Todd-AO

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Todd-AO
Industry post-production, broadcast media
Owner(s) Todd Soundelux
Website www.toddao.com

Todd-AO is a post-production company founded in 1953, providing sound-related services to the motion picture and television industries. The company operates three facilities in the Los Angeles area. Todd-AO is also the name of the widescreen, 70 mm film format that was developed by Mike Todd and the American Optical Company in the mid-1950s. Todd-AO was originally founded to promote and distribute this system.

History[edit]

Todd-AO began as a high resolution widescreen film format. It was co-developed in the early 1950s by Mike Todd, a Broadway producer, in partnership with the American Optical Company in Buffalo, New York. It was developed to provide a high definition single camera widescreen process to compete with Cinerama. Or as characterized by its creator, "Cinerama outta one hole". Where Cinerama used a complicated setup of three separate strips of film simultaneously, Todd-AO required only a single camera and lens.

The company's focus began to shift after Mike Todd's sudden death in an airplane accident in 1958. The 70 mm Todd-AO process was adopted by Panavision, Cinerama and others. As the production and exhibition markets became saturated with Todd-AO System hardware, the focus of the company gradually began to narrow down to the audio post-production side of the business, and Todd-AO became an independent sound mixing facility for commercial motion picture films and television after acquiring Glen Glenn Sound in 1986.

In May 2014, Todd-AO's parent company, Todd Soundelux, filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection.[1] As part of the bankruptcy proceedings, they closed their Hollywood and Santa Monica facilities, leaving only their Burbank location operational.[2]

Todd-AO process[edit]

Figure 1. Todd-AO: 65 mm negative and 70 mm positive

While the 70 mm film width had been used before, most notably in the Fox Grandeur process in 1929–1930, earlier processes are not compatible with Todd-AO due to differences in frame dimensions, perforations and type of soundtrack. Todd-AO actually combined the idea of 65 mm photography with frames five perforations tall (also a process with a history extending back to the silent era) with 70 mm wide prints and the magnetic sound that first appeared with CinemaScope, although improved with six channels and much better fidelity. The 70 mm print adds 2.5 mm extra down each edge to accommodate some of the soundtracks. Thus the print actually carried 65 mm perforations and the 65 mm negative was contact printed directly to the 70 mm print stock, as the sprocket holes aligned.

Four lens options covered a 128, 64, 48 or 37 degree field of view. Films were shot on 65 mm negative and the images printed onto 70 mm print stock (5 mm larger to accommodate soundtracks) for projection. The aspect ratio of this format was 2.20:1.

The use of 65 mm photography and 70 mm printing became the standard adopted by others: Super Panavision 70 (essentially the Panavision company's version of Todd-AO) and Ultra Panavision 70 (the same mechanically, but with a slight 1.25:1 anamorphic squeeze to accommodate extremely wide aspect ratio images) are both 65/70 processes.

The IMAX format also uses 65 mm camera and lab film to create 70 mm prints for projection (aka, the 65/70 mm process); conforming to the pitch and perforation standard for 70 mm film that was established by Todd-AO in the mid-1950s: the IMAX frame is 15-perfs long and runs horizontally through the projector, whereas the Todd-AO frame is only 5-perfs high and runs vertically through the projector.[3]

The Soviet film industry also copied Todd-AO with their own Sovscope 70 process, identical, except that both the camera and print stock were 70 mm wide.

The original version of the Todd-AO process used a frame rate of 30 frames per second, faster than the 24 frames per second that was (and is) the standard. The difference does not seem great, but the sensitivity of the human eye to flickering declines steeply with frame rate and the small adjustment gave the film noticeably less flicker, and made it steadier and smoother than standard processes. The original system generated an image that was "almost twice as intense as any ever seen onscreen before, and so hot that the film has to be cooled as it passes through the Todd-AO projector."[4]

Only the first two Todd-AO films, Oklahoma! and Around the World in Eighty Days employed 30 frames per second photography. Because of the need for conventional versions at 24 frames per second, every scene of the former film was shot twice in succession: once in Todd-AO and once in 35 mm CinemaScope. The later film was shot with two 65 mm Todd-AO cameras simultaneously, the speed of the second camera was 24 frames per second for wide release as optical reduction prints. All subsequent Todd-AO films were shot at 24 frames per second on a 65 mm negative and optically printed to 35 mm film as needed for standard distribution.[5] In all, around 16 feature films were shot in Todd-AO.

