Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Communist Party of China

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Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Communist Party of China
中国共产党中央纪律检查委员会
中國共產黨中央紀律檢查委員會
Zhōngguó Gòngchăndăng Zhōngyāng Jìlǜ Jiănchá Wĕiyuánhuì
Danghui.svg
The emblem of the Communist Party of China
Agency overview
Formed November 1949

(etc.)
Jurisdiction  People's Republic of China
Headquarters Beijing
Agency executives Wang Qishan, Secretary
Zhao Hongzhu, Huang Shuxian (黄树贤 (zh)), Li Yufu, Du Jincai, Wu Yuliang (吴玉良 (zh)), Zhang Jun, Chen Wenqing, Wang Wei, Deputy Secretaries
Parent agency CPC National Congress
Website www.12388.gov.cn (Chinese)
Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Communist Party of China
Traditional Chinese 中國共產黨中央紀律檢查委員會
Simplified Chinese 中国共产党中央纪律检查委员会

The Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the Communist Party of China (often referred to in Chinese as Zhongjiwei, 中纪委) is an organization run under the National Congress of the Communist Party of China charged with rooting out corruption and malfeasance among party cadres. Its current Secretary is Wang Qishan, who is also a member of the Politburo Standing Committee.

History[edit]

This body was established in 1927 as the Central Control Commission of the Communist Party of China, eventually changing its name to Central Commission for Discipline Inspection in 1949, after the establishment of the People's Republic of China. In 1955 the name was reversed to Central Control Commission, which operated under Vice Chairman of the People's Republic of China Dong Biwu. During the Cultural Revolution, its functions were subsumed by newly created "revolutionary organs." It was re-established in 1978 as the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection by the Third Plenary Session of the 11th CPC Central Committee.

According to the Constitution of the Communist Party of China, the Central Commission is directly under the CPC National Congress and on the same level with the CPC Central Committee. It is charged with rooting out corruption and malfeasance among party cadres.[1]

On January 4, 2006, the DICCPC set up a website for citizens to report on corruption by local officials, allowing whistleblowers to avoid retribution.[2]

Shuanggui[edit]

Shuanggui means “double designations”. In 2006 Gan Yisheng, secretary-general of the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection of the CPC said it means Party members attend questioning sessions at a designated place for a designated duration. [3] Investigations and prosecutions of cadres who are suspected of corruption are conducted confidentially in a system which is separate from ordinary Chinese law enforcement and courts which are subject to influence by local cadres. According to The New York Times shuanggui [4] is greatly feared by corrupt party functionaries, as suspects are subjected to severe physical and psychological pressure. The system has resulted in successful investigation and prosecution of a number of corrupt cadres including some very powerful party officials. There is little sympathy by the Chinese public for corrupt officials who get caught up in the system, but also skepticism regarding the body's effectiveness.[5]

Yu Qiyi, a former chief engineer of a state-owned company who had been detained in connection with an investigation into a land deal, spent 38 days in detention and suffered internal and external injuries due to torture. He died on April 9, 2013, one day after his head was held in a tub of icy water by six investigators attempting to extract a confession.[6]

List of Secretaries[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]