Grade I listed churches in the East Riding of Yorkshire

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St Mary's Church, Beverley

The East Riding of Yorkshire is a local government district with the status of a unitary authority. For ceremonial purposes it includes the neighbouring city and unitary authority of Kingston upon Hull.[1]

Buildings in England are given listed building status by the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, acting on the recommendation of English Heritage.[2] Listed status gives the structure national recognition and protection against alteration or demolition without authorisation. Grade I listed buildings are defined as being of "exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important"; only 2.5 per cent of listed buildings are included in this grade.[3] This is a complete list of Grade I listed churches and chapels in the East Riding of Yorkshire (including Kingston upon Hull) as recorded in the National Heritage List for England.

Christian churches have existed in the area covered by this list since Anglo-Saxon times, although architectural features from that era are uncommon. Norman features are much more common and are found in many churches, including St Martin, Burton Agnes,[4] St Mary, Fridaythorpe,[5] All Hallows, Goodmanham.,[6] and St Nicholas, Newbald.[7] All but three of the churches in the list were built before the 17th century, and all of them contain features of English Gothic architecture, all periods of this style being represented. Three churches were built in the 19th century. The Chapel of the Virgin and St Everilda at Everingham (1836–39) is a Roman Catholic chapel in Italianate style.[8] The other two churches are in Gothic Revival style: St Leonard, Scorborough (1857–59),[9] and St Mary, South Dalton (1858–61).[10] Gothic Revival architecture is also found in additions made to churches during the 19th and 20th centuries in, for example, St James, Nunburnholme,[11] and All Saints, Skipsea.[12]

The area contains little good material for building churches, much of it lying on chalk and clay. There are some deposits of limestone and sandstone, but their quality does not allow for the production of a good ashlar finish. Many churches in York are built from better quality limestone quarried from outside the area, from Tadcaster and Thorner. An unusual building material for some of the churches in the area is "cobble", which consists of rounded boulders from the beach at Holderness.[13] Churches in the list containing cobbles include All Saints, Easington,[14] All Saints, Preston,[15] and St Peter and St Paul, Burton Pidsea.[16]

Churches[edit]


Name Location Photograph Notes
Holy Trinity Acaster Malbis
53°54′19″N 1°05′52″W / 53.9052°N 1.0978°W / 53.9052; -1.0978 (Holy Trinity, Acaster Malbis)
Acaster Malbis, Holy Trinity Church.jpg Holy Trinity has a cruciform plan, consisting of a three-bay nave, a two-bay chancel. and single-bay transepts. It dates from the 14th century. In 1886 C. Hodgson Fowler restored it and added a wooden shingled bell tower and octagonal spire. Some of the windows contain 14th-century stained glass. Inside the church is the 14th-century effigy of a knight. The elaborated pulpit dates from the 17th century.[17][18] In North Yorkshire.
All Saints Adlingfleet
53°40′43″N 0°43′26″W / 53.6787°N 0.7238°W / 53.6787; -0.7238 (All Saints, Adlingfleet)
All Saints Church Adlingfleet.jpg All Saints dates mainly from the 13th century, with re-set north and south doorways from the previous century. The south aisle, clerestory and tower were added in the 15th century. The chancel was altered in the late 18th century. The church was restored in 1828, and again in 1955–57, the latter restoration being by George Pace. In the chancel is a 13th-century piscina. Also in the church are numerous monuments, dating from the 14th century and later.[19][20]
St Nicholas Askham Bryan
53°55′46″N 1°09′29″W / 53.9294°N 1.1581°W / 53.9294; -1.1581 (St Nicholas, Askham Bryan)
Askham Bryan.jpg This is a small 12th-century church consisting of a continuous nave and chancel with a south porch and a north vestry. It has Norman features, including round-headed windows, and three orders of arches in the porch. At the west end is a single bellcote surmounted by a cross finial.[21][22]
All Saints Aughton
53°50′22″N 0°56′07″W / 53.83934°N 0.9352°W / 53.83934; -0.9352 (All Saints, Aughton)
Aughton, All Saints Church.jpg Part of the church is built in limestone, with the north aisle and the chancel in brick. It originates from the 12th century with a Norman nave, an Early English north aisle, and a Perpendicular west tower and chancel. The church was restored in 1891–93. On the tower are carvings of grotesques, and a row of seven shields. The Norman font is drum-shaped.[23][24]
St Andrew Bainton
53°57′30″N 0°31′50″W / 53.9584°N 0.5306°W / 53.9584; -0.5306 (St Andrew, Bainton)
St Andrew's Church, Bainton - geograph.org.uk - 1453807.jpg