Todd-AO was developed and tested in Buffalo, New York at the Regent Theatre. Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II went there to see Todd-AO test footage, which led them to approve its use for Oklahoma!. Ampex Corporation engineers were in charge of developing the Todd-AO sound system. Ampex would later go on to manufacture the sound system, including selectable 4-track composite (CinemaScope) or six-track composite (Todd-AO) or four-track interlocked or six-track interlocked or optical sound sources.

The Todd-AO Company also offered a 35 mm anamorphic process technically similar to 35 mm Panavision or CinemaScope. This may cause some confusion if a Todd-AO credit (not necessarily the more specific Todd-AO 35 credit) appears in some widescreen films made in the 1970s and 1980s. It becomes even more confusing as 70 mm prints were made for films which, unlike earlier pictures made in the process, were shown in multiplexes, like Dune and Logan's Run.

During the late 1970s through the early 1990s 65 mm photography such as that used in processes like Todd-AO or Super Panavision became rare. However, some major films had 70 mm prints made by blowup from 35 mm negatives mostly for the benefit of six-track sound. These prints would typically play only in a few theatres in a few large cities while everyone else viewed the film in 35 mm. The advent of multichannel digital sound in the 1990s obviated these very expensive prints. "Blow-up" 70 mm prints also followed the Todd-AO layout, although in the case of films made with a 1.85:1 aspect ratio, it was retained in the 70 mm version, with the sides of the 70 mm frame left black.

Curved screen vs. flat[edit]

While Todd-AO was intended to be "Cinerama out of one hole", the extreme wide angle photography and projection onto a very deeply curved screen (which is what that would imply) saw little use. Most Todd-AO theatre installations had only moderately curved screens and the extreme wide angle camera lenses were used only on a few shots here and there. Todd-AO films made after 1958 used a conventional flat widescreen, and resembled ordinary films, except for their greater clarity and six-track stereo sound. A variation on Todd-AO called Dimension 150 did, however, make use of Cinerama-like deeply curved screens. Only two films were made in Dimension 150 – The Bible: In the Beginning, directed by John Huston, and Patton, starring George C. Scott. In some venues, however, Todd-AO and Dimension 150 films received their first run in Cinerama theatres in order that they be shown on a deeply curved screen – such as the first Atlanta, Georgia showings of The Sound of Music.[6]

Todd-AO and roadshows[edit]

Todd-AO films were closely associated with what was called roadshow exhibition. At the time, before multiplex theatres became common, most films opened at a large single screen theatre in the downtown area of each large city before eventually moving on to neighborhood theatres. With the roadshow concept, a film would play, often in 70 mm at a movie palace downtown theatre exclusively, sometimes for a year or more. Often a "hard ticket" policy was in effect, with tickets sold for specific numbered seats, and limited showings per day. Most Todd-AO films through the late 1960s, including Those Magnificent Men in Their Flying Machines and The Sound of Music, were initially shown on a roadshow basis.

In some US cities, individual theaters were converted for use in the 1950s as dedicated Todd-AO "Cinestage" showplaces. These theaters showed exclusive roadshow engagements of Todd-AO and other 70 mm films on large, deeply curved screens. They included the Rivoli Theatre in New York City,[7] the Cinestage Theatre in Chicago,[8] and Hunt's Cinestage Theatre in Columbus, Ohio.[9]

The roadshow era ended in the early 1970s, although a very few films (among them Gandhi) were shown in roadshow format after that.

