Lancia Rally 037

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Lancia Rally 037
LanciaRally037.jpg
Category Group B
Constructor Lancia
Designer(s) Pininfarina
Predecessor Lancia Stratos
Successor Lancia Delta S4
Technical specifications
Chassis Polyester resin with glass fiber and flame retardant
Suspension (front) Independent wheels with two wishbones, coil springs, Bilstein gas shock absorbers and anti-roll bars
Suspension (rear) Independent wheels with two wishbones, coil springs, dual shock absorbers and no bars
Length 3,915 mm (154.1 in)[1]
Width 1,850 mm (72.8 in)[1]
Height 1,245 mm (49.0 in)[1]
Wheelbase 2,445 mm (96.3 in)[1]
Engine Lampredi 2.0–2.1-litre I4 supercharged, rear, mid-mounted
Transmission 5-speed manual
Weight 960 kg (2,116 lb)[1]
Tires Pirelli P7 Corsa
Competition history
Notable entrants Italy Martini Racing
Italy H.F. Grifone
Notable drivers Italy Attilio Bettega
Germany Walter Röhrl
Finland Markku Alen
Debut 1982 Monte Carlo Rally
RacesWinsPolesF.Laps
626N/AN/A
Constructors' Championships 1
Drivers' Championships 0

The Lancia Rally (Tipo 151, also known as the Lancia Rally 037, Lancia 037 or Lancia-Abarth #037 from its Abarth project code SE037) was a mid-engine sports car and rally car built by Lancia in the early 1980s to compete in the FIA Group B World Rally Championship. Driven by Markku Alén, Attilio Bettega, and Walter Röhrl, the car won Lancia the manufacturers' world championship in the 1983 season. It was the last rear-wheel drive car to win the WRC.

History[edit]

H.F. Grifone team's 037 at the Race Retro 2008.

In 1980 Lancia began the development of the 037 to comply with the then new FIA Group B regulations that allowed cars to race with relatively few homologation models being built. As the project name was number 037, this eventually became the name by which the car was known. Abarth, now a part of the Lancia-Fiat family, did most of the design work, even incorporating styling cues from some of its famous race cars of the 1950s and 1960s such as a double bubble roof line. The car was developed in collaboration between Pininfarina, Abarth, Dallara and the project manager, engineer Sergio Limone. Prior to its first participation in the 1982 World Rally Championship season, 200 road-going models were built to comply with Group B regulations.

The car made its competition debut at the 1982 Rally Costa Smeralda in Italy, where two cars were entered but both retired due to gearbox issues. The 1982 season was plagued with retirements for the 037, but the new car did manage to achieve several wins including its first win at the Pace Rally in the UK. The 1983 season was considerably more successful for the 037: Lancia took the 1983 World Rally Championship Constructors' title with Germany's Walter Röhrl and Finland's Markku Alen its principal drivers, despite serious competition from the 4WD Audi Quattro. Both drivers, however, missed the final round of the series, despite Röhrl maintaining a mathematical chance of the drivers' title: such honours instead went to Audi's veteran Finn, Hannu Mikkola.

Lancia 037 Evolution 2

For the 1984 Constructors' title defence, Lancia introduced an Evolution 2 version of the 037 with improved engine power output, but this was not enough to stem the tide of 4WD competition, losing to Audi in both 1984 championships, and again to the 4WD Peugeot 205 T16 in its final works season in 1985. Indeed, Alen collected the final 037 win, and the sole one for the E2 model, on the 1984 Tour De Corse, before it was finally pensioned off in the Martini sponsored Lancia factory rally car line-up in favour of its successor, the uniquely supercharged and turbocharged 4WD Delta S4, for the season-ending RAC Rally in Great Britain. Driver Attilio Bettega died in a 037 crash in 1985.

António Rodrigues won the 1984 Falperra International Hill Climb in a 037.

Specifications[edit]

The accessible user compartments opened
Engine

The Lancia 037 was a silhouette racer; while it was loosely based on the Lancia Montecarlo (also known as Scorpion in the US and Canadian markets) road car, they shared only the center section with all body panels and mechanical parts being significantly different. Steel subframes were used fore and aft of the 037's center section, while most of the body panels were made from Kevlar.

