1869 in New Zealand

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Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand.svg '1869 in New Zealand': Flag of New Zealand.svg
Other years in New Zealand
1866 | 1867 | 1868 | 1869 | 1870 | 1871 | 1872

Incumbents[edit]

Regal and viceregal[edit]

Government and law[edit]

The 4th Parliament continues.

Main centre leaders[edit]

Events[edit]

Flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand
The New Zealand Ensign for use on Government ships
  • 4–5 January: Te Kooti and his followers manage to escape the siege of Ngā Tapa pā.[1][2]
  • 13 February: A war party of Ngāti Maniapoto led by Wetere Te Rerenga kills all three men, a woman and three children, and also the Wesleyan missionary John Whiteley who arrives shortly afterwards, at the isolated Pukearuhe Redoubt. This is the final act of the Taranaki wars.[3]
  • August: The first bicycle built in Auckland is ridden for the first time. Bicycles are also built and ridden in Christchurch and Dunedin in this year.[4]

Undated[edit]

  • The New Zealand Ensign is introduced for use on government ships. It does not become the official national flag until 1902. The flag of the United Tribes of New Zealand is also in common use.
  • Resignation and departure from New Zealand of Jean Baptiste Pompallier, First Catholic Bishop in New Zealand.
  • Closure of St Mary's Seminary, Auckland.

Incumbencies[edit]

Catholic church[edit]

Church of England[edit]

Sport[edit]

Horse racing[edit]

Major race winners[edit]

  • New Zealand Cup winner: Mainsail
  • New Zealand Derby winner: Manuka

Shooting[edit]

Ballinger Belt: No competition

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

General
  • Romanos, J. (2001) New Zealand Sporting Records and Lists. Auckland: Hodder Moa Beckett. ISBN 1-86958-879-7
Specific
  1. ^ Today in History | NZHistory
  2. ^ Dictionary Of New Zealand Biography: Te Kooti
  3. ^ "Murder at Pukearuhe". New Plymouth District Council. Retrieved 18 June 2014. 
  4. ^ New Zealand Cycling History
  5. ^ Although consecrated Jenner was never enthroned and is not considered to be the first Bishop of Dunedin.

External links[edit]

Media related to 1869 in New Zealand at Wikimedia Commons