Amiibo

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Amiibo
Amiibo.svg
The Amiibo logo
International standard Near field communication
Developed by Nintendo
Introduced June 10, 2014 (2014-06-10)
Industry Video game
Connector type Wireless
Compatible hardware
Physical range < 20 cm (7.9 in)

Amiibo (Japanese: アミーボ Hepburn: Amībo?, stylized as amiibo) is Nintendo's wireless communications and storage protocol, for use between compatible toys and the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U gaming platforms. It was launched in November 2014 in the form of system software updates and a series of Amiibo-enabled figurines, colloquially abbreviated as "amiibo figurines" or simply "amiibo". These figurines are similar in form and functionality to that of the Skylanders, Disney Infinity, and Telepods series. The platform was preannounced to potentially accommodate any form of toy, specifically including general plans for future card games.[1][2] These toys use near field communication (NFC) to interact with supported video game software, potentially allowing data to be transferred in and out of games and across multiple platforms.

Amiibo toys can be used directly with the Wii U GamePad and New Nintendo 3DS series,[3] with an adapter for the rest of the Nintendo 3DS series to be released in 2015 along with the Nintendo 3DS game Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer.[4] As of December 31, 2014, Nintendo has sold 5.7 million Amiibo toys.[5]

History[edit]

Development[edit]

Pre-release promotional image showing a group of Amiibo figures for Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U.

Toys for Bob and its parent company Activision had offered an opportunity for Nintendo to be a partner in a new video game franchise known as Skylanders, which would use RFID-equipped character figurines and a special reader component to interact with the game itself, and could store data on the figurine itself such as the corresponding character's statistics. While Nintendo passed on the exclusivity deal, the franchise itself quickly became one of Activison's most successful franchises upon its launch as a spin-off of the Spyro the Dragon series, and also resulted in competition from Disney Interactive Studios, who would release a game with a similar concept known as Disney Infinity in 2013.[6][7]

In March 2013, long predating Amiibo, Nintendo unveiled Pokémon Rumble U, the first game for the Wii U to utilize the Wii U GamePad's near-field communications support to enable the use of its own interactive figurines.[8] During an investors' meeting in May 2014, Nintendo presented a prototype of a more comprehensive figurine platform for its 3DS and Wii U consoles, which was designed so that the figurines could be used across multiple games. The new system was codenamed NFP, standing for either "Nintendo Figurine Platform" or "NFC Featured Platform", and was slated to be officially unveiled during E3.[9] On June 10, 2014 during its E3 presentation, Nintendo officially announced Amiibo, and that Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U would be among the first games to provide features integrating with Amiibo figures.[10]

In a corporate policy event after the launch of the Amiibo platform, Nintendo designer Shigeru Miyamoto addressed the platform's future by stating that the company is "now moving forward with projects that make use of NFC in a variety of unique ways. Nintendo is known as a video game company, but in fact, it is also a toy company."[1][2]

Release[edit]

The first wave of Super Smash Bros. Amiibo compatible figurines were released in North America on November 21, 2014 and in Europe on November 28, 2014, along with the release of Super Smash Bros. for Wii U.[11][12][12] The first and second waves were released with the launch of Super Smash Bros. Wii U on December 6, 2014 in Japan. Wave 2 later arrived on December 14, 2014 in North America. Wave 3 arrived on January 22, 2015 in Japan and February 1, 2015 in North America. Wave 4 is scheduled to arrive in April 2015 for Japan and May 29, 2015 for North America. The Super Mario series, featuring Mario, Luigi, Peach, Yoshi, Bowser, and Toad, arrived on March 20, 2015 for both regions.[13]

A post-launch software update for the New Nintendo 3DS released in December 2014 adds the ability to scan, recognize, and erase data from Amiibo toys from the System Settings menu.[14] An NFC Reader for older Nintendo 3DS systems will be released in the summer in the U.S.[15]

In 2015, Nintendo began to extend the Amiibo line into new form factors; on February 27, 2015, Nintendo CEO Satoru Iwata revealed that the company had plans to release Amiibo-enabled trading cards. On April 1, 2015, Nintendo unveiled Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer, a spin-off in the Animal Crossing series that will utilize Amiibo cards. Nintendo also unveiled Amiibo yarn plushies as a tie-in for Yoshi's Wooly World.[16][17][18]

Supported games[edit]

