Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Adventure Team

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Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Adventure Team
Pokemon Mystery Dungeon Adventure Team Banner.jpg
Developer(s)Chunsoft
Publisher(s)The Pokémon Company
Director(s)Seiichiro Nagahata
Hironori Ishigami
Producer(s)Koichi Nakamura[1]
SeriesPokémon Mystery Dungeon
Platform(s)Wii
Release
  • JP: 4 August 2009
Genre(s)Roguelike
Mode(s)Single player

The Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Adventure Team series[a] are three role-playing games released for WiiWare, part of the Pokémon Mystery Dungeon series of games. The titles, which were released in Japan on 4 August 2009, are Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Advance! Fire Adventure Team,[b] Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Go! Storm Adventure Team[c] and Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Aim! Light Adventure Team.[d] The games are the only Mystery Dungeon titles to date to be released for a home console and not to be released for the international audience.

As with other installments in the Mystery Dungeon series, the game centers on randomly changing, multilevel dungeons which the player must explore and clear whilst battling hostile Pokémon in turn-based combat. It features separate Pokémon and dungeons between different versions, altogether containing 493 Pokémon of the first four generations of the Pokémon main series games.

Gameplay[edit]

While similar to previous installments such as the Rescue Team and Explorers titles, Adventure Team introduces 3-dimensional graphics instead of the sprite-based graphics of the aforementioned titles.[2] Aside from a difference of starters and the game's hub location (in Fire Adventure Team, red-colored Pokémon such as Charmander are available in the "Pokémon Village", with blue-colored ones such as Squirtle in "Pokémon Beach" and yellow ones such as Pikachu in "Pokémon Garden" being available in Light Adventure Team and Storm Adventure Team, respectively), the three games each contain 15 "Mystery Dungeons" which are unique to each other. Unlike preceding handheld games, Adventure Team games allows 4 save files in a single game. In addition, the player is capable of switching their character at any point in the game to another from a roster of nine Pokémon.[3] Transfer of befriended Pokémon or items between the aforementioned save slots are allowed. The Nintendo DS can also be used as a controller for the game.[4]

The three games collectively features all 493 Pokémon of the fourth generation games, including Arceus which was available through a special distribution.[5] They also enable online features such as the WiiConnect24 and the Nintendo Wi-Fi Connection, through them allowing players to access special challenges and obtain otherwise unavailable Pokémon.[6] The ability to execute "team attacks", where members of the player's team simultaneously attack an enemy Pokémon, were first introduced in Adventure Team, and would feature in later Mystery Dungeon installments. In Adventure Team, the Pokémon do so by stacking on top of each other, forming a "Pokémon Tower".[7] In addition, the game allows player or allied Pokémon to evolve within the dungeons.[8]

Plot[edit]

Unlike previous and following Pokémon Mystery Dungeon games, the player does not act as a human transformed into a Pokémon and are instead Pokémon inhabitants of a town (Pokémon Village, Beach, or Garden depending on the game). After rescuing a Shuckle from a "mystery dungeon" in a tutorial mission with a single partner, the group of nine Pokémon forms an Adventure Team following the request of an elderly Slowking. After some time, in a mission the Pokémon obtain some chocolate which they hand to Shuckle, enticing jealousy across the town. To restore the town, the Adventure Team explore another dungeon and returns with cookies, successfully returning the town to its former peaceful state.

Following the incident, one of the legendary dogs (Raikou, Entei or Suicune) depending on the game approaches the player, offering to join the Adventure Team. Later, they encounter other legendary Pokémon which are available for recruitment into the Rescue Team, in addition to higher-difficulty dungeons.

Release[edit]

Adventure Team installments were first teased through promotional pamphlets in mid-2009, with a website containing gameplay screenshots and footage being opened on July.[2] The games were released on 4 August 2009 in the Wii Shop Channel for 1,200 Nintendo Points.[9][10] The games were given a CERO rating of "A" (for all ages).[11] Kotaku listed the games as one of the best released through the WiiWare.[12]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Adventure Team series (Pokémon Fushigi no Danjon Bōken-dan Shirīzu, ポケモン不思議のダンジョン冒険団シリーズ), alternatively Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Adventure Squad
  2. ^ Officially released as Pokémon Fushigi no Danjon Susume! Honō no Bōken-dan (ポケモン不思議のダンジョン すすめ!炎の冒険団), alternative translation Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Keep Going! Blazing Adventure Squad!
  3. ^ Officially released as Pokémon Fushigi no Danjon Ikuzo! Arashi no Bōken-dan (ポケモン不思議のダンジョン いくぞ!嵐の冒険団), alternative translation Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Let's Go! Stormy Adventure Squad!
  4. ^ Officially released as Pokémon Fushigi no Danjon Mezase! Hikari no Bōken-dan (ポケモン不思議のダンジョン めざせ!光の冒険団), alternative translation Pokémon Mystery Dungeon: Go For It! Light Adventure Squad!

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chunsoft (4 August 2009). ポケモン不思議のダンジョン すすめ!炎の冒険団 (in Japanese). Wii. The Pokémon Company.
  2. ^ a b Gantayat, Anoop (15 July 2009). "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon Hits WiiWare". IGN. Archived from the original on 13 December 2017. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  3. ^ "冒険団シリーズ紹介 | ポケモン不思議のダンジョン 冒険団シリーズ公式サイト | ポケットモンスターオフィシャルサイト". www.pokemon.co.jp (in Japanese). The Pokémon Company. Archived from the original on 29 June 2017. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  4. ^ "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon On Wii Times Three - Siliconera". Siliconera. 29 July 2009. Archived from the original on 6 October 2010. Retrieved 27 December 2017.
  5. ^ "WiiConnect24&ニンテンドーWi-Fiコネクション | ポケモン不思議のダンジョン 冒険団シリーズ公式サイト | ポケットモンスターオフィシャルサイト". www.pokemon.co.jp (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 29 September 2017. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  6. ^ "ポケモンを仲間にしよう! | ポケモン不思議のダンジョン 冒険団シリーズ公式サイト | ポケットモンスターオフィシャルサイト". www.pokemon.co.jp (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 4 February 2017. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  7. ^ Fletcher, J. C. (15 July 2009). "Pokemon Mystery Dungeon for WiiWare: first trailer and details". Engadget. Archived from the original on 15 December 2017. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  8. ^ "Wiiウェア「ポケモン不思議のダンジョン冒険団」で3作品の配信開始&「ポケモン・ルンパ・カーニバル」追加2ゲーム・作戦コードの情報を公開". 4gamer (in Japanese). 4 August 2009. Archived from the original on 15 April 2016.
  9. ^ Fletcher, J.C. (16 June 2009). "Rumor: McDonalds reveals Pokemon Mystery Dungeon on WiiWare". Engadget. Archived from the original on 1 January 2018. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  10. ^ "ポケモン不思議のダンジョン すすめ!炎の冒険団・いくぞ!嵐の冒険団・めざせ!光の冒険団". ポケットモンスターオフィシャルサイト (in Japanese). Archived from the original on 23 November 2017. Retrieved 21 December 2017.
  11. ^ "ポケモン不思議のダンジョン 冒険団シリーズ [Wii]". Famitsu. Archived from the original on 23 July 2015. Retrieved 27 December 2017.
  12. ^ Kohler, Chris (29 November 2017). "The Best WiiWare Games To Buy Before They All Disappear". Kotaku. Archived from the original on 30 November 2017. Retrieved 27 December 2017.

External links[edit]