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08015 - Browns Mills[15]
08068 - Pemberton[16][17]
08064 - New Lisbon[18]
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 726, 894[19]
FIPS code 3400557510[2][20][21]
GNIS feature ID 0882089[2][22]
Website www.pemberton-twp.com

Pemberton Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 27,912,[10][11][12] reflecting a decline of 779 (-2.7%) from the 28,691 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 2,651 (-8.5%) from the 31,342 counted in the 1990 Census.[23]

Pemberton was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 10, 1846, from portions of New Hanover Township, Northampton Township (now known as Mount Holly Township) and Southampton Township. Portions of the township were taken to form Woodland Township on March 7, 1866.[24] The township is named for James Pemberton, a property owner in the area.[25]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 62.501 square miles (161.875 km2), including 61.284 square miles (158.724 km2) of land and 1.217 square miles (3.151 km2) of water (1.95%).[2][3]

Browns Mills (2010 Census population of 11,223[26]), Country Lake Estates (3,943 as of 2010[27]), Pemberton Heights (2,423 as of 2010[28]) and Presidential Lakes Estates (2,365 as of 2010[29]) are census-designated places and are located within Pemberton Township, while Fort Dix (1,765 out of a total population of 7,716 as of 2010[30]) is a CDP located in parts of Pemberton Township, New Hanover Township and Springfield Township.[31]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Birmingham, Browns Mills Junction, Comical Corner, Commercial Corner, Deep Hollow, Earlys Crossing, Hanover Furnace, Lower Mill, Magnolia, Mary Ann Furnace, Mount Misery, New Lisbon, Ong's Hat, South Pemberton Township, Upper Mill, Upton and Whitesbog.[1][32]

Within the borders of the township lies the independent municipality of Pemberton borough, one of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.[33] The township borders Eastampton Township, New Hanover Township, Southampton Township, Springfield Township, Woodland Township and Wrightstown in Burlington County; and Manchester Township and Plumsted Township in Ocean County.[34]

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve.[35] Part of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Burlington County, along with areas in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.[36]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 2,866
1860 2,672 −6.8%
1870 1,946 * −27.2%
1880 2,086 7.2%
1890 1,805 −13.5%
1900 1,493 −17.3%
1910 1,679 12.5%
1920 1,444 −14.0%
1930 1,929 33.6%
1940 2,386 23.7%
1950 4,751 99.1%
1960 13,726 188.9%
1970 19,754 43.9%
1980 29,720 50.5%
1990 31,342 5.5%
2000 28,691 −8.5%
2010 27,912 −2.7%
Est. 2016 27,567 [13][37] −1.2%
Population sources: 1850-2000[38]
1850-1920[39] 1850-1870[40]
1850[41] 1870[42] 1880-1890[43]
1890-1910[44] 1910-1930[45]
1930-1990[46] 2000[47][48] 2010[10][11][12]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[24]

2010 Census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 27,912 people, 9,997 households, and 7,078 families residing in the township. The population density was 455.5 per square mile (175.9/km2). There were 10,749 housing units at an average density of 175.4 per square mile (67.7/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 67.53% (18,848) White, 20.49% (5,719) Black or African American, 0.37% (104) Native American, 2.89% (806) Asian, 0.13% (37) Pacific Islander, 3.00% (837) from other races, and 5.59% (1,561) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.92% (3,326) of the population.[10]

There were 9,997 households out of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.8% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.2% were non-families. 23.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.74 and the average family size was 3.22.[10]

In the township, the population was spread out with 24.6% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.5 years. For every 100 females there were 99.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 97.1 males.[10]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $63,309 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,246) and the median family income was $73,757 (+/- $4,726). Males had a median income of $49,446 (+/- $2,760) versus $38,713 (+/- $3,404) for females. The per capita income for the township was $26,240 (+/- $1,523). About 7.9% of families and 10.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.8% of those under age 18 and 5.8% of those age 65 or over.[49]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[20] there were 28,691 people, 10,050 households, and 7,487 families residing in the township. The population density was 465.2 people per square mile (179.6/km²). There were 10,778 housing units at an average density of 174.8 per square mile (67.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 66.03% White, 23.12% African American, 0.46% Native American, 3.18% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 2.89% from other races, and 4.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.63% of the population.[47][48]

There were 10,050 households out of which 37.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.5% were non-families. 20.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.22.[47][48]

In the township the population was spread out with 27.6% under the age of 18, 9.5% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 21.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 97.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.7 males.[47][48]

