Talk:Wolf reintroduction

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Larger Wolves?[edit]

I live close to an area where wolves were reintroduced. I have heard opponents of reintroduction claim that the introduced wolves were much larger than the wolves that originally inhabited the area. The majority of the information I have gleaned from the internet indicates that this is not true. Does anyone have a creditable source on this issue? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 66.239.253.2 (talk) 23:10, 12 March 2007 (UTC).

According to Wikipedia, the reintroduced wolves were McKenzie Valley wolves, which might be somewhat larger than the (probably extinct) original subspecies. Wilhelm Ritter 03:08, 5 April 2007 (UTC)
Many subspecies have been extirpated, some of which there are little or no remains or evidence of size; however, folklore often dictates that some of these subspecies may have been larger/smaller than the populations of today. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 171.67.129.45 (talk) 04:57, 19 February 2010 (UTC)

Other Areas[edit]

I've heard the idea mentioned in books about Olympic National Park, but I don't have details. Is there anywhere else in the US it's been/is being considered? Wilhelm Ritter 03:08, 5 April 2007 (UTC)

Wolves Versus Livestock[edit]

I am highly involved in agriculture and I wanted to provide anyone interested with a great resource regarding wolf reintroduction. If you go to pbs.org and search Wolves in Paradise, there is an extrememly interesting documented research project about wolves interaction with cattle. It gives research backed proof that wolves are detremental to ranching operations, but that they are also needed in a balanced ecosystem. Its a facinating film, you should watch it. October 13, 2009 9:57pm —Preceding unsigned comment added by 98.232.184.175 (talk) 04:59, 14 October 2009 (UTC)

This article also lacks mentioning the techniques to keep wolf packs away from livestock using social behavior elements of the predators. I saw (on TV) very promissing experiments with recordings of teritory-defense chants to make neighboring packs think the ranch is already under control of a pack. People involved in those experiments argued it worked very well. I tried to find the source back but I failed. I remember part of it took place in Northern Europe. Anybody knows where to find it? Correjon (talk) 13:57, 5 February 2010 (UTC)
Additionally, there is evidence that sport hunting causes irreparable imbalances in wolf packs, leading to "lone wolf" phenomena which are more detrimental to livestock than a cohesive pack. In fact, the most significant spikes in livestock predation have occurred after large-scale hunts. I hope that somebody (I will do it if nobody else does) can demonstrate this important fact in this article, perhaps even under a "controversy" section, if necessary. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 171.67.129.45 (talk) 04:52, 19 February 2010 (UTC)

Scandanavia Section[edit]

The last paragraph of the Scandanavia section is completely without citation or evidence. I tried to take out the whole paragraph, since it reads like a single, biased person's speculation about wolves, but an admin restored it. I hope that this section can be removed or substantiated with evidence (and provide counter-evidence), so as not to mislead readers into adopting an opinion as fact about wolf reintroduction. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Sanzoneja (talkcontribs) 12:30, 25 December 2009 (UTC)

I feel that this section requires intense revision. Even if the claims are true, there is an overt bias present. It is rife with unfounded opinions, many of which lean toward political activism. Still yet, there is a glaring lack of a professional tone. Sother (talk) 05:08, 19 February 2010 (UTC)

Wyoming?[edit]

I don't think this article needs to be under Wyoming, it is certainly an international issue, and within the United States stretches beyond Wyoming, for sure. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 171.67.129.45 (talk) 04:53, 19 February 2010 (UTC)

Newfoundland[edit]

Should we add anything about re-introducing wolves to Newfoundland? Thylacinus cynocephalus (talk) 00:02, 19 December 2010 (UTC)

Red wolves?[edit]

The article only mentions the (cancelled) reintroduction attempt in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park; however the Red Wolf article also covers the (ongoing) reintroduction into the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in the same state. It seems odd to me to talk about the failed attempt but not the successful one; should info about the latter be copied here from the Red Wolf article? 141.211.198.115 (talk) 15:26, 4 December 2012 (UTC)

There's surely plenty of things this article is missing, so feel free to add whatever reliable secondary sources and material you find. I see above some sections complaining about the lack of international focus, and I recommend that its always fine to add whatever material one wishes that is relevant to the scope of the article and which is backed by reliable secondary sources.MONGO 16:12, 4 December 2012 (UTC)

A myth?[edit]

See "Is the Wolf a Real American Hero?" opinion in The New York Times by Arthur Middleton March 9, 2014 User:Fred Bauder Talk 09:02, 10 March 2014 (UTC)

"This story — that wolves fixed a broken Yellowstone by killing and frightening elk — is one of ecology’s most famous. It’s the classic example of what’s called a “trophic cascade,” and has appeared in textbooks, on National Geographic centerfolds and in this newspaper. Americans may know this story better than any other from ecology, and its grip on our imagination is one of the field’s proudest contributions to wildlife conservation. But there is a problem with the story: It’s not true." User:Fred Bauder Talk 09:02, 10 March 2014 (UTC)