Armenia–Japan relations

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Armenian-Japanese relations
Map indicating locations of Armenia and Japan

Armenia

Japan

Armenia and Japan established diplomatic relations on September 7, 1992.

Armenia's President Robert Kocharyan paid an official visit to Japan on December 2001, holding meetings with Japan's Emperor and Prime Minister. He announced that the nation was planning to set up an embassy in Tokyo as soon as possible.[1] Armenia opened its Embassy in Tokyo on July 7, 2010. Japan has an embassy in Yerevan.

Armenian Genocide recognition[edit]

Although Armenia and Japan share a good relationship, due to the similarity between Japan and Turkey about war crimes in two World Wars (whereas both are on opposing sides, with the latter killing more people), Japan doesn't recognize the Armenian Genocide nor does it side with Turkey on the issue, and remaining neutral.

Monte Melkonian[edit]

Armenian national hero, Monte Melkonian, who later died in the Nagorno-Karabakh War, had studied in Japan before graduating from high school.[2] This was one of the few connections between Armenia and Japan, even though during Melkonian's time in Japan, Armenia still belonged to the Soviet Union.

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • Amirkhanyan, M. D., R. K. Karapetyan, and N. H. Hovhannisyan. Hayastan–Chaponia: kʻaghakʻakan, tntesakan, mshakutʻayin ev gitakan haraberutʻyunner / アルメニア・日本: 政治・経済・文化・科学的な交流 Arumenia/Nihon: Seiji, keizai, bunka, kagakuteki na kōryū / Armenia–Japan: Political, Economic, Cultural and Scientific Relations. Erevan: "Zangak-97", 2005. ISBN 99941-1-010-1.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Armenia's President met Japan's Emperor", PanArmenia.net, 20 December 2001. Accessed 2010-02-14.
  2. ^ Monte Melkonian and the way of the Samurai. http://hetq.am/eng/news/55766/monte-melkonian-and-the-way-of-the-samuraichanging-reality-through-struggle.html
  3. ^ The publication details of this book differ according to the OPAC. See the entries for this ISBN at Worldcat and also the entry[permanent dead link] for the library of the Institute of Developing Economies, JETRO. This appears to be an image of a Japanese-language cover.

External links[edit]