Todd-AO attempts 35 mm widescreen[edit]

In the 1970s, under the leadership of Dr. Richard Vetter, Todd-AO made an attempt to compete with Panavision in the 35 mm motion picture camera rental market. The company built a series of anamorphic lenses in the 2.35:1 scope format, and owned several camera bodies (Mitchell and Arriflex) that they would provide with the lens package. Of the five original Planet of the Apes films, Conquest of the Planet of the Apes is the only entry filmed in Todd-AO 35 using Arriflex ARRI 35IIC cameras with lenses provided by The Carl Zeiss Group, (the other Apes pictures were filmed in Panavision).

By the 1980s the venture was moribund, and was abandoned. Eventually all of the Todd-AO cameras and lenses, both 35 mm and 65 mm (70 mm), were sold to Cinema Products in Los Angeles. Cinema Products is now defunct.

Timeline[edit]

  • 1953: Mike Todd and the American Optical Company formed as a joint venture called Todd-AO for the purpose of developing and distributing a large film format presentation system which incorporates a wide, curved screen with multi-channel sound.
  • 1955 & 56: Mike Todd produced two films which featured the new Todd-AO system.
  • 1958: Mike Todd was killed in a plane crash.
  • 1960s and 1970s: Although several blockbuster films were produced using the Todd-AO or Panavision versions of the 5-perf 70 mm format, market penetration of the Todd-AO system lost momentum, and was overtaken by the development of IMAX in the 1970s.
  • 1986: Acquired Glen Glenn Sound.
  • 1994: Acquired Film-Video Masters, Inc.
  • 1999: Todd-AO was acquired by Liberty Media Group and became part of its Liberty Livewire entity.
  • 2002: Liberty Livewire was renamed Ascent Media Group.
  • 2005: Ascent Media Group was spun off from owner, Liberty Media, into Discovery Holding Company.
  • 2007: Discovery Holding Company announced a restructuring plan where it intended to spin off its interest in Ascent Media and combine Discovery Communications with Advance/Newhouse Communications into a new holding company.[10] The reorganization was completed on September 17, 2008.
  • 2007: The Todd-AO Scoring Stage closed.[11]
  • 2008: What had previously existed as the "Creative Sound Services" division of Ascent Media Group was spun off from Discovery Holding Company to create CSS Studios, LLC, which became a wholly owned subsidiary of Discovery Communications. This transaction included the assets of Todd-AO, Soundelux, Sound One, POP Sound, Modern Music, Soundelux Design Music Group and The Hollywood Edge.[12]
  • 2012: CSS Studios, LLC was acquired by Empire InvestmentHoldings, which filed bankcruptcy for Todd Soundelux in May 2014.
  • 2014: In May 2014, Todd Soundelux filed for bankruptcy, closing their Hollywood and Santa Monica facilities.[2]

Films produced in 70 mm Todd-AO[edit]

The following films were produced in the 70 mm Todd-AO format. (This list does not include films photographed in Todd-AO 35 (see above)).

Awards[edit]

Feature film[edit]

