V-Ray

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V-Ray
V-Ray logo
Glass ochem dof2.png
Render created using V-Ray for Rhinoceros 3D, demonstrating the advanced effects V-Ray is capable of, such as refraction and caustics.
Developer(s) Chaos Group
Stable release
3.40.03 / August 30, 2016; 2 months ago (2016-08-30)
Operating system Linux, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows
Type Rendering system
License Proprietary commercial software
Website www.chaosgroup.com
Folded paper: SketchUp drawing rendered using V-Ray, demonstrating shading and global illumination
Render created using V-Ray for Rhinoceros 3D, demonstrating the advanced effects V-Ray is capable of, such as reflection, depth of field, and the shape of the aperture (in this case, a hexagon)

V-Ray is a commercial rendering plug-in for 3D computer graphics software applications. It is developed by Chaos Group (Bulgarian: Хаос Груп), a Bulgarian company based in Sofia, Bulgaria, established in 1997. V-Ray is used in media, entertainment, and design industries such as film and video game production, industrial design, product design and architecture.[1] The company chief architects are Peter Mitev and Vladimir Koylazov.

Overview[edit]

V-Ray is a rendering engine that uses global illumination algorithms, including path tracing, photon mapping, irradiance maps and directly computed global illumination.

The desktop 3D applications that are supported by V-Ray are:

Academic and stand-alone versions of V-Ray are also available.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Francesco Legrenzi, V-Ray - The Complete Guide, 2008
  • Markus Kuhlo and Enrico Eggert, Architectural Rendering with 3ds Max and V-Ray: Photorealistic Visualization, Focal Press, 2010
  • Ciro Sannino, Photography and Rendering with V-Ray, GC Edizioni, 2012
  • Luca Deriu, V-Ray e Progettazione 3D, EPC Editore, 2013

External links[edit]