Al-Adiliyah Mosque

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Al-Adiliyah Mosque
جامع العادلية
Flickr - Eusebius@Commons - Al-Adiliyah mosque.jpg
Al-Adiliyah mosque
Al-Adiliyah Mosque is located in Ancient City of Aleppo
Al-Adiliyah Mosque
Location within Ancient City of Aleppo
Basic information
Location Syria Aleppo, Syria
Geographic coordinates 36°11′50.8″N 37°9′27.9″E / 36.197444°N 37.157750°E / 36.197444; 37.157750Coordinates: 36°11′50.8″N 37°9′27.9″E / 36.197444°N 37.157750°E / 36.197444; 37.157750
Affiliation Islam
Region Levant
Country Syria
Status Active
Architectural description
Architect(s) Mimar Sinan
Architectural type Mosque
Architectural style Ottoman architecture
Completed 1566
Specifications
Dome(s) 1
Minaret(s) 1
Materials Stone

Al-Adiliyah Mosque (Arabic: جامع العادلية‎‎, Turkish: Adliye Camii) or Dukaginzâde Mehmed Pasha mosque is a mosque complex in Aleppo, located to the southwest of the Citadel, in "Al-Jalloum" district of the ancient city, few meters away from Al-Saffahiyah mosque. The mosque was endowed by the Dukakinzade Mehmed Pasha in 1556. Dukakinzade was the Ottoman governor-general of Aleppo from 1551 until 1553 when he was appointed as governor-general of Egypt. He died in 1557 and the mosque was not completed until 1565-66 (AH 973).[1] It is considered to be one of the oldest mosques of the Ottoman period in Aleppo after the Khusruwiyah Mosque.

The complex is built at the southern entrance of the covered suq of ancient Aleppo.

The mosque became known as the Adiliyya because of its position near to the governor's palace, the Dar al-Adl, also known as the Dar al-Saada.[1][2]

The mosque has a large domed prayer hall preceded by a double portico. Above the windows on the north side and in the prayer hall are brightly coloured tiled lunette panels. These were probably imported from Iznik in Turkey.[3][2]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Necipoğlu 2005, p. 475.
  2. ^ a b Carswell 2006, p. 113.
  3. ^ Necipoğlu 2005, p. 477.

Sources[edit]

  • Carswell, John (2006) [1998]. Iznik Pottery. London: British Museum Press. ISBN 978-0-7141-2441-4. 
  • Necipoğlu, Gülru (2005). The Age of Sinan: Architectural Culture in the Ottoman Empire. London: Reaktion Books. ISBN 978-1-86189-253-9. 

External links[edit]