Supported games offer one of two kinds of Amiibo compatibility; the ability to access an Amiibo toy's NFC tag and store data, and read-only recognition. Each Amiibo toy largely corresponds to a specific game that can access its storage space, though some may have multiple games that can use it. However, each Amiibo toy can only store data from one compatible game at a time, meaning data must be deleted from the toy in order to use it with a different title. For example, the Mario figurines from both the Super Smash Bros. and Super Mario series are compatible with both Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U and Mario Party 10, but can only hold data for one of these titles.[19] Many games offer compatibility with specific toys on a read-only basis, allowing for additional content to be unlocked in that game. For example, using certain figurines with Mario Kart 8 unlocks costumes based on the corresponding figurine.[20] Existing Wii U and 3DS games can receive updates that enable them to recognize Amiibo toys.[21] Due to their co-development effort on Super Smash Bros. for Nintendo 3DS/Wii U, Bandai Namco Games are the first third-party publishers to embrace the Amiibo concept in some of their own games.[22]

Super Smash Bros. Amiibo figures can be used in Super Smash Bros. for Wii U to spawn computer-controlled characters to fight either alongside a player-controlled character, or against other CPU, player-controlled, or Amiibo-generated characters. With continued use, the Amiibo's corresponding character is able to level up and learn new abilities.[7][23] Super Mario series figurines, as well as their Smash Bros. counterparts, can be used in Mario Party 10 to store items that can be brought into the game.

Wii U[edit]

Nintendo 3DS[edit]

List of Amiibo-branded NFC items[edit]

The following list features all known NFC items branded under Amiibo, all produced in the form of plastic character figurines as of May 2015, but will later appear in other forms, such as soft toys and cards. Nintendo designed all Amiibo characters to be cross-compatible with all games that support specific Amiibo characters, regardless of whichever model line these characters belong to; for example, Mario figurines from both the Super Smash Bros. and Super Mario series have the same functionality. According to Shinya Takahashi of Nintendo's SPD division, the Super Smash Bros. line, being released in waves since November 21, 2014, is planned to cumulatively feature at least 50 Amiibo models, one for each of the game's playable characters.[33] The Super Mario line was released on March 20, 2015 along with Mario Party 10, featuring 6 Amiibo models. In the April 2015 Nintendo Direct presentation, it was revealed that, in addition to Super Smash Bros. DLC characters having their own Amiibo figurines, Splatoon and Yoshi's Woolly World will come with their own lines, in which the latter's line will be soft dolls instead of hard plastic figures. The same Direct also revealed the upcoming Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer will support Amiibo-branded NFC cards rather than figures at all.


