Wharton, New Jersey

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Wharton, New Jersey
Borough of Wharton
Memorial Park in central Wharton
Memorial Park in central Wharton
Motto(s): 
Tradition with Progress!
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Wharton, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Wharton, New Jersey
Coordinates: 40°53′49″N 74°34′28″W / 40.897055°N 74.574512°W / 40.897055; -74.574512Coordinates: 40°53′49″N 74°34′28″W / 40.897055°N 74.574512°W / 40.897055; -74.574512[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
IncorporatedJune 26, 1895 as Port Oram
RenamedApril 16, 1902 as Wharton
Named forJoseph Wharton
Government
 • TypeBorough
 • BodyBorough Council
 • MayorWilliam J. Chegwidden (R, term ends December 31, 2022)[3][4]
 • Municipal clerkGabrielle Evangelista[5]
Area
 • Total2.13 sq mi (5.51 km2)
 • Land2.07 sq mi (5.37 km2)
 • Water0.06 sq mi (0.14 km2)  2.63%
Area rank399th of 565 in state
33rd of 39 in county[1]
Elevation666 ft (203 m)
Population
 • Total6,522
 • Estimate 
(2019)[11]
6,369
 • Rank327th of 566 in state
26th of 39 in county[12]
 • Density3,039.0/sq mi (1,173.4/km2)
 • Density rank213th of 566 in state
10th of 39 in county[12]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
Area code(s)973[15]
FIPS code3402780390[1][16][17]
GNIS feature ID0885443[1][18]
Websitewww.whartonnj.com

Wharton is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States.

Wharton was originally incorporated as the borough Port Oram by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on June 26, 1895, created from portions of Randolph Township and Rockaway Township, subject to the results of a referendum passed on the previous day; the name was changed to Wharton on April 16, 1902, based on a referendum held that day and subject to legislation passed on March 27, 1902.[19][20][21] The borough was named for Joseph Wharton of the Wharton Steel Company.[22][23]

As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,522,[8][9][10] reflecting an increase of 224 (+3.6%) from the 6,298 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 893 (+16.5%) from the 5,405 counted in the 1990 Census.[24]

History[edit]

In 1831, the Morris Canal was completed from Newark to Phillipsburg, New Jersey across the Delaware River from the terminus of the Lehigh Canal. On the way, it passed through Boonton, Dover and Port Oram. On this route it tapped the Morris County ore fields and became a carrier for both ore and pig iron. Its main purpose, however, was as an extension of the Lehigh Canal to furnish a route for anthracite coal from the Pennsylvania mines to seaboard. Any local traffic was a gain to supplement the through anthracite freight and iron ore and its products soon became important sources of revenue. Sites on the canal were selected for docks and industry, including iron works.[25]

On June 28, 1895, voters from the settlements Port Oram, Irondale, Luxemburg, Maryville and Mount Pleasant voted 143 to 51 to incorporate as the borough Port Oram, the largest of the communities in the area covering 2.25 square miles (5.8 km2) west of Dover, New Jersey. A mayor, six councilmen, an assessor and a collector were elected to govern the new borough which had started life as an ore shipping port on the Morris Canal. These elected officials (mine superintendents, store owners, a railroad superintendent and a school teacher) represented the leaders of these settlements where iron ore was mined, smelted and shipped.[25]

The borough was renamed in 1902 in honor of Joseph Wharton, who was born in 1826 in Philadelphia to an old family of Quakers. Wharton first studied at a local Quaker school after which he worked on a farm rather than attend college because his parents wanted him to mature,[26] and during the winter studied chemistry at the laboratory of Martin Hans Boyè in Philadelphia. He started producing zinc and nickel, and gradually bought a controlling interest in Bethlehem Iron Works. As his business interests expanded he purchased substantial shares of several railroads involved in the coal and iron trade, also purchasing iron mines and furnaces near Port Oram. After selling his interest in Bethlehem Iron Works in 1901 and his nickel works to CVRD Inco in 1902, he continued to actively acquire and manage a large and diverse business empire that included iron smelting in Wharton until just before his death in January, 1909. Wharton also endowed the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. The town was named after him at after a referendum in 1902.[25]