Most of the church was built in the 1330s–1340s, although the southeast corner of the chancel dates from about 1280. In 1715 the spire was damaged by wind and had to be truncated. In 1840–43 the church was restored by Henry Wheatley, and a further restoration was carried out in 1866–89 by James Fowler when the spire was removed. Inside the church are a Norman font, a pulpit of 1903 by Temple Moore, and stalls of 1949 by George Pace.[25][26]
All Saints Barmston
54°00′46″N 0°14′12″W / 54.0128°N 0.2366°W / 54.0128; -0.2366 (All Saints, Barmston)
All Saints Church Barmston.jpg The nave and chancel are originally Norman, dating from the 12th century. The southwest tower and most of the windows date from the 15th century and are Perpendicular in style. The font is Norman, and also in the church is a hogback stone that has been moved from elsewhere. A window in the south aisle contains fragments of medieval stained glass figures.[27][28]
Beverley Minster Beverley
53°50′21″N 0°25′28″W / 53.8393°N 0.4245°W / 53.8393; -0.4245 (Beverley Minster)
Beverley Minster - geograph.org.uk - 1733055.jpg It is likely that a monastic church was built on the site in the 9th century. This was replaced by a collegiate church from 1214, with additions and alterations being made until the 15th century. Since the Reformation it has functioned as a parish church. It is mainly in Perpendicular style, with twin towers at the west end. There were restorations in the 18th and 19th centuries, the latter being carried out by George Gilbert Scott.[29][30][31]
St Mary Beverley
53°50′39″N 0°26′01″W / 53.8442°N 0.4337°W / 53.8442; -0.4337 (St Mary, Beverley)
Church of Saint Mary, Beverley - geograph.org.uk - 806927.jpg Established in the middle of the 12th century, most of the church dates from the 14th and 15th centuries. Around its exterior are battlemented parapets, crocketed pinnacles, and flying buttresses. During the 19th century it was restored by A. W. N. Pugin and E. W. Pugin, and later by George Gilbert Scott. The ceiling of the chancel, dating from 1445, is decorated with panels containing paintings of 40 English kings, and the early 15th-century choir stalls contain 43 carved misericords.[32][33]
St Edith Bishop Wilton
53°59′12″N 0°47′03″W / 53.9868°N 0.7842°W / 53.9868; -0.7842 (St Edith, Bishop Wilton)
St Edith's Church, Bishop Wilton.jpg The church dates from the 12th century with an elaborately carved Norman chancel arch and south doorway. The west tower with its spire were added in the 14th century. The church was restored in 1858–59 by J. Loughborough Pearson for Sir Tatton Sykes, 4th Baronet. Inside the church is a choir screen designed by G.  E. Street and a font and cover by Temple Moore.[34][35]
St Andrew Boynton
54°05′43″N 0°15′49″W / 54.0952°N 0.2636°W / 54.0952; -0.2636 (St Andrew, Boynton)
St. Andrew's Church, Boynton - geograph.org.uk - 1451790.jpg The west tower dates from the 15th century, and the rest of the church from 1768–70, the likely architect being John Carr. In 1910 the interior of the church was reordered by John Bilston. Inside the church is a Norman font, a pulpit dated 1768, and monuments from the 17th century and later.[36][37]
St Mary Brandesburton
53°54′46″N 0°17′50″W / 53.9129°N 0.2972°W / 53.9129; -0.2972 (St Mary, Brandesburton)
St Mary's Church, Brandesburton - geograph.org.uk - 785165.jpg The church originated in the 12th century, and has a surviving Norman priest's doorway, and Norman fragments inside the tower. The aisles and west tower date from the 13th century. In 1892 the church was restored by W. S. Weatherley. Inside the church are brasses dating from the 14th century.[38][39]
Bridlington Priory Bridlington
54°05′40″N 0°12′06″W / 54.0944°N 0.2018°W / 54.0944; -0.2018 (Bridlington Priory)
Bridlington Priory.jpg This originated as an Augustinian priory. Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries it was demolished, other than the nave and aisles of the church, and the gateway. The nave was converted into the parish church of St Mary, its eastern three bays forming the chancel. At the west end are two dissimilar towers, the northwest dating from the early 13th century, and the southwest from the 15th century. In the 1870s George Gilbert Scott added a top stage to both towers.[40][41]
All Saints Bubwith
53°49′01″N 0°55′14″W / 53.8170°N 0.9206°W / 53.8170; -0.9206 (All Saints, Bubwith)
All Saints Church Bubwith.jpg Originating in the 12th century, additions were made in the following two centuries. In the 15th century, the south aisle, the clerestory and the west tower were paid for from the will of the Rt Revd Nicholas de Bubwith, late Bishop of Bath and Wells. The church has retained a Norman chancel arch. The octagonal font dates from the 15th century.[42][43]
St Andrew Bugthorpe
54°00′40″N 0°49′22″W / 54.0112°N 0.8227°W / 54.0112; -0.8227 (St Andrew, Bugthorpe)
Parish Church of St. Andrew, Bugthorpe.jpg
The church dates from the 12th century with a Norman chancel arch. The west tower was added in the 15th century. The nave was rebuilt in 1858–59 by Mallinson and Healey. In 1936–37 the interior was restored and refurnished by H. S. Goodhart-Rendel. Inside the church are a coffin lid from the late 12th or early 13th century, and a cross-slab from the 13th century.[44][45]
All Saints Burstwick
53°44′03″N 0°08′25″W / 53.7342°N 0.1404°W / 53.7342; -0.1404 (All Saints, Burstwick)