Year Award Category Type Title Honorees
2013 BAFTA Award Best Sound Nominated Django Unchained Wylie Stateman, Michael Minkler, Tony Lamberti,
Mark Ulano
2009 Academy Award Best Sound Mixing Nominated Inglourious Basterds Michael Minkler, Tony Lamberti, Mark Ulano
2007 Academy Award Best Sound Mixing Won The Bourne Ultimatum Scott Millan, David Parker, Kirk Francis
2006 Academy Award Best Sound Mixing Won Dreamgirls Michael Minkler, Bob Beemer, Willie D. Burton
2006 BAFTA Award Best Sound Nominated Babel José Antonio García, Jon Taylor, Christian P. Minkler,
Martín Hernández
2006 BAFTA Award Best Sound Nominated Crash Richard Van Dyke, Sandy Gendler, Adam Jenkins,
Marc Fishman
2005 BAFTA Award Best Sound Nominated Collateral Elliott Koretz, Lee Orloff, Michael Minkler,
Myron Nettinga
2004 BAFTA Award Best Sound Nominated Kill Bill: Vol. 1 Michael Minkler, Myron Nettinga, Wylie Stateman, Mark Ulano
2003 BAFTA Award Best Sound Won Chicago Michael Minkler, Dominick Tavella, David Lee
2002 Academy Award Best Sound Won Chicago Michael Minkler, Dominick Tavella, David Lee
2002 BAFTA Award Best Sound Nominated Black Hawk Down Michael Minkler, Myron Nettinga, Chris Munro
2001 Academy Award Best Sound Won Black Hawk Down Michael Minkler, Myron Nettinga, Chris Munro
2000 Academy Award Best Sound Won Gladiator Scott Millan, Bob Beemer, Ken Weston
1998 Academy Award Best Sound Won Saving Private Ryan Gary Rydstrom, Tom Johnson, Gary Summers,
Ron Judkins
1997 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated L.A. Confidential Andy Nelson, Anna Behlmer, Kirk Francis
1996 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Evita Andy Nelson, Anna Behlmer, Ken Weston
1995 Academy Award Best Sound Won Apollo 13 Rick Dior, Steve Pederson, Scott Millan,
David MacMillan
1995 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Braveheart Andy Nelson, Scott Millan, Anna Behlmer,
Brian Simmons
1994 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Legends of the Fall Paul Massey, David Campbell, Christopher David,
Douglas Ganton
1994 Academy Award Best Sound Won Speed Gregg Landaker, Steve Maslow, Bob Beemer,
David MacMillan
1993 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Schindler's List Andy Nelson, Steve Pederson, Scott Millan,
Ron Judkins
1992 Academy Award Best Sound Won The Last of the Mohicans Chris Jenkins, Doug Hemphill, Mark Smith,
Simon Kaye
1990 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Dick Tracy Chris Jenkins, David E. Campbell,
D.M. Hemphill, Thomas Causey
1988 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Who Framed Roger Rabbit Robert Knudson, John Boyd, Don Digirolamo,
Tony Dawe
1987 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Empire of the Sun Robert Knudson, Don Digirolamo, John Boyd,
Tony Dawe
1985 Academy Award Best Sound Won Out of Africa Chris Jenkins, Gary Alexander, Larry Stensvold,
Peter Handford
1982 Academy Award Best Sound Won E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial Robert Knudson, Robert Glass, Don Digirolamo,
Gene S. Cantamessa
1979 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated 1941 Robert Knudson, Robert Glass, Don MacDougall,
Gene S. Cantamessa
1978 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Hooper Robert Knudson, Robert Glass, Don MacDougall,
Jack Solomon
1977 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Sorcerer Robert Knudson, Robert Glass, Richard Tyler,
Jean-Louis Ducarme
1977 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Close Encounters of the Third Kind Robert Knudson, Robert Glass, Don MacDougall,
Gene S. Cantamessa
1976 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated A Star is Born Robert Knudson, Dan Wallin, Robert Glass,
Tom Overton
1973 Academy Award Best Sound Won The Exorcist Robert Knudson, Chris Newman
1972 Academy Award Best Sound Won Cabaret Robert Knudson and David Hildyard
1965 Academy Award Best Sound Won The Sound of Music Fred Hynes
1963 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Cleopatra Fred Hynes
1961 Academy Award Best Sound Won West Side Story Fred Hynes
1960 Academy Award Best Sound Won The Alamo Fred Hynes
1959 Academy Award Best Sound Nominated Porgy and Bess Fred Hynes
1958 Academy Award Best Sound Won South Pacific Fred Hynes
1957 Academy Award Academy Scientific and Technical Award Won Todd-AO System Todd-AO Corp
Westrex Corp
1955 Academy Award Best Sound Recording Won Oklahoma Fred Hynes

Television[edit]

