Ghayn (Cyrillic)

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Not to be confused with غ (Ghayn), an Arabic letter.
Cyrillic letter Ghayn
Cyrillic letter Ghayn.svg
The Cyrillic script
Slavic letters
А Б В Г Ґ Д Ђ
Ѓ Е Ѐ Ё Є Ж З
Ѕ И Ѝ І Ї Й Ј
К Л Љ М Н Њ О
П Р С Т Ћ Ќ У
Ў Ф Х Ц Ч Џ Ш
Щ Ъ Ы Ь Э Ю Я
Non-Slavic letters
Ӑ А̄ А̊ А̃ Ӓ Ӓ̄ Ә
Ә́ Ә̃ Ӛ Ӕ Ғ Г̧ Г̑
Г̄ Ҕ Ӻ Ӷ Ԁ Ԃ
Ԫ Ԭ С́ Ӗ Е̄
Е̃ Ё̄ Є̈ Ӂ Җ Ӝ
Ԅ Ҙ Ӟ З́ Ԑ Ԑ̈ Ӡ
Ԇ Ӣ И̃ Ҋ Ӥ Қ Ӄ
Ҡ Ҟ Ҝ Ԟ Ԛ Ӆ Ԯ
Ԓ Ԡ Ԉ Ԕ Ӎ Ӊ Ң
Ԩ Ӈ Ҥ Ԣ Ԋ О̆ О̃
О̄ Ӧ Ө Ө̄ Ӫ Ҩ Ԥ
Ҧ Р̌ Ҏ Ԗ Ҫ Ԍ
Ҭ Ԏ У̃ Ӯ Ӱ
Ӱ́ Ӳ Ү Ү́ Ұ Х̑ Ҳ
Ӽ Ӿ Һ Һ̈ Ԧ Ҵ
Ҷ Ӵ Ӌ Ҹ
Ҽ Ҿ Ы̆ Ы̄ Ӹ Ҍ
Э̆ Э̄ Э̇ Ӭ Ӭ́ Ӭ̄ Ю̆
Ю̈ Ю̈́ Ю̄ Я̆ Я̄ Я̈ Ԙ
Ԝ Ӏ
Archaic letters
Ҁ Ѻ
ОУ Ѡ Ѽ Ѿ
Ѣ Ѥ Ѧ
Ѫ Ѩ Ѭ Ѯ
Ѱ Ѳ Ѵ Ѷ

Ghayn (Ғ ғ; italics: Ғ ғ) also known as Ge with stroke, or as Ayn (in Kazakh), is a letter of the Cyrillic script. In Unicode this letter is called "Ghe with stroke".[1]

It is used in the Bashkir, Karakalpak, Kazakh, Uzbek and Tajik languages, where it represents the voiced uvular fricative /ʁ/. Despite having a similar shape, it is not related to the Latin letter F (F f) or the Greek letter Digamma (Ϝ ϝ). In Kazakh and Tofa, this letter may also represent the voiced velar fricative /ɣ/. In Nivkh, ғ represents /ɣ/, while /ʁ/ is represented by ӻ, which looks like ғ with a hook. The Khakas language also uses ғ.

In earlier, Arabic-alphabet-based orthographies for some of these languages, the same sound was written with the letter ﻍ (ġayn/ghain).

Transliteration[edit]

The Cyrillic letter Ғ is most commonly romanized using the Latin letter Ğ, as in Azerbaijani and Kazakh. In Uzbek it is transliterated as ⟨gʻ⟩ and in Tajik, it is transliterated as ⟨ġ⟩, ⟨gh⟩, or ⟨ḡ⟩.

Computing codes[edit]

Character Ғ ғ
Unicode name CYRILLIC CAPITAL LETTER
GHE WITH STROKE
CYRILLIC SMALL LETTER
GHE WITH STROKE
Encodings decimal hex decimal hex
Unicode 1170 U+0492 1171 U+0493
UTF-8 210 146 D2 92 210 147 D2 93
Numeric character reference Ғ Ғ ғ ғ

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cyrillic: Range: 0400–04FF". pp 38–43 of The Unicode Standard, Version 6.0 (2010). p. 42. http://unicode.org/charts/PDF/U0400.pdf Accessed 2011-04-25.