Emma Donoghue

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Emma Donoghue
Irish-Canadian author Emma Donoghue.JPG
Emma Donoghue in Toronto on February 18, 2015
Born (1969-10-24) 24 October 1969 (age 46)
Dublin, Ireland
Occupation novelist, short story writer, playwright, literary historian
Nationality Irish
Canadian[1]
Partner Christine Roulston
Children 2
Website
www.emmadonoghue.com

Emma Donoghue (born 24 October 1969) is an Irish-Canadian playwright, literary historian, novelist, and screenwriter. Her 2010 novel Room was a finalist for the Man Booker Prize[2] and an international best-seller. Donoghue's 1995 novel Hood won the Stonewall Book Award.[3] and Slammerkin (2000) won the Ferro-Grumley Award for Lesbian Fiction.[4] Room was adapted into a film of the same name, which Donoghue wrote the screenplay for, and she was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay.

Background[edit]

Donoghue was born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1969.[5] The youngest of eight children, she is the daughter of Frances (née Rutledge) and academic and literary critic Denis Donoghue.[1][5][6] She has a first-class honours Bachelor of Arts degree from University College Dublin (in English and French) and a PhD in English from Girton College, Cambridge. While at Cambridge she lived in a women's co-op, an experience which inspired her short story The Welcome.[7] Her thesis was on friendship between men and women in 18th century fiction.[8]

At Cambridge, she met her future life partner Christine Roulston, a Canadian who is now professor of French and Women's Studies at the University of Western Ontario. They moved permanently to Canada in 1998 and Donoghue became a Canadian citizen in 2004.[1] She lives in London, Ontario with Roulston and their two children, Finn and Una.[5][9]

Work[edit]

Donoghue's first novel was 1994's Stir Fry, a contemporary coming of age novel about a young Irish woman discovering her sexuality.[10] It was a finalist for the Lambda Literary Award in 1994.[7] This was followed in 1995 by Hood, another contemporary story, this time about an Irish woman coming to terms with the death of her girlfriend.[10] Hood won the 1997 American Library Association's Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Book Award for Literature (now known as the Stonewall Book Award for Literature).[7]

Slammerkin (2000) is a historical novel set in London and Wales. Inspired by an 18th-century newspaper story about a young servant who killed her employer and was executed, the protagonist is a prostitute who longs for fine clothes.[7][11] It was a finalist in the 2001 Irish Times Irish Literature Prize for Fiction and was awarded the 2002 Ferro-Grumley Award for Lesbian Fiction (despite a lack of lesbian content).[7][12][13] Her 2007 novel, Landing, portrays a long-distance relationship between a Canadian curator and an Irish flight attendant.[14]

The Sealed Letter (2008), another work of historical fiction, is based on the Codrington Affair, a scandalous divorce case that gripped Britain in 1864. The protagonist is Emily Faithfull.[15] The Sealed Letter was longlisted for the Giller Prize, and was joint winner, with Chandra Mayor's All the Pretty Girls, of the 2009 Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction.[citation needed]

On 27 July 2010, Donoghue's novel Room was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and on 7 September 2010 it made the shortlist.[2] On 2 November 2010, it was announced that Room had been awarded the Rogers Writers' Trust Fiction Prize.[16] Room was also shortlisted for the 2010 Governor General's Awards in Canada,[17] and was the winner of the Irish Book Award 2010. It was short-listed for the Orange Prize for Fiction 2011,[18] but lost out to Tea Obreht. She later wrote the screenplay for a film version of the book, Room (2015), for which she was nominated for an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Bafta Award.[19]

Her novel Frog Music, a historical fiction based on the true story of a murdered 19th century cross-dressing frog catcher, was published in 2014.

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • Stir Fry (1994)
  • Hood (1995)
  • Slammerkin (2000)
  • Life Mask (2004)
  • Landing (2007)
  • The Sealed Letter (2008)
  • Room (2010)
  • Frog Music (2014)

Short stories[edit]

Short story collections[edit]

  • Kissing the Witch (1997)
  • The Woman Who Gave Birth to Rabbits (2002)
  • Touchy Subjects (2006)
  • Three and a Half Deaths (2011)
  • Astray (2012)

Drama (stage)[edit]

  • I Know My Own Heart (1993) (published 2001)
  • Ladies and Gentlemen (1996) (published 1998)
  • Don't Die Wondering (2005)
  • Kissing the Witch (2000)
  • The Talk of the Town (2012)
  • Emma Donoghue: Selected Plays (published 2015)

Drama (radio)[edit]

  • Trespasses (1996)
  • Don't Die Wondering (2000)
  • Exes (2001)
  • Humans and Other Animals (2003)
  • Mix (2003)

Screenplays[edit]

  • Pluck (2001)
  • Room (2015)

Literary history[edit]

  • Passions Between Women: British Lesbian Culture 1668–1801 (1993)
  • We Are Michael Field (1998)
  • Inseparable: Desire Between Women in Literature (2010)

Works edited[edit]

  • What Sappho Would Have Said (1997)
  • The Mammoth Book Of Lesbian Short Stories (1999)

Further reading[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Stoffman, Judy (13 January 2007). "Writer has a deft touch with sexual identities". Toronto Star. Retrieved 5 October 2009. 
  2. ^ a b "News | The Man Booker Prizes". Themanbookerprize.com. Retrieved 2016-01-14. 
  3. ^ "Stonewall Book Awards List". American Library Association. 
  4. ^ "Awards". publishingtriangle.org. Publishing Triangle. Retrieved 2 October 2014. 
  5. ^ a b c "Emma Donoghue — Bio". Official site. Archived from the original on 24 March 2010. Retrieved 2 September 2008. 
  6. ^ "A to Z of Emma Donoghue, author". Picador.com. 2010-07-20. Retrieved 2016-01-14. 
  7. ^ a b c d e "Emma Donoghue — Writings". emmadonoghue.com. Retrieved 14 January 2016. 
  8. ^ Richards, Linda (November 2000). "Interview". January Magazine. Retrieved 5 October 2009. 
  9. ^ McEvoy, Marc. "Interview: Emma Donoghue". 
  10. ^ a b Keehnen, Owen (1994). "Future Perfect: Talking With Irish Lesbian Author Emma Donoghue". glbtq.com. Retrieved 5 October 2009. 
  11. ^ Hagestadt, Emma; Hirst, Christopher (8 May 2001). "Slammerkin by Emma Donoghue". The Independent. Retrieved 5 October 2009. 
  12. ^ Gonzalez, Alexander G. (2006). Irish women writers: an A-to-Z guide. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 98–101. ISBN 0-313-32883-8. 
  13. ^ O'Neill, Heather Aimee (12 January 2008). "Interview With Emma Donoghue". AfterEllen.com. Retrieved 5 October 2009. 
  14. ^ Brownrigg, Sylvia (22 July 2007). "In-Flight Moves". The New York Times. Retrieved 5 October 2009. 
  15. ^ Donoghue, Emma. "The Sealed Letter: Author's Note". Picador. Picador. Retrieved 21 November 2014. 
  16. ^ "The Writers' Trust of Canada - Prize History". Writerstrust.com. Retrieved 2016-01-14. 
  17. ^ "Emma Donoghue, Kathleen Winter make GG short list". The Globe and Mail, 13 October 2010.
  18. ^ "orange.com : site institutionnel d'Orange". Orangeprize.co.uk. Retrieved 2016-01-14. 
  19. ^ "Room - Awards - IMDb". www.imdb.com. Retrieved 2016-01-31. 

External links[edit]