Year Award Category Type Title Honorees
2013 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One-Hour) Nominated Game Of Thrones: And Now His Watch Is Ended Mathew Waters, Onnalee Blank, Ronan Hill
2013 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated Game Of Thrones: And Now His Watch Is Ended Tim Kimmel, Paula Fairfield, Jed M. Dodge, Bradley C. Katona, David Klotz, Brett Voss, Jeffrey Wilhoit, James Moriana
2013 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One-Hour) Nominated Mad Men: The Flood Ken Teaney, Alec St. John, Peter Bentley
2013 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated Nikita: Aftermath George Haddad, Ruth Adelman, Chad J. Hughes,
Steve Papagiannis, Dale Chaloukian, Ashley Revell,
James M. Bailey
2013 CAS Award Sound Mixing - Television Series Nominated Game Of Thrones: Blackwater Onnalee Blank, Mathew Waters, Ronan Hill and Brett Voss
2013 CAS Award Sound Mixing - Television Series Nominated Mad Men: Commissions and Fees Ken Teaney, Alec St. John, Peter Bentley
2012 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Miami: Blown Away Timothy I. Kimmel, Brad Katona, Ruth Adelman, Todd Niesen, Skye Lewin, Joseph Sabella and James Bailey
2012 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Won Game Of Thrones: Blackwater Peter Brown, Kira Roessler, Tim Hands, Paul Aulicino, Stephen P. Robinson, Vanessa Lapato,
Brett Voss, James Moriana, Jeffrey Wilhoit and David Klotz
2012 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One-Hour) Won Game Of Thrones: Blackwater Mathew Waters, Onnalee Blank, Ronan Hill, Mervyn Moore
2012 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) and Animation Nominated Entourage: The End Tom Stasinis, Dennis Kirk, Todd Orr
2011 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) and Animation Won Family Guy: Road to the North Pole James F. Fitzpatrick and Patrick Clark
2011 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One-Hour) Nominated Mad Men: The Suitcase Ken Teaney, Todd Orr, Peter Bentley
2011 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated Nikita: Pandora George Haddad, Dale Chaloukian, Ruth Adelman, Chad J. Hughes, Ashley Revell, James Bailey and Joseph T. Sabella
2011 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: NY: Life Sentence Mark Relyea, Edmund Lachmann, David Barbee, Ruth Adelman, Kevin McCullough, Joshua Winget, Joseph T. Sabella and James M. Bailey
2010 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Won The Pacific: Part Two Michael Minkler, Daniel Leahy, Andrew Ramage
2010 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated The Pacific: Part Five Michael Minkler, Daniel Leahy, Craig Mann, Andrew Ramage
2010 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated 'The Pacific: Part Eight Michael Minkler, Daniel Leahy, Marc Fishman, Gary Wilkins
2010 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated The Pacific: Part Nine Michael Minkler, Daniel Leahy, and Gary Wilkins
2010 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) And Animation Won Entourage: One Car, Two Car, Red Car, Blue Car' Tom Stasinis CAS, Dennis Kirk, Alec St. John and Todd Orr
2010 CAS Award Sound Mixing - Television Series Won Mad Men: Guy Walks Into an Advertising Agency Ken Teaney, Todd Orr, Peter Bentley
2009 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) And Animation Won Entourage: Pie Tom Stasinis CAS, Dennis Kirk and Bill Jackson
2009 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Mascara Mace Matiosian, Ruth Adelman, Jivan Tahmizian, David Van Slyke, Joseph Sabella and James Bailey
2008 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Won John Adams: Don't Tread On Me Marc Fishman and Tony Lamberti
2008 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated John Adams: Join Or Die Michael Minkler and Bob Beemer
2008 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Fight Night Mace Matiosian, Ruth Adelman, Jivan Tahmizian, David Van Slyke, Chad Hughes, Joseph Sabella, Zane Bruce
2008 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) and Animation Nominated Entourage: Adios Amigo Dennis Kirk and Bill Jackson
2007 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half-Hour) And Animation Won Entourage: One Day In The Valley Dennis Kirk and Mark Fleming
2007 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One-Hour) Won CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Living Doll Yuri Reese and Bill Smith
2007 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy or Drama Series (One-Hour) Nominated The Sopranos: Stage 5 Kevin Burns and Todd Orr
2007 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Miami: No Man's Land Tim Kimmel, Ruth Adelman, Todd Niesen, Bradley C. Katona, Skye Lewin, Zane Bruce, Joseph Sabella
2006 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: A Bullet Runs Through It Yuri Reese and Bill Smith
2006 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: A Bullet Runs Through It: Part 1 Mace Matiosian, Ruth Adelman, Mark Allen, Zane Bruce, Troy Hardy, Joseph Sabella, Jivan Tahmizian, David Van Slyke
