List of mammals of Florida

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Dolphin, state saltwater mammal;[1] Florida panther, state animal;[2] and manatee, state marine mammal[1]

This is a list of mammal species found in the wild in the American state of Florida. Ninety-nine species of mammals are known to inhabit, or have recently inhabited, the state and its surrounding waters. This includes a few species, such as the black-tailed jackrabbit and red deer, that were introduced after the arrival of Europeans. It also includes the extinct Caribbean monk seal and Florida black wolf. Rodents account for roughly one quarter of all species, followed closely by mammals from the families Cetacea and Carnivora.

The species included in this list are drawn from the work of the American Society of Mammalogists (ASM), which compiled information from five different publications.[3] Information on the international conservation status of species has been drawn from the IUCN Red List.

Chiroptera[edit]

Of the bats listed below, thirteen are confirmed to be resident species - all of them are insectivorous. Five species had very low numbers reported, and can be classified as accidental species: the Indiana bat, Jamaican fruit bat, little brown bat, northern long-eared myotis, and the silver-haired bat. Some bats not in this list, but with reported sightings in the Lower Keys, are the buffy flower bat, Cuban flower bat, and Cuban fig-eating bat.[4]

Bats can be classified in two groups by their roosting habits: solitary-roosting and colony-roosting bats.

Solitary bats prefer to live in leaves, palm fronds, and Spanish moss. Resident bats in this category are the eastern red bat, the northern yellow bat, and the Seminole bat. Hoary bats are not considered residents, because they migrate to Mexico and South America to spend the winter, but are considered a native species.[5]

The remaining species are considered to be colony-roosting bats. Darker than their solitary counterparts and less furry, these bats prefer to live under bridges, in tree holes or caves. Only three Florida species live in caves: the eastern pipistrelle, the gray bat and the southeastern myotis. Florida has the highest concentration of southeastern myotis in the world.[5]

The greatest threat to bats in Florida is the disturbance or destruction of roost sites, due to either vandalism or urban development.[5]

Common name Scientific name

authority

ASM state status and native range[3] Red list
Family Molossidae: Free-tailed bat
Florida bonneted bat

Florida bonneted bat (Eumops floridanus).jpg

Eumops floridanus
(Allen, 1932)
rare, endemic to southern Florida
Fl mammals vu.svg
[6]
Velvety free-tailed bat

Molossus molossus

Molossus molossus
(Pallas, 1766)
rare; Lower Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[7]
Mexican free-tailed bat

Tadarida brasiliensis

Tadarida brasiliensis
(I. Geoffroy, 1824)
common, statewide except for Keys

Fl mammals lc.svg[8]

Family Phyllostomidae: Leaf-nosed bats
Jamaican fruit bat

Artibeus jamaicensis

Artibeus jamaicensis
(Leach, 1821)
rare, Lower Keys only
Fl mammals lc.svg
[9]
Family Vespertilionidae: Vesper bats
Rafinesque's big-eared bat

Corynorhinus rafinesquii

Corynorhinus rafinesquii
Lesson, 1827
rare, statewide except southern tip of peninsula and Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[10]
Big brown bat

Eptesicus fuscus

Eptesicus fuscus
(Beauvois, 1796)
common statewide except for Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[11]
Silver-haired bat

Lasionycteris noctivagans

Lasionycteris noctivagans
(La Conte, 1831)
rare; known only from north Santa Rosa County and possibly north Nassau County
Fl mammals lc.svg
[12]
Eastern red bat

Lasiurus borealis

Lasiurus borealis
(Müller, 1776)
uncommon; panhandle and northern quarter of peninsula

Fl mammals lc.svg[13]

Hoary bat

Lasiurus cinereus

Lasiurus cinereus
(Beauvois, 1796)
uncommon, panhandle and northern half of peninsula
Fl mammals lc.svg
[14]
Northern yellow bat

Lasiurus intermedius

Lasiurus intermedius
H. Allen, 1862
common statewide except southern tip of peninsula and Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[15]
Seminole bat

Lasiurus seminolus

Lasiurus seminolus
(Rhoads, 1895)
common, statewide except southern tip of peninsula and Keys

Fl mammals lc.svg[16]

Southeastern myotis

Myotis austroriparius

Myotis austroriparius
(Rhoads, 1897)
common; cave habitats in panhandle and, disjunct, northeastern and northcentral peninsula
Fl mammals lc.svg
[17]
Gray bat

Myotis grisescens

Myotis griscens
A.H. Howell, 1909
rare, known only from panhandle, Marianna area
Fl mammals en.svg
[18]
Little brown bat

Myotis lucifugus

Myotis lucifugus
(La Conte, 1831)
rare, known only from panhandle and Okaloosa County
Fl mammals en.svg
[19]
Northern long-eared myotis

Myotis lucifugus

Myotis septentrionalis
(Trouessart, 1897)
rare, known only from panhandle, Marianna and Jackson counties
Fl mammals nt.svg
[20]
Indiana bat

Myotis sodalis

Myotis sodalis
Miller & Allen, 1922
rare, known only from panhandle, Marianna and Jackson counties
Fl mammals en.svg
[21]
Evening bat

Nycticeius humeralis

Nycticeius humeralis
(Rafinesque, 1818)
uncommon; panhandle and northern quarter of peninsula
Fl mammals lc.svg
[22]
Eastern pipistrelle

Perimyotis subflavus

Perimyotis subflavus
(F. Cuvier, 1832)
uncommon; panhandle and northern half of peninsula
Fl mammals vu.svg
[23]

Carnivorans[edit]

Florida panther

Coyotes arrived in northern Florida in the 1970s as their natural range expanded. Illegal releases were another factor in their occupation of the state. Coyotes are extremely adaptable, living in all types of forests and farms.[24]

Florida has two types of foxes. The native gray fox can be found in the United States almost anywhere, except the northern plains and Rockies. It is sometimes confused with the red fox due to having patches of red hair.[25] The red fox was introduced to Florida by hunting clubs, although it may have been native in the northern panhandle. Its preferred habitats are open areas, while the gray fox prefers woods.[26]

Red wolves were once common throughout the southeastern US, including Florida. Extinct in the wild in 1980, it has been progressively introduced to select nature preserves. The present population was introduced as part of this recovery program in 1997 to the Saint Vincent National Refuge;[27] once red wolf pups reach 18 months, they are relocated to the North Carolina portion of the program.[28]

Bobcats are well adapted to urban development and are not a conservation concern. They make their home in hammocks, forests or swamps.[29]

The Florida panther (Puma concolor coryi) is a subspecies of cougar. Its main differences from other subspecies are longer legs, smaller size and a shorter darker coat. The skull of the Florida panther is broader and flatter with highly arched nasal bones.[30] Reportedly only seventy adult animals are alive,[31] and a 1992 study estimated that the subspecies would become extinct between 2016 and 2055.[32] It was chosen in 1982 as the Florida state animal by the state's schoolchildren.[33]

Two of the eleven species of skunks live in Florida. Both the eastern spotted skunk and the striped skunk can be found statewide (except for the Keys).

Small populations of the Everglades mink (Mustela vison evergladensis), a subspecies of American mink, are encountered near Lake Okeechobee, and in the Big Cypress Swamp-Everglades National Park area.[34]

Northern river otters are a common sight close to freshwater streams in Florida. The population is increasing.[35]

Raccoons are prevalent in the contiguous 48 states, including Florida. Adaptable to almost all kinds of habitats, they are among the few which actually benefit from human development, since food becomes more available. Attacks by predators like the bobcat cause minimum mortality, and the main reason for raccoon deaths is considered to be car accidents.[36] They are predators of sea turtle nests.[37]

The Florida black bear, Ursus americanus floridanus, is a subspecies of the American black bear. Differences between subspecies are very small; the Florida black bear has a highly arched forehead and a long and narrow braincase.[38] Estimates for 2002 indicated the number of bears statewide to be between 2,000 and 3,200, indicating an increase from the previous census in 1998. The biggest cause of concern is roadkill, although the rates of mortality are equivalent to other areas in the country.[39]

Florida does not have seal colonies, but stray seals come ashore in Florida occasionally. The most prevalent of those have been the common seal and the hooded seal, although a bearded seal was seen in 2007.[40] The Caribbean monk seal was native to the Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico. Once a popular prey for Bahamas fishermen, their numbers diminished greatly in the 1800s. The last sighting of the species in Florida was in 1922, and specimens have not been seen anywhere since 1952.[41]

Common name Scientific name

authority

ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Felidae: Felines
Bobcat

Lynx rufus

Lynx rufus
(Schreber, 1777)
common; peninsula and northern Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
Florida panther

Puma concolor

Puma concolor
(Linnaeus, 1771)
endemic and rare; restricted to Green Swamp and Big Cypress areas in SW peninsula
Fl mammals cr.svg
[42]
Family Canidae: Canines
Coyote

Canis latrans

Canis latrans
Say, 1823
uncommon or locally common statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[43]
Gray wolf

Canis lupus

Canis lupus
Linnaeus, 1758
extirpated
Fl mammals lc.svg
Florida black wolf

Canis lupus floridanus

Canis lupus floridanus
Miller, 1912
extinct
Fl mammals ex.svg
Red wolf

Canis rufus

Canis lupus rufus
(Audubon & Bachman, 1851)
rare; introduced on St. Vincent Island, extirpated elsewhere
Fl mammals cr.svg
[44]
Gray fox

Urocyon cinereoargenteus

Urocyon cinereoargenteus
(Schreber, 1775)
uncommon or locally common statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[45]
Red fox

Vulpes vulpes fulvus

Vulpes vulpes
(Linnaeus, 1758)
uncommon or locally common statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[46]
Family Ursidae: Bears
Florida black bear

Ursus americanus floridanus

Ursus americanus floridanus
(Pallas, 1780)
rare or uncommon; localized populations statewide except Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[47]
Family Procyonidae: Raccoons and allies
Common raccoon

Procyon lotor

Procyon lotor
(Linnaeus, 1758)
abundant, statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[48]
Family Mustelidae: Mustelids
Northern river otter

Lontra canadensis

Lontra canadensis
(Schreber, 1777)
locally common, mostly freshwater habitats, primarily rivers and streams, statewide except Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[49]
Long-tailed weasel

Mustela frenata

Mustela frenata
(Lichtenstein, 1831)
rare; statewide except Everglades and Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[50]
Mink

Neovison vison

Neovison vison
(Schreber, 1777)
rare; coastal marshes in west Panhandle, Big Bend area, northeast area, and Everglades
Fl mammals lc.svg
[51]
Family Mephitidae: Skunks
Striped skunk

Mephitis mephitis

Mephitis mephitis
(Schreber, 1776)
common; statewide except Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[52]
Eastern spotted skunk

Spilogale putorius

Spilogale putorius
(Linnaeus, 1758)
common; statewide except northeast corner and Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[53]
Superfamily Pinnipedia: Pinnipeds
Family Otariidae: Eared seals
California sea lion

Zalophus californianus

Zalophus californianus
(Lesson, 1828)
introduced; accidental sightings had occurred in Florida's gulf coast of wandering individuals from Mobile Bay, Alabama[54]
Fl mammals lc.svg
Family Phocidae: Earless seals
Hooded seal

Cystophora cristata

Cystophora cristata
(Erxleben, 1777)
rare; east coastal marine areas to Central Florida
Fl mammals lc.svg
[55]
Bearded seal

Erignathus barbatus

Erignathus barbatus
(Erxleben, 1777)
rare; east coastal marine areas to Central Florida
Fl mammals lc.svg
[56]
Caribbean monk seal

Monachus tropicalis

Neomonachus tropicalis
(Erxleben, 1777)
extinct
Fl mammals ex.svg
[57]
Harbor seal

Phoca vitulina

Phoca vitulina
(Linnaeus, 1758)
rare; east coastal marine areas to Central Florida
Fl mammals lc.svg
[58]

Cetaceans[edit]

Common bottlenose dolphin in Boca Raton

Of the several whales seen close to Florida, the most frequent and notable visitor is the North Atlantic right whale. Named as such because they were the "right" whales to kill, their only known calving ground is located off the coasts of Georgia and Florida. Pregnant females migrate from feeding grounds located far north and deliver calves from mid-December to March.[59] Humpback whales are also re-colonizing the area while gray whales, once cavorting off Florida for the same reasons as the right whales, were extirpated from the Atlantic in the 17th and 18th centuries.[60]

The most common dolphin in the state is the common bottlenose dolphin. Dolphins, like manatees, are vulnerable to red tide and have mass fatalities when one occurs.[61] Dolphins were designated the Florida state saltwater mammal in 1975.[62]

Common name Scientific name

authority

ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Balaenidae: Right whales
North Atlantic right whale

Eubalaena glacialis

Eubalaena glacialis
(Linnaeus, 1758)
regular migrant (in very small number); marine areas
Fl mammals en.svg
[63]
Family Balaenopteridae: Rorquals
Common minke whale

Balaenoptera acutorostrata

Balaenoptera acutorostrata
Lacépède, 1804
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals lc.svg
[64]
Sei whale

Balaenoptera borealis

Balaenoptera borealis
(Lesson, 1828)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals en.svg
[65]
Bryde's whale

Balaenoptera brydei

Balaenoptera brydei
Anderson, 1878
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[66]
Blue whale

Balaenoptera musculus

Balaenoptera musculus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals en.svg
[67]
Fin whale

Balaenoptera physalus

Balaenoptera physalus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals en.svg
[68]
Humpback whale

Megaptera novaeangliae

Megaptera novaeangliae
(Borowski, 1781)
common (in small numbers); marine areas
Fl mammals lc.svg
[69]
Family Eschrichtiidae: Grey whales
Grey whale

Eschrichtius robustus

Eschrichtius robustus
(Lilljebor, 1861)
extirpated
Fl mammals lc.svg
[70]
Family Physeteridae: Sperm whales
Sperm whale

Physeter macrocephalus

Physeter macrocephalus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals vu.svg
[71]
Family Kogiidae: Dwarf sperm whales
Pygmy sperm whale

Kogia breviceps

Kogia breviceps
(Blainville, 1838)
uncommon; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[72]
Dwarf sperm whale

Kogia sima

Kogia sima
(Owen, 1866)
uncommon; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[73]
Family Ziphidae: Beaked whales
Blainville's beaked whale

Mesoplodon densirostris

Mesoplodon densirostris
(Blainville, 1817)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[74]
Gervais' beaked whale

Mesoplodon europaeus

Mesoplodon europaeus
(Gervais, 1855)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[75]
True's beaked whale

Mesoplodon mirus

Mesoplodon mirus
(True, 1913)
rare; Atlantic marine areas south to Flagler County.
Fl mammals dd.svg
[76]
Cuvier's beaked whale

Ziphius cavirostris

Ziphius cavirostris
(G. Cuvier, 1823)
rare; marine areas

Fl mammals dd.svg[77]

Family Delphinidae: Oceanic dolphins
Short-beaked common dolphin

Delphinus delphis

Delphinus delphis
(Gray, 1828)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals lc.svg
[78]
Pygmy killer whale

Feresa attenuata

Feresa attenuata
(Gray, 1875)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[79]
Short-finned pilot whale

Globicephala macrorhynchus

Globicephala macrorhynchus
Gray, 1846
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[80]
Risso's dolphin

Grampus griseus

Grampus griseus
(G. Cuvier, 1812)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[81]
Fraser's dolphin

Lagenodelphis hosei

Lagenodelphis hosei
(Fraser, 1956)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[82]
Killer whale

Orcinus orca

Orcinus orca
(Linnaeus, 1758)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[83]
Melon-headed whale

Peponocephala electra

Peponocephala electra
(Gray, 1846)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[84]
False killer whale

Pseudorca crassidens

Pseudorca crassidens
(Owen, 1846)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[85]
Pantropical spotted dolphin

Stenella attenuata

Stenella attenuata
(Gray, 1846)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[86]
Clymene dolphin