The mid-engined layout of the Montecarlo was retained, but the engine was turned 90 degrees from a transverse position to a longitudinal position. This allowed greater freedom in the design of the suspension while moving engine weight forward.[2]

An independent double wishbone suspension was used on both the front and rear axles, with dual shock absorbers in the rear in order to cope with the stresses of high speed off road driving. The 037 is notable in Group B as it retained the rear-wheel drive layout that was nearly universal for rally cars of the pre-Group B period; nearly all subsequent successful rally cars used four-wheel drive, making the 037 the last of its kind.

Unlike its predecessor, the V6-powered Lancia Stratos HF, the first 037s had a 2.0-litre 4-cylinder supercharged engine. Based on the long stroke twin cam engine which powered earlier Fiat Abarth 131 rally cars, the four valve head was carried over from the 131 Abarth but the original two carburetors were replaced by a single large Weber carburetor in early models and later with fuel injection. The 037 features a ZF transaxle.[1]

Lancia also chose a supercharger over a turbocharger to eliminate turbo lag and improve throttle response. Initially, power was quoted at 265 hp (198 kW) but was increased to 280 hp (209 kW). The final Evolution 2 model's engine generated 325 hp (242 kW) due to a displacement increase to 2,111 cc (2.1 L).

Detailed Specifications[edit]

Street car[edit]

1982 Lancia 037 Stradale at Paris - RM Auctions on February 4, 2015

Rally car[edit]

  • Body: Polyester resin reinforced with glass fibre and flame retardant
  • Weight: 960 kg (2,116 lb) in running condition
  • Dimensions: length 3,915 mm (154.1 in), width 1,850 mm (72.8 in), height 1,240 mm (48.8 in), wheelbase 2,445 mm (96.3 in)
  • Engine: mid-engine mounted longitudinally, 4 cylinders in line
  • Displacement: 1995 cm³, 2111 cm³ (Evolution 2 only)
  • Bore and Stroke: 84 mm (3.3 in) x 90 mm, 85 mm (3.3 in) x 93 mm (Evolution 2)
  • Maximum torque: 299 N⋅m (221 lb⋅ft) at 5,000 rpm, 333 N⋅m (246 lb⋅ft) at 5,500 rpm (Evolution 2)
  • Maximum power: 255–280 hp (190–209 kW) at 8,000 rpm, 310–325 hp (231–242 kW) (Evolution 2)
  • Supercharger: Abarth Volumex system with pressure between 0.60 and 0.90 bar (1 bar on the Evolution 2)
  • Lubrication: Forced dry sump oil tank 8 kg (18 lb)
  • Layout: Rear-wheel-drive
  • Distribution: Dual overhead cam shaft driven by belt, four valves per cylinder
  • Clutch: Single dry plate with sealing metal-Valeo, 230 mm (9.1 in) diameter with hydraulic foot pedal
  • Change: Five-speed plus reverse
  • Differential: ZF-Abarth type self-locking with two shafts fitted with CV joints
  • Front suspension: independent wheels with two wishbone, coil springs, Bilstein gas shock absorbers and anti roll bar
  • Rear Suspension: Identical to front but with dual shock absorbers and without bar
  • Wheels:

Gravel version: Front; Speedline 15-inch front alloy wheels, 205/50 Pirelli P7 Corsa tyres. Rear; 16-inch alloy wheels with 295/60/16 tyres; Asphalt version: 18-inch wheels at the rear and 16-inch wheels at the front

  • Steering: Rack and pinion with scaler
  • Brakes: Brembo-Abarth disc brakes on all four wheels with alloy calipers
  • Cooling: Forced with pump and radiator front
  • Ignition: Electronic inductive discharge Marelli AEI 200 A

Rally results[edit]

World Rally Championship for Manufacturers - results[edit]

Season Team Drivers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Pos Points
1982 Martini Racing MON SWE POR KEN FRA GRE NZL BRA FIN ITA CIV GBR 9 25
Finland Markku Alén 9 NF NF NF 4
Italy Attilio Bettega NF
Italy Adartico Vudafieri NF NF
Italy Fabrizio Tabaton NF
1983 Martini Racing MON SWE POR KEN FRA GRE NZL ARG FIN ITA CIV GBR 1 118
Germany Walter Röhrl 1 3 2 1 1 2
Finland Markku Alén 2 4 1 2 5 3 1
France Jean-Claude Andruet 8 NF
Italy Attilio Bettega 4 5 3 3
Italy Adartico Vudafieri 5 NF
Argentina Francisco Mayorga NF
Finland Pentti Airikkala 5
1984 Martini Racing MON SWE POR KEN FRA GRE NZL ARG FIN ITA CIV GBR 2 108
Finland Markku Alén 8 2 4 1 3 2 2 NF
Italy Attilio Bettega 5 3 7 4 2
France Jean-Claude Andruet NF
Finland Henri Toivonen NF NF 3
1985 Martini Racing MON SWE POR KEN FRA GRE NZL ARG FIN ITA CIV GBR 3 70
Finland Henri Toivonen 6 4 3
Finland Markku Alén NF NF 3 4
Italy Attilio Bettega NF NF
1986 Martini Lancia MON SWE POR KEN FRA GRE NZL ARG FIN CIV ITA GBR USA 2 122
Finland Markku Alén 3
Italy Miki Biasion NF
Kenya Greg Criticos 9
Kenya Johnny Hellier 10
Kenya Vic Preston Jr NF

Notes:

  • The Lancia Rally 037 was used during the Safari Rally 1986, instead of the regular Lancia Delta S4.

World Rally Championship - rally wins[edit]

No. Event Season Driver Co-driver
1 Monaco 51éme Rallye Automobile de Monte Carlo 1983 Germany Walter Röhrl Germany Christian Geistdörfer
2 France 27éme Tour de Corse 1983 Finland Markku Alén Finland Ilkka Kivimäki
3 Greece 30th Acropolis Rally 1983 Germany Walter Röhrl Germany Christian Geistdörfer
4 New Zealand 13th Sanyo Rally of New Zealand 1983 Germany Walter Röhrl Germany Christian Geistdörfer
5 Italy 25º Rallye Sanremo 1983 Finland Markku Alén Finland Ilkka Kivimäki
6 France 28éme Tour de Corse 1984 Finland Markku Alén Finland Ilkka Kivimäki

037 Stradale[edit]

Homologation requirements for the World Rally Championship's Group B mandated Lancia to produce at minimum 200 verifiable road-going examples in order to compete with the 037. 207 037 Stradale (Italian for "road") cars are known to have been produced from 1982 through 1984.[3][4] This road-going 037 variant was equipped with an Abarth-developed DOHC 2.0-litre (1,995 cc) 16-valve Inline-four engine, mated to an Abarth Volumex Roots-type supercharger generating 205 hp (153 kW) at 7,000 rpm.[5] It was capable of pushing the car to over 220 km/h (137 mph) and to 100 km/h (62 mph) from a standstill in 5.8 seconds.

Gallery[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Pelassa, Piergiorgio. (1992). 037 Ultimo Mito.
  • Cheetham, Craig. (2003). The World's Most Exotic Sports Cars: Super Cars. Motorbooks. ISBN 0-7603-1685-6.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Melisson, Wouter (2015-03-18). "Lancia 037 Rally". Retrieved 2018-10-13.
  2. ^ Peter Collins. Lancia 037: The Development & Rally History of a World Champion. pp. 18–19. ISBN 1-84584-076-3.
  3. ^ "RM Sotheby's - r229 1982 Lancia Rally 037 Stradale". RM Sotheby's. 2017-07-19. Retrieved 2018-04-09.
  4. ^ "SOLD | 1984 Lancia 037 Rally Group B Evo 2". Girardo & Co. Retrieved 2018-04-09.
  5. ^ "Bonhams : 1983 Lancia Rally 037 Stradale VIN. ZLA-151AR000000159". www.bonhams.com. Retrieved 2018-04-09.

External links[edit]