In 1984, the long-time local bar The Heslin House and Hartley's Store were destroyed in a gas leak explosion, in which flames as high as 100 feet (30 m) destroyed several area buildings.[27]

Wharton was used as a filming location for Cyndi Lauper's music video "Time After Time" in 1984.[28]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.13 square miles (5.51 km2), including 2.07 square miles (5.37 km2) of land and 0.06 square miles (0.14 km2) of water (2.63%).[1][2]

The borough borders the Morris County municipalities of Dover, Jefferson Township, Mine Hill Township, Rockaway Township, Roxbury Township.[29][30][31]

Unincorporated communities in the borough include Irondale, Luxemburg, Maryville, Mount Pleasant and Port Oram.[21]

Climate[edit]

The climate in this area is characterized by hot, humid summers and generally mild to cool winters. According to the Köppen Climate Classification system, Wharton has a humid subtropical climate, abbreviated "Cfa" on climate maps.[32]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890775
19002,069167.0%
19102,98344.2%
19202,877−3.6%
19303,68328.0%
19403,8544.6%
19503,8530.0%
19605,00629.9%
19705,53510.6%
19805,485−0.9%
19905,405−1.5%
20006,29816.5%
20106,5223.6%
2019 (est.)6,369[11][33][34]−2.3%
Population sources:
1890[35] 1900-1920[36]
1900-1910[37] 1910-1930[38]
1930-1990[39] 2000[40][41] 2010[8][9][10]

2010 Census[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 6,522 people, 2,304 households, and 1,590 families in the borough. The population density was 3,039.0 per square mile (1,173.4/km2). There were 2,426 housing units at an average density of 1,130.4 per square mile (436.4/km2). The racial makeup was 75.85% (4,947) White, 4.57% (298) Black or African American, 0.18% (12) Native American, 5.67% (370) Asian, 0.06% (4) Pacific Islander, 9.61% (627) from other races, and 4.05% (264) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 40.33% (2,630) of the population.[8]

Of the 2,304 households, 33.5% had children under the age of 18; 48.1% were married couples living together; 14.8% had a female householder with no husband present and 31.0% were non-families. Of all households, 25.0% were made up of individuals and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.83 and the average family size was 3.34.[8]

23.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.2 years. For every 100 females, the population had 96.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 92.7 males.[8] The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $73,571 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,504) and the median family income was $75,176 (+/- $9,601). Males had a median income of $48,750 (+/- $12,951) versus $31,105 (+/- $5,994) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,233 (+/- $2,723). About 6.6% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.6% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.[42]

2000 Census[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[16] there were 6,298 people, 2,328 households, and 1,599 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,882.4 people per square mile (1,110.4/km2). There were 2,394 housing units at an average density of 1,095.6 per square mile (422.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 82.09% White, 4.40% African American, 0.44% Native American, 3.14% Asian, 7.21% from other races, and 2.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 23.21% of the population.[40][41]

There were 2,328 households, out of which 34.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.1% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 31.3% were non-families. 26.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.28.[40][41]

In the borough the population age was spread out, with 26.0% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 34.0% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.8 males.[40][41]

The median income for a household in the borough was $56,580, and the median income for a family was $64,957. Males had a median income of $42,311 versus $36,016 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,168. About 6.4% of families and 8.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.0% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.[40][41]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Wharton is governed under the Borough form of New Jersey municipal government, which is used in 218 municipalities (of the 565) statewide, making it the most common form of government in New Jersey.[43] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the Borough Council, with all positions elected at-large on a partisan basis as part of the November general election. The Mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council is comprised of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year in a three-year cycle.[6] The Borough form of government used by Wharton is a "weak mayor / strong council" government in which council members act as the legislative body with the mayor presiding at meetings and voting only in the event of a tie. The mayor can veto ordinances subject to an override by a two-thirds majority vote of the council. The mayor makes committee and liaison assignments for council members, and most appointments are made by the mayor with the advice and consent of the council.[44][45]