2005 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special Won The Life and Death of Peter Sellers Anna MacKenzie, Victoria Brazier, Felicity Cottrell, Zack Davis, Richard Ford, Tim Hands, Laura Lovejoy, James Mather, Geoff Rubay, Ruth Sullivan
2005 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Miami: Lost Son Ruth Adelman, Zane Bruce, Ann Hadsell, Bradley C. Katona, Skye Lewin, Todd Nieson, Joseph Sabella
2005 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Down the Drain Mace Matiosian, Ruth Adelman, Zane Bruce, Christine Luethje, Todd Nieson, Joseph Sabella, Jivan Tahmizian, David Van Slyke
2005 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Down the Drain Yuri Reese and Bill Smith
2005 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Won Warm Springs Adam Jenkins and Rick Ash
2005 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated The Life and Death of Peter Sellers Adam Jenkins and Rick Ash
2005 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated Lackawanna Blues Adam Jenkins and Rick Ash
2004 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special Nominated And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself Tony Lamberti, Zack Davis, Lou Kleinman, Michael Lyle, Carey Milbradt, Allan K. Rosen, Geoffrey G. Rubay, Bruce Tanis, Karen Vassar, Nicholas Viterelli, Dave Williams, Joshua Winget
2004 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Grissom vs. The Volcano Yuri Reese and Bill Smith
2004 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series Nominated The Sopranos: Irregular Around The Margins Todd Orr and Kevin Burns
2004 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated Traffic: Part 1 Marc Fishman, Tony Lamberti, Kevin Burns
2004 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated Something the Lord Made Adam Jenkins and Rick Ash
2003 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Won CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Fight Night Mace Matiosian, Ruth Adelman, Zane Bruce, Sheri Ozeki, Joseph Sabella, Jivan Tahmizian, David Van Slyke
2003 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Revenge Is Best Served Cold" Yuri Reese and Bill Smith]]
2003 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series Nominated The Sopranos: Whoever Did This Todd Orr and Kevin Burns
2003 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Won Live From Baghdad Adam Jenkins, Rick Ash, Drew Webster
2003 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated The Music Man Todd Orr and Kevin Burns
2003 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated A Painted House Todd Orr and Kevin Burns
2002 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Chasing the Bus Mace Matiosian, Ruth Adelman, Zane Bruce, Sheri Ozeki, Joe Sabella, Jivan Tahmizian, David Van Slyke
2002 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: Another Toothpick Yuri Reese and Bill Smith
2002 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated Band of Brothers: Carentan Todd Orr and Kevin Burns
2001 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated CSI: Crime Scene Investigation: 35K OBO Mace Matiosian, Ruth Adelman, Zane Bruce,
Stan Jones, Joe Sabella, Jivan Tahmizian,
David Van Slyke
2001 Emmy Award Outstanding Single-Camera Sound Mixing for a Series Nominated The Sopranos: D-Girl Todd Orr, Kevin Burns, Fred Tator
2001 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated South Pacific Rick Ash, Joe Earle, Joel Moss
2001 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated Dirty Pictures Todd Orr, Kevin Burns, Tom Perry
2000 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated The Others: Eyes Mace Matiosian, Harry Cohen, Ruth Adelman, Mike Broomberg, Zane Bruce, Diane Griffen, Jivan Tahmizian and Guy Tsujimoto
2000 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Series Nominated The Sopranos: D-Girl Todd Orr, Kevin Burns, Tom Perry
1999 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated Buffy The Vampire Slayer: Lover's Walk Anna MacKenzie, Mike Marchain, William Angarola, Fernand Bos, Zane Bruce, Mark Cleary, Robert Guastini, Rick Hinson, Cindy Rabideau, Joe Sabella and Ray Spiess, Jr.
1999 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated The Sopranos: I Dream Of Jeannie Cusamano Anna MacKenzie, Mike Marchain, William Angarola, Benjamin Beardwood, Zane Bruce, Mark, Kathryn Dayak, Robert Guastini, Rick Hinson, Cindy Rabideau, Joe Sabella, Ray Spiess, Jr. and Bruce Swanson
1999 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Series Nominated The Sopranos: A Hit Is A Hit Todd Orr, Ron Evans, Adam Sawelson
1999 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special Nominated A Soldier's Sweetheart Anna MacKenzie, Mike Marchain, William Angarola, Ron Finn, Robert Guastini, Rick Hinson, Jason Lezama, Chris Moriana, Cindy Rabideau, Catherine Rose, Raymond Spiess III and Ray Spiess Jr.