All Saints Church, Burstwick.jpg The nave dates from the 13th century, the south chapel from the early 14th century, and the tower, chancel, north aisle, and north chapel from the 15th century. There were restorations in 1830, 1853 and 1893. Hanging in the church are the Royal Arms of Charles I, on the reverse of which is a painting of the king's execution, painted by the then vicar and placed in the church in 1676. There are fragments of 15th-century stained glass in a chancel window.[46][47]
St Martin Burton Agnes
54°03′13″N 0°19′05″W / 54.0535°N 0.3180°W / 54.0535; -0.3180 (St Martin, Burton Agnes)
St Martins Church Burton Agnes.jpg Originating in the 11th century, the body of the church is basically Norman, with a Perpendicular tower and clerestory added in the 15th century. The chancel was rebuilt in 1730, and other alterations were carried out in 1840–54 by the vicar, Revd Robert Wilberforce, in memory of his father, William. Inside the church is a hammerbeam roof, choir stalls with misericords, a Norman font, a pulpit dated 1730, and monuments, the earliest dating from 1337.[4][48]
St Peter and St Paul Burton Pidsea
53°45′40″N 0°06′08″W / 53.7612°N 0.1023°W / 53.7612; -0.1023 (St Peter and St Paul, Burton Pidsea)
St Peter St Paul Church Burton Pidsea.jpg This church dates from the early 13th century, with additions in the following century, and a tower added in the 15th century. The chancel was rebuilt in 1838, and the church was restored in 1866–68 by Charles Hutchinson. The octagonal font dates from the 13th century.[16][49]
St Mary Cottingham
53°46′56″N 0°24′42″W / 53.7823°N 0.4116°W / 53.7823; -0.4116 (St Mary, Cottingham)
Church of St. Mary the Virgin, Cottingham - geograph.org.uk - 747884.jpg This is a cruciform plan church, the nave, aisles and transepts dating from the early 14th century, and the chancel from the later part of the century. They are in Decorated style, with the 15th-century central tower in Perpendicular style. Pinnacles were added to the tower in 1744. Inside the church are many memorials, and much of the stained glass was designed by Jean-Baptiste Capronnier.[50][51][52]
All Saints Driffield
54°00′28″N 0°26′31″W / 54.0077°N 0.4420°W / 54.0077; -0.4420 (All Saints, Driffield)
All Saints Church Driffield 2.jpg
The church has pre-Conquest origins, the nave and clerestory date from the 12th century, the aisles and chancel from the early 13th century, and the west tower from the 15th century. In 1878–80 George Gilbert Scott, Jr. rebuilt the north aisle, and added the north chapel. Inside the church are fragments of carved stones dating from the 12th and 13th centuries.[53][54]
All Saints Easington
53°39′01″N 0°06′55″E / 53.6502°N 0.1152°E / 53.6502; 0.1152 (All Saints, Easington)
All Saints Church Easington.JPG
All Saints originated in the 12th century, with additions and alterations during the following four centuries. The porch was rebuilt in about 1720. There were restorations in 1863 and 1890. In the chancel is a 12th-century free-standing piscina. On the north arcade are medieval wall paintings. The oldest monument is dated 1671.[14][55]
St Michael Eastrington
53°45′36″N 0°47′36″W / 53.7601°N 0.7933°W / 53.7601; -0.7933 (St Michael, Eastrington)
Eglise Eastrington.jpg The church dates from the 11th or 12th century, with Norman features in the south porch and elsewhere. Additions and alterations were made in the 13th-15th centuries, some of which are Decorated, and others are Perpendicular. A window in the north wall of the church contains fragments of 14th-century stained glass. Also in the church are monuments dating from the 15th century.[56][57][58]
Chapel of the Virgin and St Everilda Everingham
53°52′09″N 0°46′34″W / 53.8693°N 0.7761°W / 53.8693; -0.7761 (Chapel of the Virgin and St Everilda, Everingham)
Everingham Catholic Church High Altar.jpg
This is a Roman Catholic chapel built adjacent to Everingham Hall between 1836 and 1839. It was designed by Agostino Giorgioli, and its construction was supervised by John Harper of York, who also redesigned the entrance front. It is in Italianate style, and consists of a single-bay narthex, a seven-bay nave, transepts at the east end, and a single-bay apsidal sanctuary. Inside the church, the bays of the nave are separated by Corinthian columns, and each bay contains the statue of one of the twelve apostles by Luigi Bozzoni. The ceiling of the nave is a coffered tunnel vault.[8][59]
St Mary Fridaythorpe
54°01′19″N 0°39′59″W / 54.0220°N 0.6664°W / 54.0220; -0.6664 (St Mary, Fridaythorpe)
St Mary's Church, Fridaythorpe.jpg The remaining Norman features include the west tower with its south doorway, the chancel arch, and a blocked window in the chancel. There were later additions and alterations including a restoration in 1902–03 by C. Hodgson Fowler for Sir Tatton Sykes, which included rebuilding the north aisle, and adding the south porch and a vestry.[5][60]
St Michael Garton
53°48′00″N 0°04′21″W / 53.7999°N 0.0725°W / 53.7999; -0.0725 (St Michael, Garton)
St Michaels Church Garton with Grimston.jpg The west tower dates from the early part of the 13th century, and the chancel from later in that century. The south aisle and the south chancel chapel are from the later 14th century, and the porch is from the 15th century. Inside the church is a medieval screen with Perpendicular tracery, and a mid 13th-century octagonal font. In the south porch is a re-set medieval cross head.[61]
St Michael Garton on the Wolds
54°01′14″N 0°30′10″W / 54.0206°N 0.5027°W / 54.0206; -0.5027 (St Michael, Garton on the Wolds)
Saint Michael and All Angels Church, Garton on the Wolds, Yorkshire, England - 2004.jpg The church was built in about 1132, with later additions and alterations. During the 19th century, work was carried out by J. Loughborough Pearson, and later by G. E. Street. On the walls of the nave and chancel are paintings executed by Clayton and Bell.[62][63]
All Hallows Goodmanham
53°52′37″N 0°38′52″W / 53.8769°N 0.6479°W / 53.8769; -0.6479 (All Hallows, Goodmanham)
All Hallows Church, Goodmanham - geograph.org.uk - 1432153.jpg The church is said to have originated in the 7th century on a site previously occupied by a pagan temple. The present church is basically Norman, with the nave, tower and north aisle from the 12th century, the chancel from the following century, and the south porch added in the 14th century. Inside the church are two fonts, one is hexagonal, dating possibly from the 12th century, which was rescued from a farmyard in about 1850, and the other is octagonal and dated 1530.[6][64]
All Saints Halsham
53°43′51″N 0°04′45″W / 53.7307°N 0.0793°W / 53.7307; -0.0793 (All Saints, Halsham)
All Saints Church Halsham.jpg All Saints originated in the 12th century, with later additions and alterations. It was restored in 1869–70 by Ewan Christian. The church includes a pulpit dated 1634, and monuments from the 15th century and later.[65][66]
St John of Beverley Harpham
54°02′19″N 0°20′01″W / 54.0386°N 0.3336°W / 54.0386; -0.3336 (St John, Harpham)
St John of Beverley Church Harpham.jpg The church is dedicated to John of Beverley who is reputed to have been born in the parish. It dates from the 12th century and has retained some Norman features. The chancel, west tower and north chapel are from the 14th century, and the east window dated 1909 is by Temple Moore. The church contains a number of monuments, the oldest dating from the 14th century.[67][68]
St Martin Hayton
53°54′14″N 0°45′08″W / 53.9039°N 0.7521°W / 53.9039; -0.7521 (St Martin, Hayton)
Hayton parish church - geograph.org.uk - 67538.jpg With a plain exterior, the interior of the church contains Norman features, some of which have been re-set. Also in the church are 17th-century wall paintings. The tower dates from the 14th century, and was heightened at a later date.[69][70]
St. Augustine Hedon
53°44′29″N 0°11′59″W / 53.7415°N 0.1996°W / 53.7415; -0.1996 (St Augustine, Hedon)
Hedon church.jpg
The church dates from the 13th century, with the tower at the crossing added in 1428. Otherwise there had been little change since, other than a restoration of the church between 1868–77 by G.  E. Street. The tower was restored by J. T. Webster in 1881. The font dates from the 14th century. Also in the church is a 13th-century black marble tomb cover, and the 14th-century effigy of a civilian with a sword.[71][72]
All Saints Hessle
53°43′27″N 0°26′09″W / 53.7241°N 0.4358°W / 53.7241; -0.4358 (All Saints, Hessle)
All Saints Church Hessle.jpg A church is recorded in the Domesday Book, but the present church dates from the 12th century, the earliest fabric being in the nave. The west steeple was built in the 15th century. In 1868–70 the church was remodelled by the Hull architect R. G. Smith; this consisted of extending the nave at the east end by two bays, widening the aisles, and demolishing and rebuilding the chancel to the east, using the original material.[73][74][75]
All Saints Holme-on-Spalding-Moor
53°50′25″N 0°45′14″W / 53.8403°N 0.7538°W / 53.8403; -0.7538 (All Saints, Holme)
All Saints Church Holme on Spalding Moor 1.jpg
The nave and aisles date from the 13th century, and the upper part of the tower and the clerestory from the 15th century. The south porch was added in the 18th century. The church was restored between 1906 and 1911 by Temple Moore. Much of the architectural is Perpendicular. Inside the church are a 12th-century octagonal font, a 14th-century piscina, and screens carved by Robert (Mouseman) Thompson.[76][77]
St Nicholas Hornsea
53°54′40″N 0°10′24″W / 53.9110°N 0.1732°W / 53.9110; -0.1732 (St Nicholas, Hornsea)
Hornsea Church - geograph.org.uk - 324991.jpg The church dates from the 13th century, with later additions and alterations. It was restored in 1865–67 by George Gilbert Scott, and further work was carried out between 1899 and 1907. The octagonal font dates from the 13th century. Also in the church are effigies, the earliest of which are a pair brought here from Nunkeeling Priory dating from the late 13th and the early 14th centuries. Built into the west wall of the porch are two small late-medieval carvings.[78][79][80]
Howden Minster Howden
53°44′43″N 0°52′03″W / 53.7453°N 0.8675°W / 53.7453; -0.8675 (Howden Minster)
Howden Minster - geograph.org.uk - 224374.jpg
This consists of a former collegiate church with an attached grammar school and chapter house. After the Reformation the nave continued in use as a parish church, and the east end became a ruin. The church originated in about 1270–75, the tower was begun in the late 14th century, and the grammar school was added in about 1500. Restorations were carried out in the late 19th century, with alterations in 2006–11. The ruins are under the care of English Heritage.[81][82][83]
St Mary Huggate
53°59′17″N 0°39′21″W / 53.9881°N 0.6559°W / 53.9881; -0.6559 (St Mary, Huggate)
St Marys Church Huggate.jpg The nave and aisles date from the 12th century, and the chancel from the following century. Some Norman features have been retained, including the chancel arch. The tower has a recessed spire, and dates from the 14th century. The clerestory is in Perpendicular style. Restoration was carried out in 1864.[84][85]
St Peter Humbleton
53°47′44″N 0°08′23″W / 53.7956°N 0.1396°W / 53.7956; -0.1396 (St Peter, Humbleton)
St Peter's Church, Humbleton2.jpg The nave and chancel are from the 13th century, the west tower was built in the 14th century, the aisles were added the following century, and the south porch is dated 1744. Inside the church is part of an alabaster monument to a man who died in 1637.[86]
St Nicholas Keyingham
53°42′40″N 0°06′54″W / 53.7111°N 0.1149°W / 53.7111; -0.1149 (St Nicholas, Keyingham)
St Nicholas Church, Keyingham.jpg The church dates from the 12th-13th century, with later additions and alterations. It was restored during the 19th century, and again in 1914. The spire was removed from the west tower and its parapet was rebuilt in 1969. The oldest monument is dated 1647.[87]
All Saints Kilham
54°03′53″N 0°22′31″W / 54.0646°N 0.3754°W / 54.0646; -0.3754 (All Saints, Kilham)
Kilham church.jpg The earliest parts of the church date from the early 12th century, and include a Norman nave and south doorway. The chancel dates from the early 14th century, and the west tower from the following century. The church was restored in 1865–66. Inside the church is a 13th-century sedilia, a Norman font, and Georgian wall tablets from the 18th century.[88][89]
Holy Trinity Kingston upon Hull
53°44′30″N 0°20′03″W / 53.7417°N 0.3343°W / 53.7417; -0.3343 (Holy Trinity, Hull)
Holy Trinity Church, Hull (by David Wright - 2006 09 06).jpg Holy Trinity is, by area, one of the largest parish churches in England and, when its transepts were built in the early 14th century, substantial amounts of brick were used for the first time in an English church. The church was built mainly between 1300 and 1425, with the tower added in about 1500, and vestries in the 19th and 20th centuries. Restorations were carried out by H. F. Lockwood in 1841–45, and George Gilbert Scott between 1859 and 1872. There was a further restoration in 1906 by F. S. Brodrick.[90][91]
St James Sutton-on-Hull
Kingston upon Hull
53°46′51″N 0°18′17″W / 53.7809°N 0.3046°W / 53.7809; -0.3046 (St James, Sutton, Hull)
St. James's Church, Sutton - geograph.org.uk - 266573.jpg The church originates from about 1347 when the nave and south aisle were built. The west tower was added in about 1400 when the aisle was extended. There have subsequently been further additions, alterations and restorations. Inside the church are a 13th-century tub font, and a chest tomb dating from about 1349.[92]
All Saints Kirby Underdale
54°01′01″N 0°46′04″W / 54.0170°N 0.7677°W / 54.0170; -0.7677 (All Saints, Kirby Underdale)
All Saints Church Kirby Underdale.jpg The west tower and nave are Norman, dating from the 11th century, and the arcades are from the following century. A vestry was added to the south of the tower in 1828. G. E. Street completely rebuilt the chancel in 1870–71, and added a south porch. A Roman sculpture of Mercury has been incorporated into the west end of the north aisle, and there are fragments of medieval graveslabs elsewhere in the walls.[93][94]
St Mary Kirkburn
53°58′57″N 0°30′27″W / 53.9824°N 0.5076°W / 53.9824; -0.5076 (St Mary, Kirkburn)
St Mary, Kirkburn.jpg St Mary's was built in the middle of the 12th century and retains many Norman features, particularly in its tower and chancel. The chancel was partly rebuilt in 1818, and the church was restored in 1856–57 by J.Loughborough Pearson for Sir Tatton Sykes, 4th Baronet. Inside the church is a Norman font, and two items designed by George Edmund Street, the chancel screen, and the marble reredos.[95][96]
St Andrew Kirk Ella
53°45′14″N 0°27′15″W / 53.7539°N 0.4541°W / 53.7539; -0.4541 (St Andrew, Kirk Ella)
St Andrews Church.JPG The chancel dates from the early 13th century, and the west tower, in contrasting white magnesium limestone, was built between 1450 and 1454. Its dark pinnacles were added in the 1882–83. There was much rebuilding elsewhere during the 19th century,including the nave, porch, and south chancel chapel. Inside the church, under the tower, are the rare remains of a Decorated screen from the early 14th century. There are also numerous monuments from the 18th and 19th centuries.[97][98]
St Peter Langtoft
54°05′21″N 0°27′36″W / 54.0892°N 0.4600°W / 54.0892; -0.4600 (St Peter, Langtoft)
St Peter, Langtoft.jpg The west tower and south arcade date from the 13th century, and the chancel and north aisle from the following century. In 1900–03 the church was restored, and the north aisle were added, by C. Hodgson Fowler Inside the church is a 12th-century font removed from a local church that has been demolished.[99]
St Catherine Leconfield
53°52′48″N 0°27′26″W / 53.8801°N 0.4573°W / 53.8801; -0.4573 (St Catherine, Leconfield)
Church of Saint Catherine, Leconfield.jpg A church with a nave dating from the 12th century or earlier, the aisles from the early 13th century, and the chancel from later that century. The west tower and south porch are from the 16th century. Some of the windows contain stained glass from the 14th and 15th centuries.[100]
St Mary Lockington
53°54′30″N 0°29′01″W / 53.9083°N 0.4836°W / 53.9083; -0.4836 (St Mary, Lockington)
St Marys Church Lockington.jpg The church dates from the 12th century, with later additions and alterations. The 13th-century west tower was rebuilt in the 17th century. The 18th-century pulpit has a reader's desk and a sounding board. The south chapel was remodelled in 1634–35; its walls are lined with 173 panels, each of which contains a coat of arms connected with the Estoft family.[101]
All Saints Londesborough
53°53′51″N 0°40′47″W / 53.8974°N 0.6796°W / 53.8974; -0.6796 (All Saints, Londesborough)
All Saints Church Londesborough 5.jpg The south doorway is Norman with a sundial in its tympanum. Incorporated in the wall above the doorway is a cross-head dating from the late 9th or early 10th century. Elsewhere the architecture is in Early English or Perpendicular style. In the church are monuments to the Earls of Burlington, including one to the architect Richard Boyle, the 3rd Earl.[102][103][104]
All Saints Low Catton
53°58′38″N 0°55′37″W / 53.9772°N 0.9269°W / 53.9772; -0.9269 (All Saints, Low Catton)
All Saints Church Low Catton.jpg The church dates from the 12th century, and there are remaining Norman features in the north transept. The aisles were added in the 13th century, and the southwest tower in the 15th century. In 1866 G. E. Street largely rebuilt the chancel, whose roof is much higher than that of the nave. The east window was designed by Edward Burne-Jones and made by Morris & Co.[105][106]
All Saints Market Weighton
53°51′54″N 0°40′01″W / 53.8649°N 0.6670°W / 53.8649; -0.6670 (All Saints, Market Weighton)
All Saints Church Market Weighton.jpg The oldest fabric is in the nave and dates from the 11th century. The chancel and lower part of the tower are from the 13th century, and the aisles from the 14th century. The lower part of the tower is in stone and the upper part, heightened in 1785, is in brick. The church was restored in 1870–72. The Norman font dates from the 11th or 12th century.[107][108]
St Margaret Millington
53°57′22″N 0°44′10″W / 53.9562°N 0.7362°W / 53.9562; -0.7362 (St Margaret, Millington)
St Margarets Church Millington 1.jpg St Margaret's is a small church consisting of a 12th-century nave, a 14th—century chancel, and a 19th-century west bellcote and porch. The south doorway is Norman. Inside the church is a west gallery, and altar rails carved by Robert (Mouseman) Thompson.[109][110]
All Saints Nafferton
54°00′59″N 0°23′26″W / 54.0163°N 0.3906°W / 54.0163; -0.3906 (All Saints, Nafferton)
All Saints Church Nafferton.jpg The nave was built in the 12th century, and has a Norman chancel arch. The chancel itself dates from the late 13th century, the aisles from the 14th and 15th centuries, and the west tower from the 15th century. Porches were added during the 19th century. To the south of the chancel arch is a squint. The font consists of a tub with lozenge and cable decoration. All the pews are 19th-century box pews.[111][112]
St Nicholas Newbald
53°49′03″N 0°36′59″W / 53.8175°N 0.6165°W / 53.8175; -0.6165 (St Nicholas, Newbald)
St Nicholas Church North Newbald.jpg This cruciform, aisleless church is considered to be the most complete Norman church in the East Riding, with four Norman arches at the crossing. It dates from about 1140. The belfry stage was added to the tower in the 13th century, and the chancel and north vestry in the 15th century. There were four restorations during the 19th century. The 12th-century tub font stands on eight columns, and is carved with foliage.[7][113]
All Saints North Cave
53°47′00″N 0°38′26″W / 53.7832°N 0.6405°W / 53.7832; -0.6405 (All Saints, North Cave)
All Saints Church North Cave.jpg The base of the tower is Norman, dating from the 12th century. The nave and chancel are from the following century, and the Perpendicular clerestory and upper part of the tower were added in the 15th century. The porch is dated 1753. The church was restored in 1892 by Smith and Broderick. On the south wall of the chancel is a painted rubric for the Confession and Absolution.[114][115]
St James Nunburnholme
53°55′10″N 0°42′39″W / 53.9194°N 0.7107°W / 53.9194; -0.7107 (St James, Nunburnholme)
St. James' Church, Nunburnholme - geograph.org.uk - 1430365.jpg The nave dates from the 12th century, and the chancel from the early part of the following century. A restoration was carried out in 1872–73. The west tower and south porch were added in about 1902 by Temple Moore. Inside the church is a 12th-century font. Under the tower are two fragments of a cross-shaft dating from about 1000.[11][116]
St Wilfred Ottringham
53°42′03″N 0°04′52″W / 53.7009°N 0.0811°W / 53.7009; -0.0811 (St Wilfred, Ottringham)
St Wilfrid's Church, Ottringham.jpg
The church dates from the 12th century, with later additions, alterations and restorations. It has a west tower with a recessed broach spire. The octagonal font dates from the 15th  century, and the church contains a full set of 18th-century box pews.[117][118]
St Patrick Patrington
53°40′58″N 0°00′35″W / 53.6828°N 0.0097°W / 53.6828; -0.0097 (St Patrick, Patrington)
Queen of Holderness - geograph.org.uk - 617179.jpg
This church with a cruciform plan dates mainly from the 14th century, with a spire added to its central tower in the 15th century. The fabric of the church incorporates masonry from the 12th-13th century. In the chancel are a sedilia, a piscina and an Easter Sepulchre.[119][120]
St Andrew Paull
53°42′54″N 0°13′30″W / 53.7149°N 0.2251°W / 53.7149; -0.2251 (St Andrew, Paull)
St Andrews Paull.JPG The church replaces an earlier church on a different site that was destroyed in 1355, and it incorporates material from the earlier church. This church was damaged in the Siege of Hull in 1643. It was repaired in 1663, and again in about 1700, and restored in 1879 by J. T. Webster. All the windows contain Perpendicular tracery. The earliest monuments date from the 15th century.[121][122]
All Saints Pocklington
53°55′51″N 0°46′47″W / 53.9307°N 0.7796°W / 53.9307; -0.7796 (All Saints, Pocklington)
All Saints Church Pocklington.jpg The nave dates from the 12th century or earlier. The transepts were added in the 13th century, the west tower and the chancel were built in the 15th century, and the porch was rebuilt in the 19th century, re-using older materials. The font dates from the 12th century, and is set on a 19th-century base. Inside the church are two monuments dating from the 16th century.[123][124]
All Saints Preston
53°45′30″N 0°12′03″W / 53.7583°N 0.2009°W / 53.7583; -0.2009 (All Saints, Preston)
All Saints Church, Preston - geograph.org.uk - 723150.jpg The chancel dates from the 13th century, and was rebuilt in 1870. Other parts of the church date from the 14th to the 16th century. The west tower is Perpendicular. The church was restored in 1878–82 by Smith and Broderick. The octagonal font dates from the 15th century.[15][125]
All Saints Roos
53°44′49″N 0°02′39″W / 53.7469°N 0.0442°W / 53.7469; -0.0442 (All Saints, Roos)
Roos church.jpg The chancel dates from the 13th century, and the nave from the following century. The west tower was built in the 14th century, and raised during the next century. The porch was added in 1842 when the church was restored by L. N. Cottingham. An organ chamber by F. S. Brodrick was built in 1881. There are fragments of medieval stained glass in the clerestory windows.[126][127]
All Saints Rudston
54°05′38″N 0°19′22″W / 54.0938°N 0.3229°W / 54.0938; -0.3229 (All Saints, Rudston)
Rudston Parish Church - geograph.org.uk - 1409350.jpg The west tower and tower arch are Norman dating from the 12th century. The aisles and chancel were built in the 13th century, and the porch in the 19th century. The church was restored in 1861 by G. Fowler Jones. Inside the church are a 12th-century font and a 14th-century piscina and sedilia. Also in the church is a memorial to the author Winifred Holtby, who died in 1935, and who is buried in the churchyard.[128][129]
St Leonard Scorborough
53°53′39″N 0°27′21″W / 53.8942°N 0.4558°W / 53.8942; -0.4558 (St Leonard, Scorborough)
St Leonards, Scorborough.jpg
Built in 1857–59 for Lord Hotham and designed by John L. Pearson in Gothic Revival style.[9][130]
All Saints Shiptonthorpe
53°52′39″N 0°42′18″W / 53.8776°N 0.7050°W / 53.8776; -0.7050 (All Saints, Shiptonthorpe)
Tower of All Saints Parish Church, Shiptonthorpe - geograph.org.uk - 179583.jpg
The nave dates from the 12th century. The west tower, the north aisle and the chancel, with its north chapel, are from the 13th century. The tower was heightened in the 15th century. The church was restored in 1883 by James Demaine.[131][132]
St Helen Skeffling
53°39′00″N 0°04′21″E / 53.6500°N 0.0724°E / 53.6500; 0.0724 (St Helen, Skeffling)
St. Helens, Skeffling - geograph.org.uk - 28425.jpg All the church, apart from the 19th-century south porch, dates from the 1460s. It was restored in 1901. In the chancel are three plain sedilia. The font dates from the 15th century, and the oldest monument in the church dates from 1494.[133][134]
St Giles Skelton
54°00′07″N 1°08′03″W / 54.0019°N 1.1342°W / 54.0019; -1.1342 (St Giles, Skelton)
St Giles, Skelton.jpg This is a small church dating from about 1240. It was restored in 1814–18 by Henry Graham, and in 1863 by Ewan Christian. It is constructed in magnesian limestone with Westmorland slate roofs. The church consists of a two-bay nave and a single-bay chancel, with a bellcote at the junction of the two. In the church are monuments dating from the 18th century.[135] In North Yorkshire.