Amiibo and games with assorted/universal support
Character Amiibo series[34] Super Smash Bros.
for Nintendo 3DS and Wii U
Mario Kart 8 Hyrule Warriors Captain Toad:
Treasure Tracker
Mario Party 10 Ace Combat:
Assault Horizon Legacy +
One Piece:
Super Grand Battle! X
Girls Mode 3: Kira Kira Code
Donkey Kong Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only
Fox Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only
Kirby Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only Read Only
Link Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only
Mario Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only
Marth Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only Read Only
Peach Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only No Read Only
Pikachu Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Samus Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only
Villager Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Wii Fit Trainer Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only Read Only
Yoshi Super Smash Bros. (Wave 1) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes No Read Only Read Only
Captain Falcon Super Smash Bros. (Wave 2) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only
Diddy Kong Super Smash Bros. (Wave 2) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Little Mac Super Smash Bros. (Wave 2) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Luigi Super Smash Bros. (Wave 2) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only
Pit Super Smash Bros. (Wave 2) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Zelda Super Smash Bros. (Wave 2) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only
Bowser Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only No Read Only
Ike Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
King Dedede Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Lucario Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Mega Man Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Meta Knight Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Rosalina and Luma Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes No No Read Only
Sheik Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only
Shulk Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Sonic Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Toon Link Super Smash Bros. (Wave 3) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only
Bowser Super Mario Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only No Read Only
Luigi Super Mario Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only
Mario[a] Super Mario Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only
Peach Super Mario Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only No Read Only
Toad Super Mario No Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes No No Read Only
Yoshi Super Mario Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes No Read Only Read Only
Charizard Super Smash Bros. (Wave 4) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Greninja Super Smash Bros. (Wave 4) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Jigglypuff Super Smash Bros. (Wave 4) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Lucina Super Smash Bros. (Wave 4) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Ness Super Smash Bros. (Wave 4) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Pac-Man Super Smash Bros. (Wave 4) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only
Robin Super Smash Bros. (Wave 4) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Wario Super Smash Bros. (Wave 4) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes No No Read Only
Inkling Boy Splatoon No No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Inkling Girl Splatoon No No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Inkling Squid Splatoon No No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Bowser Jr. Super Smash Bros. (Wave 5) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Dark Pit Super Smash Bros. (Wave 5) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Dr. Mario Super Smash Bros. (Wave 5) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes Read Only No Read Only
Ganondorf Super Smash Bros. (Wave 5) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Palutena Super Smash Bros. (Wave 5) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only No No Read Only
Pikmin & Olimar Super Smash Bros. (Wave 5) Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only
Zero Suit Samus Super Smash Bros. (Wave 5) Yes No Read Only Read Only Read Only Read Only No Read Only
Yarn Yoshi[b] Yoshi's Woolly World Yes Read Only Read Only Read Only Yes No No Read Only
Lucas Super Smash Bros. (Wave TBD) Yes ? Read Only Read Only Read Only ? ? Read Only
Mewtwo Super Smash Bros. (Wave TBD) Yes ? Read Only Read Only Read Only ? ? Read Only
Games with series specific Amiibo support
Supported game Compatible Amiibo (read only) Series
Animal Crossing: Happy Home Designer
  • Goose
  • Isabelle
  • Peanut
  • Snake[35]
  • Tom Nook[36]
Animal Crossing
Unconfirmed[c]
Code Name: S.T.E.A.M.
  • Ike
  • Lucina
  • Marth
  • Robin
Fire Emblem
Kirby and the Rainbow Curse
  • King Dedede
  • Kirby
  • Meta Knight
Kirby
Splatoon
  • Inkling Boy
  • Inkling Girl
  • Inkling Squid
Splatoon
Star Fox
  • Fox
Star Fox
Yoshi's Woolly World
  • Yarn Yoshi
Yoshi
Xenoblade Chronicles 3D
  • Shulk
Xenoblade Chronicles
  1. ^ Exclusively available in the Mario Party 10 + Mario amiibo bundle at launch. Also available in Gold edition, which was only released in North America.
  2. ^ Available in green, light blue and pink. Unlike other Amiibo, these are made of actual yarn.
  3. ^ The Amiibo card for these characters have not officially been confirmed yet.

Exclusives[edit]

In North America, some Amiibo are only available in selected retailers.[42]

Retailer Exclusive Amiibo in North America
Exclusive Amiibo U.S. Retailer Canadian Retailer
Lucario
Meta Knight
Shulk
Rosalina
  • Not exclusive
Mario (Gold Edition)
  • Not exclusive
Ness
Jigglypuff TBA
Greninja