1999 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special Nominated Houdini Anna MacKenzie, Mike Marchain, Skip Adams, William Angarola, Zane Bruce, Robert Guastini, Rick Hinson, Cindy Rabideau, Joe Sabella, Ray Spiess, Jr. and Jeanette Surga
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Nominated The Visitor: Pilot Anna MacKenzie, William Angarola, Michael Broomberg, Mark J. Cleary, Robert Guastini, Rick Hinson, Jimmy Moriana, Cindy Rabideau, Jay Richardson, Raymond Spiess III, Ray Spiess Jr.
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Miniseries or a Movie Nominated A Lesson Before Dying Rich Ash and Gary Alexander
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Special Nominated Creature Anna MacKenzie, Mike Marchain, William Angarola, Steve Bissinger, Mark J. Cleary, Robert Guastini, Ellen Heuer, Rick Hinson, Jason Lezama, Aaron Martin, Craig Ng, Cindy Rabideau, Raymond Spiess III, Ray Spiess Jr.
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Miniseries or a Movie Won 12 Angry Men Adam Jenkins and David E. Fluhr
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Miniseries or a Movie Nominated From The Earth To The Moon: Le Voyage Dans La Lune Todd Orr and Kevin Burns
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Miniseries or a Movie Nominated From The Earth To The Moon: 1968 Scott Millan and Brad Sherman
1998 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Miniseries or a Movie Nominated From The Earth To The Moon: That's All There Is Rich Ash and Adam Sawelson
1997 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Miniseries or a Special Won Titanic Adam Jenkins, Don Digirolamo, Davide E. Fluhr
1997 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Drama Miniseries or a Special Nominated Apollo 11 Todd Orr, Kevin Burns, Jon Taylor
1997 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing Won Flipper Jon Taylor, Kevin Burns and Todd Orr
1996 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing Won Flipper Kevin Burns, Jon Taylor and Chris Minkler
1993 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special Won Doogie Howser, M.D.: Doogie Got a Gun Joe Kenworthy, Mike Getlin, Dean Okrand and Bill Thiederman
1992 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special Won Doogie Howser, M.D.: Lonesome Doog Joe Kenworthy, Bill Thiederman, Dean Okrand and Mike Getlin
1992 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Won Law & Order: Heaven David Hankins, Frank A. Fuller Jr., Peter Bergren, David A. Cohen, Richard Thomas, Barbara Issak, James Hebenstreit, Albert Edmund Lord III and Barbara Schechter
1991 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Mixing for a Comedy Series or a Special Won Doogie Howser, M.D.: Doogenstein Joe Kenworthy, Dean Okrand, Bill Thiederman and Mike Getlin
1987 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Miniseries or a Special Won Unnatural Causes Vince Gutierrez, William H. Angarola, Clark Conrad, Doug Gray, Mace Matiosian,Anthony Mazzei, Michael J. Mitchell, Matt Sawelson, Edward F. Suski, Dan Carlin Sr., James Wolvington, Barbara Issak and Jon Johnson
1987 Emmy Award Outstanding Sound Editing for a Series Won Max Headroom: Blipverts Doug Grindstaff, Richard Corwin, Clark Conrad, Brad Sherman, Richard Taylor, James Wolvington and Dick Bernstein
1985 Emmy Award Outstanding Live And Tape Sound Mixing And Sound Effects For A Series Won Cheers: The Executive's Executioner Doug Gray, Michael Ballin, Thomas J. Huth and Sam Black
1985 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Mixing For A Limited Series Or A Special Won Space: Part 5 Clark King, David J. Hudson, Mel Metcalfe and Terry Porter
1985 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Mixing For A Series Won Cagney & Lacey: Heat Maury Harris, John Asman, Bill Nicholson and Ken S. Polk
1984 Emmy Award Outstanding Live and Tape Sound Mixin and Sound Effects for a Series Won Real People: Hawaii Show - Sarah's Wedding Mark Hanes, Stu Fox, Dean Okrand and Edward F. Suski
1984 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Mixing for a Limited Series or a Special Won A Streetcar Named Desire Richard Raguse, William L. McCaughey, Mel Metcalfe and Terry Porter
1983 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Mixing for a Limited Series or a Special Won The Scarlet and the Black John W. Mitchell, Gordon L. Day, Stan Wetzel and Howard Wilmarth
1983 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Editing for a Series Won Hill Street Blues: Stan the Man Sam Horta, Donald W. Ernst, Avram D. Gold, Eileen Horta, Constance A. Kazmer and Gary Krivacek
1982 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Mixing Won Hill Street Blues: Personal Foul Bill Marky, Robert W. Glass Jr., Bill Nicholson and Howard Wilmarth
1980 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Mixing Won The Ordeal of Dr. Mudd Ray Barons, David E. Campbell, Robert Pettis and John T. Reitz
1979 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Editing Won Friendly Fire Bill Wistrom
1970 Emmy Award Outstanding Film Sound Mixing Won Mission: Impossible Dominick Gaffey and Gordon L. Day

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Palank, Jacqueline (22 May 2014). "Soundelux Enters Bankruptcy, Seeks Cash". The Wall Street Journal. 
  2. ^ a b Frazer, Bryant (22 May 2014). "Todd-Soundelux Files for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy Protection, Shuttering Hollywood and Santa Monica Locations". Studio Daily. 
  3. ^ SMPTE Stardard 145:2004 For Motion-Picture Film (65-mm) — Perforated KS-Scope
  4. ^ "Cinema: The New Pictures". Time. October 29, 1956. Retrieved 2010-10-01. 
  5. ^ Kurtti, Jeff (1996). The great movie musical trivia book (1. print. ed.). New York: Applause. p. 163. ISBN 9781557832221. Retrieved 6 January 2013. 
  6. ^ Cinema Treasures | Atlanta Theatre
  7. ^ "Rivoli Theatre". Cinema Treasures. Retrieved 2009-06-02. 
  8. ^ "Cinestage Theatre". Cinema Treasures. Retrieved 2009-06-02. 
  9. ^ "Hunt's Cinestage Theatre". Cinema Treasures. Retrieved 2009-06-02. 
  10. ^ http://money.cnn.com/news/newsfeeds/articles/newstex/AFX-0013-21647779.htm.  Missing or empty |title= (help)[dead link]
  11. ^ Burlingame, Jon (2007-08-22). "Todd-AO's fate could impact scoring". Variety. 
  12. ^ http://www.postmagazine.com/ME2/dirmod.asp?sid=&nm=&type=news&mod=News&mid=9A02E3B96F2A415ABC72CB5F516B4C10&tier=3&nid=9C0B951DFA8C48CA9DC5F40AFDAE6566

External links[edit]