The median income for a household in the township was $47,394, and the median income for a family was $52,860. Males had a median income of $36,572 versus $26,689 for females. The per capita income for the township was $19,238. About 6.2% of families and 9.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.5% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.[47][48]

Economy[edit]

Portions of Pemberton Township are part of an Urban Enterprise Zone that was one of seven established by legislation in 1996. In addition to other benefits to encourage employment within the Zone, shoppers can take advantage of a reduced 3½% sales tax rate (versus the 7% rate charged statewide) at eligible merchants.[50][51]

Pemberton Township is home to Deborah Heart and Lung Center, founded in 1922.[1]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Pemberton Township is governed within the Faulkner Act (formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law) under the Mayor-Council form of municipal government (Plan 1), implemented based on the recommendations of a Charter Study Commission as of January 1, 1991, changing from a five-member Township Committee form based on the results of a referendum passed by voters in 1989.[52][53][54] The governing body consists of a Mayor and a five-member Township Council, all of whom are elected at-large in partisan elections to serve four-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either two seats (and the mayoral seat) or three seats up for election during even-numbered years as part of the November general election.[8][55] Voters approved a November 2006 referendum to change from having all five council seats up for vote simultaneously to a system in which the elections are staggered every two years. Under the terms of the change, the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes in the November 2010 election would serve full four-year terms, with the three other winners serving two-year terms.[56] As the three winners with the lowest number of votes in the 2010 election, the terms of Rick Prickett, Sherry Scull and Diane Stinney ended in December 2012.[57]

As of 2016, the Mayor of Pemberton Township is Democrat David A. Patriarca, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018.[4] Members of the Pemberton Township Council are Council President Jason Allen (D, 2018), Letha Jackson (D, 2018), Kenneth Cartier (D, 2016), Jack Tompkins (R, 2016; elected to serve an unexpired term) and Norma Trueblood (D, 2016).[58][59][60][61][62]

In March 2016, the Township Council appointed former councilmember Kenneth Cartier to fill the seat expiring in December 2016 that became vacant following the death of Diane Stinney.[63]

Sherry Scull resigned from office in August 2015 due to issues related to her state pension.[64] In September, the Township Council selected Thomas J. Cathers Sr., from a list of three candidates nominated by the Democratic municipal committee to fill the seat on an interim basis. In the November general election, Republican Jack Tompkins was elected to fill the balance of the term through December 2016.[65]

The Police Department consists of 57 officers and is headed by Chief David Jantas.[66]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Pemberton Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[67] and is part of New Jersey's 8th state legislative district.[11][68][69]

New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Tom MacArthur (R, Toms River).[70] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[71] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[72][73]

For the 2016–2017 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 8th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Dawn Marie Addiego (R, Evesham Township) and in the General Assembly by Maria Rodriguez-Gregg (R, Evesham Township) and Joe Howarth (R, Evesham Township).[74] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[75] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[76]

Burlington County is governed by a Board of chosen freeholders, whose five members are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year; at an annual reorganization meeting, the board selects a director and deputy director from among its members.[77] As of 2017, Burlington County's Freeholders are Director Bruce Garganio (R, Florence Township, term as freeholder and as director ends December 31, 2017),[78] Deputy Director Kate Gibbs (R, Lumberton Township, term as freeholder ends 2018; term as deputy director ends 2017),[79] Linda Hughes (R, Evesham Township, 2017),[80] Ryan Peters (R, Hainesport Township, 2018)[81] and Latham Tiver (R, Southampton Township, 2019)[82][77][83] Burlington County's Constitutional Officers are County Clerk Tim Tyler (R, Fieldsboro, 2018),[84] Sheriff Jean E. Stanfield (R, Westampton Township, 2019)[85] and Surrogate Mary Ann O'Brien (R, Medford Township, 2021)[86]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 13,972 registered voters in Pemberton Township, of which 4,639 (33.2% vs. 33.3% countywide) were registered as Democrats, 2,433 (17.4% vs. 23.9%) were registered as Republicans and 6,893 (49.3% vs. 42.8%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 7 voters registered to other parties.[87] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 50.1% (vs. 61.7% in Burlington County) were registered to vote, including 66.4% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 80.3% countywide).[87][88]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 6,304 votes here (65.3% vs. 58.1% countywide), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 3,157 votes (32.7% vs. 40.2%) and other candidates with 105 votes (1.1% vs. 1.0%), among the 9,657 ballots cast by the township's 14,741 registered voters, for a turnout of 65.5% (vs. 74.5% in Burlington County).[89][90] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 6,680 votes here (63.9% vs. 58.4% countywide), ahead of Republican John McCain with 3,566 votes (34.1% vs. 39.9%) and other candidates with 143 votes (1.4% vs. 1.0%), among the 10,461 ballots cast by the township's 14,378 registered voters, for a turnout of 72.8% (vs. 80.0% in Burlington County).[91] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 5,223 votes here (55.7% vs. 52.9% countywide), ahead of Republican George W. Bush with 4,025 votes (42.9% vs. 46.0%) and other candidates with 93 votes (1.0% vs. 0.8%), among the 9,379 ballots cast by the township's 13,510 registered voters, for a turnout of 69.4% (vs. 78.8% in the whole county).[92]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 3,060 votes here (57.9% vs. 61.4% countywide), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 2,092 votes (39.6% vs. 35.8%) and other candidates with 69 votes (1.3% vs. 1.2%), among the 5,284 ballots cast by the township's 14,549 registered voters, yielding a 36.3% turnout (vs. 44.5% in the county).[93][94] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 2,879 ballots cast (49.8% vs. 44.5% countywide), ahead of Republican Chris Christie with 2,536 votes (43.9% vs. 47.7%), Independent Chris Daggett with 235 votes (4.1% vs. 4.8%) and other candidates with 99 votes (1.7% vs. 1.2%), among the 5,782 ballots cast by the township's 14,409 registered voters, yielding a 40.1% turnout (vs. 44.9% in the county).[95]