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b McWhertor, Michael (November 6, 2014). "The future of Nintendo's amiibo includes card games, smaller toys, Animal Crossing". Polygon. Retrieved December 16, 2014. 
  2. ^ a b "Corporate Management Policy Briefing / Semi-Annual Financial Results Briefing for the 75th Fiscal Term Ending March 2015". Nintendo. Retrieved December 16, 2014. 
  3. ^ "With New 3DS Model, Nintendo Continues to Woo Hardcore Gamers". Wired.com. Retrieved October 27, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Super Smash Bros. Wii U and Amiibo release dates announced". Eurogamer. Retrieved October 27, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Report: Nintendo Announces 5.7 Million Amiibo Figures Shipped". www.GameInformer.com. Retrieved January 31, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Toys for Bob and the story behind Skylanders". Polygon. Retrieved October 27, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b "How Nintendo makes its amiibo toys play for Wii U". Polygon. Retrieved October 26, 2014. 
  8. ^ Corriea, Alexa (March 14, 2013). "Pokémon Rumble U will launch with seven NFC-compatible figurines". Polygon. Retrieved August 9, 2014. 
  9. ^ "Nintendo Shows Off NFC Mario Figurine for Wii U, 3DS". IGN. Retrieved October 27, 2014. 
  10. ^ "E3 2014: Nintendo's Amiibo Toy Project Revealed". IGN. Retrieved June 10, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b c Molen, Brad (June 11, 2014). "Here are Nintendo's new 'Super Smash Bros.' Amiibo toys for Wii U". Engadget. Retrieved June 14, 2014. 
  12. ^ a b Karmali, Luke. "First Two Waves of Amiibo Detailed With Release Dates". IGN. Retrieved October 7, 2014. 
  13. ^ Joshi, Arjun Keval (January 14, 2015). "Nintendo Reveals New Range, Details and Compatibility for amiibo". Nintendo Life. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  14. ^ "The new 3DS gets Amiibo support with Nintendo's latest update". TechRadar. Retrieved December 26, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Third Quarter Financial Results Briefing for Fiscal Year Ending March 2015". Nintendo. 
  16. ^ "These 3 New Yoshi Amiibo Are Made of Yarn". IGN. Retrieved 7 April 2015. 
  17. ^ "New Animal Crossing is the First Amiibo Game to Use Cards". IGN. Retrieved 7 April 2015. 
  18. ^ "Amiibo in the Form of Cards Coming This Year". IGN. Retrieved 7 April 2015. 
  19. ^ Fahey, Mike (January 14, 2015). "How Amiibo Work In Nintendo's New Games, And At What Cost". Kotaku. Retrieved January 14, 2015. 
  20. ^ "E3 2014: Nintendo on Amiibo, Smash Bros., and Custom Figures". IGN. Retrieved October 26, 2014. 
  21. ^ a b c d "Which amiibo work with which Nintendo games? Here's what we know". Polygon. Retrieved November 1, 2014. 
  22. ^ McWhertor, Michael (December 11, 2014). "Nintendo's amiibo toys now being supported by third-party games". Polygon. Retrieved April 5, 2015. 
  23. ^ "Smash Bros. Wii U's Amiibo in Action". IGN. Retrieved October 26, 2014. 
  24. ^ "Kirby and the Rainbow Curse has four-player co-op, amiibo support". Polygon. Retrieved December 3, 2014. 
  25. ^ Otero, Jose (April 1, 2015). "Nintendo Shows Off Splatoon Amiibo and 1v1 Mode". IGN. Retrieved April 1, 2015. 
  26. ^ Zangari, Alex (December 18, 2014). "Miyamoto Discusses How the GamePad is Used in Star Fox for Wii U". Gamnesia. Retrieved December 22, 2014. 
  27. ^ a b "amiibo by Nintendo - Compatibility chart". Retrieved January 31, 2015. 
  28. ^ Doolan, Liam (November 9, 2014). "Bandai Namco Announces Ace Combat: Assault Horizon Legacy Plus For 3DS". Nintendo Life. Retrieved January 1, 2015. 
  29. ^ McFerran, Damien (December 12, 2014). "3DS Brawler One Piece: Super Grand Battle! X Is Getting amiibo Support". Nintendo Life. Retrieved January 1, 2015. 
  30. ^ "Xenoblade Chronicles comes to New Nintendo 3DS on April 10". Polygon. 
  31. ^ Green, Lisa (March 20, 2015). "Style Savvy Sequel Lets You Accessorize With Your amiibo Figures". Nintendo Life. Retrieved March 20, 2015. 
  32. ^ http://gematsu.com/2015/04/animal-crossing-happy-home-designer-announced-for-3ds
  33. ^ "E3 2014: Nintendo on Amiibo, Smash Bros., and Custom Figurines". 
  34. ^ "amiibo Lineup - Nintendo". 
  35. ^ http://i.imgur.com/u9ytc9E.png
  36. ^ http://imgur.com/5Ok72sM
  37. ^ http://i.imgur.com/VIZzb47.png
  38. ^ http://i.imgur.com/d72BYpp.png
  39. ^ http://i.imgur.com/x8Wencj.png
  40. ^ http://i.imgur.com/N1eQInV.png
  41. ^ a b c "Image toked off on Nintendo direct". i.imgur.com. Retrieved 2015-04-02. 
  42. ^ "Here Are All of the Retailer-Exclusive Amiibo". December 16, 2014. 
  43. ^ http://www.ign.com/articles/2015/04/02/ness-amiibo-is-a-gamestop-exclusive
  44. ^ http://www.target.com/p/nintendo-amiibo-jigglypuff-target-exclusive/-/A-17315174
  45. ^ http://www.toysrus.ca/product/index.jsp?productId=62616606

External links[edit]