633

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
633 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar633
DCXXXIII
Ab urbe condita1386
Armenian calendar82
ԹՎ ՁԲ
Assyrian calendar5383
Balinese saka calendar554–555
Bengali calendar40
Berber calendar1583
Buddhist calendar1177
Burmese calendar−5
Byzantine calendar6141–6142
Chinese calendar壬辰(Water Dragon)
3329 or 3269
    — to —
癸巳年 (Water Snake)
3330 or 3270
Coptic calendar349–350
Discordian calendar1799
Ethiopian calendar625–626
Hebrew calendar4393–4394
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat689–690
 - Shaka Samvat554–555
 - Kali Yuga3733–3734
Holocene calendar10633
Iranian calendar11–12
Islamic calendar11–12
Japanese calendarN/A
Javanese calendar523–524
Julian calendar633
DCXXXIII
Korean calendar2966
Minguo calendar1279 before ROC
民前1279年
Nanakshahi calendar−835
Seleucid era944/945 AG
Thai solar calendar1175–1176
Tibetan calendar阳水龙年
(male Water-Dragon)
759 or 378 or −394
    — to —
阴水蛇年
(female Water-Snake)
760 or 379 or −393
The Arab invasion of Khalid ibn al-Walid in Iraq

Year 633 (DCXXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 633 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Bede, Ecclesiastical History of the English People, Book III, Chapter I
  2. ^ Roberts, J: "History of the World." Penguin, 1994
  3. ^ Campaigns in Eastern Iraq, "Khalifa Abu Bakr", Companion of the Prophet. Virtual library of Witness-Pioneer.
  4. ^ Tabari: Vol. 2, p. 562
  5. ^ The Caliphate, Its Rise, Decline, and Fall. From Original Sourcesby William Muir, p. 56
  6. ^ Annals of the Early Caliphate by William Muir, p. 85
  7. ^ Thompson, E. A. (1969) "The Goths in Spain". Oxford: Clarendon Press
  8. ^ Bede, "Ecclesiastical History", Book II, Chapter 20