Education[edit]

The Pemberton Township School District serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. The district is one of 31 former Abbott districts statewide,[96] which are now referred to as "SDA Districts" based on the requirement for the state to cover all costs for school building and renovation projects in these districts under the supervision of the New Jersey Schools Development Authority.[97][98] As of the 2013-14 school year, the district's 10 schools had an enrollment of 5,037 students and 442.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.4:1.[99]

Schools in the district (with 2013-14 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[100]) are Pemberton Early Childhood Education Center[101] (Pre-K; 485 students), Samuel T. Busansky Elementary School[102] (3-5; 341), Aletta Crichton Elementary School[103] (3-5; 359), Alexander Denbo Elementary School[104] (combined with Crichton), Howard L. Emmons Elementary School[105] (K-2; 376), Fort Dix Elementary School[106] (PreK-5; 415), Harker-Wylie / Isaiah Haines Elementary School[107] (K-2; 305), Joseph S. Stackhouse Elementary School[108] (3-5; 312), Helen A. Fort / Marcus Newcomb Middle School[109] (6-8; 1,057) and Pemberton Township High School[110] (9-12; 1,027).[111][112]

Students from Pemberton Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.[113]

Pemberton Township is the location of the main campus of Rowan College at Burlington County, formerly known as Burlington County College (BCC), the county's community college, having moved to its first permanent site in Pemberton Township in 1971.[114]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 222.55 miles (358.16 km) of roadways, of which 168.39 miles (271.00 km) were maintained by the municipality, 47.41 miles (76.30 km) by Burlington County and 6.75 miles (10.86 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[115]

The major roads that pass through are CR 530, Route 70 in the south and U.S. Route 206 along the western border. Interstate 295 and the New Jersey Turnpike are outside in neighboring Springfield Township, but the closest interchanges are two towns away.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit provides bus service in the township on the 317 route between Asbury Park and Philadelphia.[116][117]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Pemberton Township include:

