1800 in New Zealand

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1800 in New Zealand
Decades:

The only recorded ship visit is a 3 day visit to Hauraki (the Waihou River between the Hauraki Plains and Coromandel Peninsula) to collect timber. It is possible that sealers visit Dusky Sound and that whalers are off the north-east coast but no specific records of any such activity remains.[1]

Incumbents[edit]

Regal and viceregal[2][edit]

Events[edit]

Undated

Births[edit]

approximate
  • c.1800 (in England): John Guard, whaler and trader, first permanent European resident in the South Island.[9]

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Salmond, Anne. Between Worlds. 1997. Penguin Books (NZ) Ltd. ISBN 0-670-87787-5.
  2. ^ The colony of New South Wales encompasses New Zealand from 1788 to 1840. Therefore the head of state is the monarch of the United Kingdom represented by the Governor of New South Wales. However, British sovereignty was not established over New Zealand per se until 1840, at which point the Treaty of Waitangi retroactively recognised that it had been an independent territory until then. Furthermore, the Declaration of the Independence of New Zealand signed by a number of Maori chiefs in 1835 was formally recognised by the British government at the time, indicating that British sovereignty did not yet extend to New Zealand. (New Zealand Ministry of Culture and Heritage)
  3. ^ Dictionary of Australian Biography: Philip Gidley King
  4. ^ Dictionary of Australian Biography: John Hunter
  5. ^ New Zealand Encyclopaedia 1966: Samuel Marsden Biography
  6. ^ Dictionary of New Zealand Biography: Samuel Marsden
  7. ^ 'Williams, William', from An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, originally published in 1966. Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand, updated 18-September–2007 url
  8. ^ DNZB: James Reddy Clendon
  9. ^ Foster, Bernard J. (18 September 2007). "GUARD, John, from An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand, edited by A. H. McLintock, originally published in 1966.". Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand.