Pocatello, Idaho

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the Shoshoni chief that the city is named after, see Pocatello (Shoshoni chief).
Pocatello, Idaho
City
Historic downtown Pocatello in 2007
Historic downtown Pocatello in 2007
Official seal of Pocatello, Idaho
Seal
Nickname(s): US Smile Capital, (The) Gate City
Motto: Gateway to the Northwest
Location in Bannock County and the state of Idaho
Location in Bannock County and the state of Idaho
Coordinates: 42°52′30.8″N 112°26′50.2″W / 42.875222°N 112.447278°W / 42.875222; -112.447278Coordinates: 42°52′30.8″N 112°26′50.2″W / 42.875222°N 112.447278°W / 42.875222; -112.447278
Country United States
State Idaho
Counties Bannock, Power
Government
 • Mayor Brian Blad
Area[1]
 • City 32.38 sq mi (83.86 km2)
 • Land 32.22 sq mi (83.45 km2)
 • Water 0.16 sq mi (0.41 km2)
Elevation 4,462 ft (1,360 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • City 54,255
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 54,777
 • Density 1,683.9/sq mi (650.2/km2)
 • Metro 90,656
Time zone Mountain Standard Time (MST) (UTC-7)
 • Summer (DST) Mountain Daylight Time (MDT) (UTC-6)
Area code(s) 208
FIPS code 16-64090
GNIS feature ID 0397053
Website pocatello.us

Pocatello (Listeni/ˈpkəˈtɛl/) is the county seat and largest city of Bannock County,[4] with a small portion on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation in neighboring Power County, in the southeastern part of the US state of Idaho. It is the principal city of the Pocatello metropolitan area, which encompasses all of Bannock and Power counties. As of the 2010 census the population of Pocatello was 54,255.[5]

Pocatello is the fifth largest city in the state, just behind Idaho Falls (population of 56,813). In 2007, Pocatello was ranked twentieth on Forbes list of Best Small Places for Business and Careers.[6] Pocatello is the home of Idaho State University and the manufacturing facility of ON Semiconductor. The city is at an elevation of 4,462 feet (1,360 m) above sea level and is served by the Pocatello Regional Airport.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 32.38 square miles (83.86 km2), of which, 32.22 square miles (83.45 km2) is land and 0.16 square miles (0.41 km2) is water.[1]

Climate[edit]

Pocatello experiences a semi-arid climate (Köppen BSk),[7] with winters that are moderately long and cold, and hot, dry summers.

Climate data for Pocatello Regional Airport, Idaho (1981–2010 normals, extremes 1939–present)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 60
(16)
65
(18)
75
(24)
86
(30)
97
(36)
103
(39)
104
(40)
104
(40)
98
(37)
91
(33)
75
(24)
64
(18)
104
(40)
Average high °F (°C) 32.6
(0.3)
37.5
(3.1)
48.8
(9.3)
58.3
(14.6)
67.8
(19.9)
77.8
(25.4)
87.8
(31)
87.1
(30.6)
75.8
(24.3)
61.0
(16.1)
44.5
(6.9)
32.8
(0.4)
59.32
(15.16)
Average low °F (°C) 16.0
(−8.9)
19.2
(−7.1)
27.1
(−2.7)
32.9
(0.5)
39.7
(4.3)
46.5
(8.1)
52.0
(11.1)
50.7
(10.4)
42.1
(5.6)
33.0
(0.6)
24.1
(−4.4)
16.1
(−8.8)
33.28
(0.73)
Record low °F (°C) −31
(−35)
−33
(−36)
−12
(−24)
12
(−11)
20
(−7)
28
(−2)
34
(1)
30
(−1)
19
(−7)
7
(−14)
−14
(−26)
−29
(−34)
−33
(−36)
Precipitation inches (mm) 0.99
(25.1)
0.97
(24.6)
1.26
(32)
1.15
(29.2)
1.46
(37.1)
0.99
(25.1)
0.64
(16.3)
0.61
(15.5)
0.84
(21.3)
0.87
(22.1)
1.11
(28.2)
1.24
(31.5)
12.13
(308.1)
Snowfall inches (cm) 8.8
(22.4)
7.1
(18)
5.4
(13.7)
3.2
(8.1)
0.8
(2)
trace 0
(0)
0
(0)
0.1
(0.3)
1.6
(4.1)
5.7
(14.5)
10.7
(27.2)
43.4
(110.2)
Avg. precipitation days (≥ 0.01 in) 11.4 9.8 9.7 9.0 9.5 6.6 4.4 4.5 4.9 6.2 9.3 11.3 96.6
Avg. snowy days (≥ 0.1 in) 9.9 7.2 5.1 2.9 0.7 0 0 0 0.1 1.0 5.3 10.0 42.2
Mean monthly sunshine hours 124.0 161.0 232.5 261.0 303.8 339.0 381.3 347.2 294.0 241.8 132.0 114.7 2,932.3
Source: NOAA,[8] HKO (sun only, 1961–1990),[9] The Weather Channel (Records) [10]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 1,659
1900 4,046 143.9%
1910 9,110 125.2%
1920 15,001 64.7%
1930 16,471 9.8%
1940 18,133 10.1%
1950 26,131 44.1%
1960 28,534 9.2%
1970 40,036 40.3%
1980 46,340 15.7%
1990 46,080 −0.6%
2000 51,466 11.7%
2010 54,255 5.4%
source:[11][12]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 54,255 people, 20,832 households, and 13,253 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,683.9 inhabitants per square mile (650.2 /km2). There were 22,404 housing units at an average density of 695.3 per square mile (268.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 90.5% White, 1.0% African American, 1.7% Native American, 1.6% Asian, 0.2% Pacific Islander, 2.3% from other races, and 2.8% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.2% of the population.

There were 20,832 households of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.2% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.4% were non-families. 27.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.10.

The median age in the city was 30.2 years. 25.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 14.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.4% were from 25 to 44; 21.8% were from 45 to 64; and 10.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.9% male and 50.1% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[13] of 2000, there were 51,466 people, 19,334 households, and 12,973 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,822.5 people per square mile (703.7/km²). There were 20,627 housing units at an average density of 730.4 per square mile (282.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 92.32% White, 0.72% African American, 1.35% Native American, 1.15% Asian, 0.20% Pacific Islander, 2.18% from other races, and 2.09% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.94% of the population. The top 5 ethnic groups in Pocatello are: English – 21%,[14] German – 16%, Irish – 9%, Danish – 4% and Swedish – 4%.

There were 19,334 households out of which 34.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.6% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.9% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.6% under the age of 18, 16.7% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 18.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 29 years. For every 100 females there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $34,326, and the median income for a family was $41,884. Males had a median income of $33,984 versus $22,962 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,425. About 10.7% of families and 15.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.9% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.

Religion[edit]

The religious affiliation is as follows:

History[edit]

Founded as an important stop on the first railroad in Idaho during the gold rush, the city later became an important center for agriculture. It is located along the Portneuf River where it emerges from the mountains onto the Snake River Plain, along the route of the Oregon Trail. The city is named after Chief Pocatello of the Shoshoni tribe, who granted the right-of-way for the railroad across the Fort Hall Indian Reservation. Ironically, Chief Pocatello did not use the name but preferred to be called Tondzaosha, a Shoshoni word meaning buffalo robe. The chief's daughter, Jeanette Lewis, believed the name Pocatello had no meaning.[15][16]

The section of the city along the Portneuf River was inhabited by the Shoshoni and Bannock peoples for several centuries before the arrival of Europeans in the early 19th century. In 1834, Nathaniel Jarvis Wyeth, a U.S. fur trader, established Fort Hall as a trading post north of the present location of the city. The post was later acquired by the Hudson's Bay Company and became an important stop on the Oregon Trail, a branch of which descended the Portneuf through the present-day location of the city. A replica of the Fort Hall trading post is now operated as a museum in southern Pocatello.

The discovery of gold in Idaho in 1860 brought the first large wave of U.S. settlers to the region. The Portneuf Valley became an important conduit for the transportation of goods and freight. In 1877, railroad magnate Jay Gould of the Union Pacific Railroad acquired and extended the Utah and Northern Railway, which had previously stopped at the Utah border, into Idaho through the Portneuf Canyon. "Pocatello Junction", as it was first called, was founded as a stop along this route during the gold rush. After the gold rush subsided, the region began to attract ranchers and farmers. By 1882, the first residences and commercial development appeared in Pocatello.

In 1948, the mayor of Pocatello, George Phillips, passed an ordinance making it illegal not to smile in Pocatello. The "Smile Ordinance" was passed tongue in cheek as a result of an exceptionally severe winter, which had dampened the spirit of city employees and citizens alike. Unintentionally, the ordinance was never repealed. On December 10, 1987, Pocatello was declared by the mayor the "U.S. Smile Capital." An event called Smile Days is held annually in Pocatello, including a smile contest, and "arrests" of non-smilers.[17]

Pocatello absorbed nearby Alameda in 1962 and briefly became the largest city in the state, ahead of Boise. Pocatello was the second largest city in the state (behind Boise) until the late 1990s, when rapid growth in the Treasure Valley of southwestern Idaho placed Nampa and Meridian ahead of Idaho Falls and Pocatello, which are now the state's fourth and fifth largest cities, respectively.

Government and infrastructure[edit]

Idaho Department of Correction operates the Pocatello Women's Correctional Center (PWCC) in Pocatello.[18]

The United States Postal Service operates the Pocatello,[19] Bannock,[20] and Gateway Station post offices.[21]

Education[edit]

Eastern Pocatello in 2009,
from Red Hill on the ISU campus

Idaho State University (ISU) is a public university operated by the state of Idaho. Originally an auxiliary campus of the University of Idaho and then a state college, it became the second university in the state in 1963. The ISU campus is in Pocatello, with outreach programs in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho Falls, Boise, and Twin Falls. The university's crown jewel is the 123,000-square-foot (11,400 m2) L.E. and Thelma E. Stephens Performing Arts Center, which occupies a prominent location overlooking Pocatello and the lower Portneuf River Valley. The center's three venues provide state-of-the-art performance space, including the Joseph C. and Cheryl H. Jensen Grand Concert Hall. Idaho State's athletics teams compete in the Big Sky Conference, the football and basketball teams play in Holt Arena.

Pocatello is a part of the Pocatello/Chubbuck School District. The district has three public high schools: Pocatello High School, Highland High School, and Century High School.

Feeding the high schools are three public middle schools, thirteen public elementary schools, two public charter schools, and various alternative and church-based private schools and academies.[citation needed]

Economy[edit]

Top employers[edit]

According to Pocatello's 2011 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[22] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Idaho State University 3,460
2 Pocatello/Chubbuck School District 1,640
3 Portneuf Medical Center 1,170
4 Heinz 800
5 City of Pocatello 690
6 ON Semiconductor 640
7 Convergys 600
8 Allstate Insurance 500
Union Pacific Railroad 470
9 Bannock County 410
10 Pocatello Regional Medical Center 360

Sports[edit]

Pocatello is home to Holt Arena, a multipurpose indoor stadium which opened in 1970 on the ISU campus. Known as the "Minidome" until 1988, Holt Arena was the home of the Real Dairy Bowl, a junior college football Bowl game. Holt Arena also plays host to the Simplot Games, the nation's largest indoor high school track-and-field meet.

The Pocatello Marathon and Half Marathon are held annually. Times from the course may be used to qualify for the Boston and New York marathons.[23]

Outdoor sports, both winter and summer, play an important role in the culture of Pocatello. Pebble Creek, Idaho is a ski resort located just south of Pocatello and offers world class skiing and snowboarding.[24]

In popular culture[edit]

In terms of popular film, Pocatello gained attention in the 1954 musical film A Star is Born, in which Judy Garland sang the song "Born in a Trunk" about being born in the "Princess Theatre in Pocatello, Idaho".[citation needed] Pocatello is mentioned as the hometown of Aaron Davis, a character played by Steve Sandvoss in the motion picture Latter Days.[citation needed] Part of the 2006 film Bonneville occurs in Pocatello and, although it was not filmed in Idaho, actress Kathy Bates attended an LDS Church in Pocatello to research her character.[citation needed] Portions of the movie Napoleon Dynamite were filmed in Pocatello.[25]

The Pocatello region is the setting for Ruth Ozeki's novel All Over Creation[26] and for Tom Spanbauer's Now Is the Hour.[citation needed]

Pocatello is mentioned in John Fogerty's song "Somebody Help Me," from the REVIVAL album (2007).[citation needed]

Notable people[edit]

Sister cities[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-18. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-03. 
  4. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  5. ^ U.S. Census Bureau Delivers Idaho's 2010 Census Population Totals, Including First Look at Race and Hispanic Origin Data for Legislative Redistricting Accessed March 17, 2011
  6. ^ "Best Small Places For Business And Careers". Forbes. April 5, 2007. 
  7. ^ Peel, M. C., Finlayson, B. L., and McMahon, T. A.: Updated world map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 1633–1644, 2007.
  8. ^ "NowData – NOAA Online Weather Data". National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Retrieved 2014-03-09. 
  9. ^ "Climatological Normals of Pocatello". Hong Kong Observatory. Retrieved January 15, 2011. 
  10. ^ "Monthly Averages for Pocatello, ID". The Weather Channel. Retrieved January 15, 2011. 
  11. ^ Moffatt, Riley. Population History of Western U.S. Cities & Towns, 1850–1990. Lanham: Scarecrow, 1996, 97.
  12. ^ "Subcounty population estimates: Idaho 2000–2007" (CSV). United States Census Bureau, Population Division. March 18, 2009. Retrieved May 9, 2009. 
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  14. ^ http://www.epodunk.com/cgi-bin/genealogyInfo.php?locIndex=7043 Pocatello – Ancestry & family history – ePodunk]
  15. ^ Information provided by Sven Liljeblad (1984). "Pocatello's (Shoshoni) Band". Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series (Boise, Idaho: Idaho State Historical Society) (818). Retrieved November 10, 2013. 
  16. ^ In 1966, Sven Liljeblad suggested that the name Pocatello was not even a Shoshoni word. "The Name Pocatello". Idaho State Historical Society Reference Series (Boise, Idaho: Idaho State Historical Society) (37). May 1966. Retrieved November 10, 2013. 
  17. ^ "The U.S. Smile Capital". City of Pocatello. Retrieved 2014-08-09. 
  18. ^ "Static Printable Map of Pocatello & Chubbuck." City of Pocatello. Retrieved on June 4, 2011.
  19. ^ "Post Office™ Location – POCATELLO." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on June 3, 2011.
  20. ^ "Post Office™ Location – BANNOCK." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on June 3, 2011.
  21. ^ "Post Office™ Location – GATEWAY STATION." United States Postal Service. Retrieved on June 3, 2011.
  22. ^ City of Pocatello CAFR
  23. ^ http://www.pocatellomarathon.com/
  24. ^ http://www.pebblecreekskiarea.com/index.html
  25. ^ Erin Gloria Ryan (18 April 2012). "The Ten Scariest Places to Have Ladyparts in America". Jezabel. Jezabel. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  26. ^ Ruth Ozeki. "Description of Ruth Ozeki's novel All Over Creation.". Retrieved December 22, 2008. 
  27. ^ "Benedicte Wrensted: An Idaho Photographer in Focus". Retrieved October 6, 2010.
  28. ^ http://idahoathletichalloffame.org/Members/Bio.aspx?MemberID=54
  29. ^ a b "Pocatello, Idaho". Sister Cities International. Retrieved 19 April 2014. 

External links[edit]