Geographic location[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c General Information, Pemberton Township. Accessed January 29, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e f 2010 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey County Subdivisions, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  3. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Office of the Mayor, Pemberton Township. Accessed June 22, 2016.
  5. ^ 2017 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 30, 2017.
  6. ^ Department of Administration, Pemberton Township. Accessed June 22, 2016.
  7. ^ Township Clerk, Pemberton Township. Accessed August 16, 2012.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 43.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Pemberton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Pemberton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 26, 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 5. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Table DP-1. Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Pemberton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed January 26, 2012.
  13. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016 - 2016 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  14. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 7, 2013.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Browns Mills, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 29, 2012.
  16. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Pemberton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed January 29, 2012.
  17. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 29, 2013.
  18. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Browns Mills, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  19. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Pemberton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed November 29, 2013.
  20. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  21. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  22. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  23. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  24. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 205. Accessed January 29, 2012.
  25. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed September 16, 2015.
  26. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Browns Mills CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 28, 2012.
  27. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Country Lake Estates CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 28, 2012.
  28. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Pemberton Heights CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 28, 2012.
  29. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Presidential Lakes Estates CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 28, 2012.
  30. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Fort Dix CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 28, 2012.
  31. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  32. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  33. ^ DeMarco, Megan. "Voters to decide whether to merge two Princetons into one", The Star-Ledger, November 3, 2011. Accessed January 8, 2017. "There are 22 sets of 'doughnut towns' in New Jersey, those where one town wraps around the other town". Note that following voter approval of the Princeton merger, 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" remain.
  34. ^ Areas touching Pemberton Township, MapIt. Accessed December 28, 2014.
  35. ^ The Pinelands National Reserve, New Jersey Pinelands Commission. Accessed November 29, 2013.
  36. ^ Pinelands Municipalities, New Jersey Pinelands Commission, April 2003. Accessed November 29, 2013.
  37. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2016, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2017.
  38. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Burlington County Municipalities, 1800 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  39. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  40. ^ Raum, John O. The History of New Jersey: From Its Earliest Settlement to the Present Time, Volume 1, p. 265, J. E. Potter and company, 1877. Accessed July 29, 2013. "Pemberton township in 1850 had a population of 2,866; in 1860, 2,672; and in 1870, 2,743. The thriving village of Pemberton is in this township and contained a population in 1870 of 797; the celebrated Brown's Mills are also here. There are also the villages called Mary Ann, Ong's Hat, Comical Corner, Hanover, and Birmingham." The 1870 population for Pemberton Township includes the borough's population of 797.
  41. ^ Debow, James Dunwoody Brownson. The Seventh Census of the United States: 1850, p. 137. R. Armstrong, 1853. Accessed July 29, 2013.
  42. ^ Staff. A compendium of the ninth census, 1870, p. 259. United States Census Bureau, 1872. Accessed July 29, 2013. The source shows Pemberton Township's population as 2,743, which includes the 797 for Pemberton Borough.
  43. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  44. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 335. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  45. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed January 29, 2012.
  46. ^ Table 6. New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  47. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Pemberton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  48. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Pemberton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 30, 2012.
  49. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Pemberton township, Burlington County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 29, 2012.
  50. ^ Urban Enterprise Zone Tax Questions and Answers, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, May 2009. Accessed August 23, 2015. "The legislation was amended in 1996 to include seven additional zones. They were all predetermined and include East Orange, Guttenberg, Hillside, Irvington, North Bergen, Pemberton and West New York."
  51. ^ Urban Enterprise Zone (UEZ) Program - Local Zone Support, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed August 23, 2015.
  52. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law", New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed November 29, 2013. Source incorrectly lists Pemberton Borough, which has never had a Faulkner act form.
  53. ^ Local Government: Mayor-Council Plan, Pemberton Township. Accessed November 29, 2013. "Pemberton Township's form of government is the "Mayor- Council Plan" under the Optional Charter Plan, (Faulkner Act), NJSA 40:69A. The Township is governed by an elected Council and an elected Mayor which serve for a term of four years."
  54. ^ Ginburg, Yana. "Suit Pending On Staggered Council Terms It's A Question Of Continuity And Stability. It's Two-year Terms Versus Four.", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 13, 1992. Accessed November 29, 2013. "Democrats are basing their case on the Charter Study Commission Report of 1989, which preceded Pemberton's 1990 change of government from a five-member committee to a mayor-council plan. Voters approved the change in 1989 and elected an all-Republican mayor and five-member council in 1990. The new government officially took effect in January 1991."
  55. ^ Form of Government, Pemberton Township. Accessed June 22, 2016.
  56. ^ DeCastro, Lavinia. "Three ballot questions approved", Courier-Post, November 8, 2006. Accessed November 29, 2013. "In Pemberton Township, voters decided to authorize staggering the terms for township council members. Currently, all five council terms expire at the same time. The ordinance will go into effect at the next general election, conducted in November 2010. The two council members who receive the highest number of votes in that election will serve four-year terms through 2014."
  57. ^ Zimmaro, Mark. "Democrats win complete control of Pemberton Township Council", Burlington County Times, November 7, 2012. Accessed November 29, 2013. "This year's election was slightly different for township voters. Previously, all five council seats and the mayor's seat were on the ballot in the same election year and ran on four-year cycles. That was until the 2010 election, when voters approved a referendum to stagger the terms of the seats, causing three council seats to expire in 2012. Those seats were held by Democrats Sherry Scull and Diane Stinney and Republican Rick Prickett."
  58. ^ Township Council, Pemberton Township. Accessed June 22, 2016.
  59. ^ 2016 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Pemberton Township. Accessed June 22, 2016.
  60. ^ A Guide to Burlington County - 2015, Burlington County, New Jersey. Accessed June 20, 2016.
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