St Leonard Skerne
53°58′53″N 0°24′20″W / 53.9815°N 0.4056°W / 53.9815; -0.4056 (St Leonard, Skerne)
Saint Leonard's Church, Skerne.jpg This is a small church with the nave and chancel dating from the 12th century. The chancel arch, the south doorway, a blocked south window in the nave, and a north window in the chancel are all in Norman in style. The tower was added in the 15th century, and the vestry and south porch in the 19th century. Inside the church are effigies dating from the mid-14th century.[136][137]
All Saints Skipsea
53°58′40″N 0°13′27″W / 53.9777°N 0.2243°W / 53.9777; -0.2243 (All Saints, Skipsea)
All Saints Church, Skipsea - geograph.org.uk - 1281599.jpg The nave and chancel were built in the 11th century, with the tower aisles and clerestory added in the 15th century. In about 1856–60 James Fowler carried out a restoration, adding a south porch, a north vestry, and rebuilding the arcades. Much of the church is in Perpendicular style, the nave and alsies having embattled parapets.[12]
St Augustine Skirlaugh
53°50′28″N 0°15′59″W / 53.8411°N 0.2663°W / 53.8411; -0.2663 (St Augustine, Skirlaugh)
St Augustine's Parish Church, Skirlaugh.jpg The church was built between 1401 and 1405, replacing an earlier church on the site. It was paid for by the Rt Revd Walter Skirlaw, who was born in the parish and became Bishop of Durham. It is entirely Perpendicular in style. The church was restored by William Botterill and Son in 1878, and further alterations were made in the 1980s.[138][139][140]
St Lawrence Snaith
53°41′32″N 1°01′51″W / 53.6921°N 1.0308°W / 53.6921; -1.0308 (St Lawrence, Snaith)
St Laurence Church Snaith.jpg This church is an Anglo-Saxon foundation, but the present church dates from 1086. There have been additions and alterations since, including a 13th-century tower and a 14th-century chancel. It was restored in 1867–68, and repaired in 1883 and 1910. To the north of the tower is a former consistory court. Also in the church is a monument to the 5th Viscount Downe of 1837 by Francis Chantrey.[141][142]
St Mary South Dalton
53°53′50″N 0°31′46″W / 53.8972°N 0.5295°W / 53.8972; -0.5295 (St Mary, South Dalton)
St. Mary's church and Lych Gate, South Dalton - geograph.org.uk - 1370276.jpg
A new church designed by John L. Pearson in Gothic Revival style. It was built in 1858–61 for the 3rd Lord Hotham. The church has a prominent steeple 208 feet (63 m) high. All the internal fittings were designed by Pearson.[10][143]
St Mary Swine
53°48′23″N 0°16′45″W / 53.8063°N 0.2791°W / 53.8063; -0.2791 (St Mary, Swine)
Priory Church of St Mary the Virgin, Swine - geograph.org.uk - 1192658.jpg Originally this was the eastern part of the nun's church at a Cistercian nunnery dating from about 1180. It was altered in the 14th and 15th centuries. In 1787 the west tower was rebuilt, and a porch and vestry were added in the 19th century. Inside the church are choir stalls with misericords, and monuments dating back to the 14th century.[144]
St Michael and All Angels Sutton upon Derwent
53°55′02″N 0°55′37″W / 53.9171°N 0.9269°W / 53.9171; -0.9269 (St Michael, Sutton upon Derwent)
St Micheal's Church, Sutton upon Derwent.JPG The nave dates from the 12th century, and the chancel from the following century. The west tower was built in the 15th century, and the south porch followed in the 15th–16th century. Inside the church is a re-set 12th-century round arch, and fragments of an 11th-century carved cross.[145]
All Saints Thwing
54°07′02″N 0°23′48″W / 54.1171°N 0.3966°W / 54.1171; -0.3966 (All Saints, Thwing)
All Saints Church Thwing.jpg The church dates from the 12th century, with a Norman south doorway and chancel arch. Much of the rest of the church is Perpendicular. It was restored in 1898–1901 by Temple Moore who rebuilt parts of the church. Inside the church is a Norman font, and monuments dating from the 14th century and later.[146][147]
St Mary Watton
53°56′01″N 0°26′42″W / 53.9336°N 0.4449°W / 53.9336; -0.4449 (St Mary, Watton)
Watton. St Marys Church - geograph.org.uk - 169765.jpg St Mary's is a brick church built in the 15th century, and incorporating fabric from the 13th century. Alterations and additions were made in the 19th century, and a parapet was added to the west tower in the 20th century. Inside the church is a rood screen, and there is a piscina in the south wall of the nave.[148]
St Peter Wawne
53°48′58″N 0°20′39″W / 53.8162°N 0.3442°W / 53.8162; -0.3442 (St Peter, Wawne)
Parish Church of St. Peter, Wawne - geograph.org.uk - 34868.jpg The nave dates from the 12th century, or earlier, the tower and aisles from the early 13th century, and the chancel from the later part of that century. It is constructed in stone, with repairs in brick.[149]
St Mary Welwick
53°40′09″N 0°01′45″E / 53.6693°N 0.0291°E / 53.6693; 0.0291 (St Mary, Welwick)
St.Mary's church, Welwick - geograph.org.uk - 617863.jpg The oldest parts of the church are the tower arch, the eastern part of the nave and the western part of the chancel, which date from the late 13th century. Additions were made during the following century, and the tower was rebuilt in the 15th century. Restorations were carried out in the early 20th century and in about 1980. In the south aisle is an elaborate tomb dating from about 1340. It contains the effigy of a priest wearing the vestments of the Mass, surrounded by four angels. This lies under an ogee arch, and the grave slab is carved with the symbols of the Four Evangelists. On the walls of the nave are traces of wall paintings.[150]
St Helen Wheldrake
53°53′48″N 0°57′45″W / 53.8966°N 0.9624°W / 53.8966; -0.9624 (St Helen, Wheldrake)
Wheldrake 07-01-07 Church.jpg The magnesian limestone tower dates from the 14th century, and the brick nave and the five-sided apse were built in 1779. The tower has a 14th-century west window. The other windows are round-headed, except for the oculus above the south doorway. The octagonal font dates from about 1300.[151][152]

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