As of 2020, the Mayor of Wharton is Republican Bill Chegwidden, whose term of office ends December 31, 2022. Members of the Borough Council are Council President Vincent Binkoski (R, 2020), Sandra L. Hayes (R, 2020), Robert Norton (R, 2022), Paola Vasquez (R, 2022), Thomas C. Yeager (R, 2021) and Nicole Wickenheisser (R, 2021).[3][46][47][48][49][50][51]

Dover serves as the lead agency operating a joint municipal court that includes Wharton and the neighboring municipalities of Mine Hill Township, Mount Arlington and Victory Gardens.[52] Established in 2009, the joint municipal court was forecast to offer annual savings in excess of $250,000 over the 10-year life of the agreement.[53]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Wharton is located in the 7th Congressional District[54] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[9][55][56] Prior to the 2010 Census, Wharton had been part of the 11th Congressional District, a change made by the New Jersey Redistricting Commission that took effect in January 2013, based on the results of the November 2012 general elections.[57]

For the 117th United States Congress. New Jersey's Seventh Congressional District is represented by Tom Malinowski (D, East Amwell Township).[58] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[59] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[60][61]

For the 2020–2021 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 25th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Tony Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and in the General Assembly by Brian Bergen (R, Denville) and Aura K. Dunn (R, Mendham Borough).[62][63]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of County Commissioners, who are elected at-large in partisan elections, to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either one or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Commissioner Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[64] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[65] As of 2021, Morris County's Commissioners are Commissioner Director Stephen H. Shaw (R, Mountain Lakes, 2021),[66] Commissioner Deputy Director Deborah Smith (R, Denville, 2021),[67] John Krickus (R, Washington Township, 2021),[68] Douglas Cabana (R, Boonton Township, 2022),[69] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (R, Roxbury, 2022),[70] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (R, Montville, 2022),[71] and Tayfun Selen (R, Chatham Township, 2023).[72] [73]

Tayfun Selen was elected by a county Republican convention to the vacant seat of Heather Darling, who was elected Morris County Surrogate in 2019.[74] He served the remainder of her term which ended in 2020 and was elected to a full three-year term in the November general election that year.[75]

Pursuant to Article VII Section II of the New Jersey State Constitution, each county in New Jersey is required to have three elected administrative officials known as "constitutional officers." These officers are the County Clerk and County Surrogate (both elected for five-year terms of office) and the County Sheriff (elected for a three-year term).[76] As of 2021, they are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (R, Parsippany, 2023),[77] Sheriff James M. Gannon (R, Boonton Township, 2022)[78] and Surrogate Heather Darling (R, Roxbury, 2024).[79]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, Wharton had a total of 3,258 registered voters, of which 923 (28.3%) were registered as Democrats, 935 (28.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,397 (42.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. Three voters were registered to other parties.[80]

In the 2012 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 56.0% of the vote (1,310 cast), ahead of Republican Mitt Romney with 43.0% (1,006 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (24 votes), among the 2,359 ballots cast by the borough's 3,455 registered voters (19 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 68.3%.[81][82] In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 51.8% of the vote (1,326 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain with 47.0% (1,202 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (19 votes), among the 2,559 ballots cast by the borough's 3,432 registered voters, for a turnout of 74.6%.[83] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 54.4% of the vote (1,334 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 44.6% (1,092 votes) and other candidates with 0.5% (16 votes), among the 2,451 ballots cast by the borough's 3,510 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 69.8.[84]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 65.9% of the vote (892 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 32.1% (434 votes), and other candidates with 2.0% (27 votes), among the 1,381 ballots cast by the borough's 3,449 registered voters (28 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 40.0%.[85][86] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 52.9% of the vote (848 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 36.6% (586 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.6% (137 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (17 votes), among the 1,602 ballots cast by the borough's 3,357 registered voters, yielding a 47.7% turnout.[87]

Education[edit]

The Wharton Borough School District serves public school students in kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of two schools, had an enrollment of 738 students and 73.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.0:1.[88] Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[89]) are Marie V. Duffy Elementary School[90] with 462 students in grades K - 5 and Alfred C. MacKinnon Middle School[91] with 271 students in grades 6 - 8.[92]

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Morris Hills High School, located in Rockaway Borough, and which also serves portions of Rockaway Borough and Rockaway Township.[93] As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,279 students and 118.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.8:1.[94] The high school is part of the Morris Hills Regional High School District, which also includes students from Denville Township, who attend Morris Knolls High School along with students from parts of Rockaway Borough and Rockaway Township.[95][96]

Parks and recreation[edit]

Hugh Force Canal Park

The Hugh Force Canal Park provides hiking trails along the former Morris Canal and abandoned railroad beds. It features Lock 2 East of the canal.[97]

Transportation[edit]

I-80 eastbound at Route 15 in Wharton

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 22.12 miles (35.60 km) of roadways, of which 16.67 miles (26.83 km) were maintained by the municipality, 3.31 miles (5.33 km) by Morris County and 2.14 miles (3.44 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[98]

Interstate 80 and New Jersey Route 15 are the main highways serving Wharton. I-80 travels east–west, while Route 15 is oriented north–south.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit offers local bus service on the 880 route,[99] which largely replaced the previous MCM10 route.[100][101]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Wharton include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b Governing Body, Borough of Wharton. Accessed March 12, 2020.
  4. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  5. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Wharton. Accessed March 12, 2020.
  6. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 116.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Wharton, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 14, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Wharton borough, Morris County, New Jersey Archived February 12, 2020, at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 16, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
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  11. ^ a b QuickFacts for Wharton borough, New Jersey; Morris County, New Jersey; New Jersey from Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019), United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
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  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Wharton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed May 16, 2012.
  14. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 1, 2013.
  15. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Wharton, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 1, 2013.
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  20. ^ Honeyman, Abraham Van Doren. Index-analysis of the Statutes of New Jersey, 1896-1909: Together with References to All Acts, and Parts of Acts, in the 'General Statutes' and Pamphlet Laws Expressly Repealed: and the Statutory Crimes of New Jersey During the Same Period, p. 210. New Jersey Law Journal Publishing Company, 1910. Accessed September 21, 2015.
  21. ^ a b Historical Timeline of Morris County Boundaries, Morris County Library. Accessed December 24, 2016. "1895, June 28. Port Oram is established from Roxbury. The community is made up of the settlements of Port Oram, Irondale, Luxemburg, Maryville and Mount Pleasant. The name is changed to Wharton Borough in 1902."
  22. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed October 29, 2015.
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  27. ^ Armental, Maria. "New state rules burn firefighters: Deployment limits could slow response times, officials say", Daily Record (Morristown), January 24, 2004. Accessed May 16, 2012. "Wharton suffered one of the county's largest fires in 1984, when a gas explosion shot flames 100 feet in the air, destroyed several downtown buildings and damaged more than a dozen others."
  28. ^ Staff. "Banner Year For N.J. Film Industry Production Companies Spent $15.4 Million In '84", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 3, 1985. Accessed May 16, 2012. "Lauper's hit 'Time After Time' was shot in Morristown, Ledgewood and Wharton."
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  32. ^ Climate Summary for Wharton, New Jersey
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  67. ^ Deborah Smith, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  68. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  69. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021).
  70. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  71. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  72. ^ Tayfun Selen, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  73. ^ Commissioners, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed January 15, 2021.
  74. ^ Filler, Marion. "Morris County's next freeholder is…Tayfun Selen". Morristown Green. Retrieved May 12, 2020.
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  77. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed April 16, 2019.
  78. ^ About Us: Sheriff James M. Gannon, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed April 16, 2019.
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  100. ^ Morris County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed December 23, 2012.
  101. ^ NJ TRANSIT RESTRUCTURES MORRIS COUNTY BUS SERVICE; Four current 'MCM' routes will be expanded to six new bus routes, NJ Transit, September 13, 2010. Accessed August 6, 2015.
  102. ^ Wharton's Own Superman: Kirk Alyn, Borough of Wharton. Accessed February 27, 2008.

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