Stenella clymene

Stenella clymene
(Gray, 1846)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[87]
Striped dolphin

Stenella coeruleoalba

Stenella coeruleoalba
(Meyen, 1833)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals lc.svg
[88]
Atlantic spotted dolphin

Stenella frontalis

Stenella frontalis
(G. Cuvier, 1829)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[89]
Spinner dolphin

Stenella longirostris

Stenella longirostris
(Gray, 1828)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[90]
Rough-toothed dolphin

Steno bredanensis

Steno bredanensis
(G. Cuvier in Lesson, 1828)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
[91]
Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin

Tursiops aduncus

Tursiops aduncus
(Ehrenberg, 1833)
rare; marine areas
Fl mammals dd.svg
Common bottlenose dolphin

Tursiops truncatus

Tursiops truncatus
(Montagu, 1821)
common; coastal marine areas
Fl mammals lc.svg
[92]

Even-toed ungulates[edit]

Key deer

The only native even-toed ungulate is the white-tailed deer. It is the most economically important hunting mammal in all of North America, and is one of the major prey animals of the Florida panther. There were only about 20,000 deer in Florida during the late 1930s, and the species was almost extinct in South Florida due to a campaign to eliminate tick-borne diseases. Hunt restraining measures and purchases from other states were very successful bringing the population to more than 700,000 deer statewide. A smaller subspecies, the Key deer, lives only in the Keys and numbers around 800 animals.[93] Sambar deer were introduced in 1908 as alternative game for hunters on Saint Vincent Island. The population is between 700 and 1,000; 130 hunters are licensed per year, and each can kill up to two deer.[94] Some red deer were released from a hunting ranch around 1967 and may still exist as a small herd.[95]

Wild boar found their way to Florida in 1539 with Spanish colonist Hernando de Soto. Florida has 12% of the three million boars that roam in the US.[96] They are a popular hunting prey, but are regarded as a pest, due to the damage they inflict to agriculture and environment. More than 21,000 boar were killed in 1980 alone.[97]

Common name Scientific name
authority
ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Cervidae: Deer
Chital

Axis axis

Axis axis
(Erxleben, 1777)
introduced; uncommon
Fl mammals lc.svg
[98]
Elk

Cervus canadensis

Cervus canadensis introduced; single population in Highlands County.
Fl mammals lc.svg
[99]
White-tailed deer

Odocoileus virginianus

Odocoileus virginianus
(Zimmerman, 1780)
common statewide; rare in Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[100]
Key deer

O. v. clavium

O. v. clavium
Barbour & G. M. Allen, 1922
only in Everglades or Keys
Fl mammals en.svg
Barasingha

Rucervus duvaucelii

Rucervus duvaucelii
G. Cuvier, 1823
introduced[101]
Fl mammals vu.svg
[102]
Sambar deer

Rusa unicolor

Rusa unicolor
(Kerr, 1792)
introduced on St. Vincent Island
Fl mammals vu.svg
[103]
Family Bovidae: Bovids
American bison

Bison bison

Bison bison
(Linnaeus, 1758)
reintroduced on Payness Prairie Preserve
Fl mammals nt.svg
[104][105][106]
Family Suidae: Pigs
Wild boar

Sus scrofa

Sus scrofa
Linnaeus, 1758
introduced; common
Fl mammals lc.svg
[107]

Marsupials[edit]

The Virginia opossum is the only marsupial found in North America north of the Rio Grande. It lives in wooded areas and can be easily found statewide.

Common name
Scientific name
authority
ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Didelphidae: New World opossums
Virginia opossum

Didelphis virginiana

Didelphis virginiana
(Kerr, 1792)
common; statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[108]

Armadillos[edit]

Cingulata are represented by the nine-banded armadillo, having migrated from Texas. Subsequent introductions and fast breeding spread the species statewide.[97]

Common name
Scientific name
authority
ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Dasypodidae: Armadillos
Nine-banded armadillo

Dasypus novemcinctus

Dasypus novemcinctus
Linnaeus, 1758
common; statewide, except possibly some parts of Everglades
Fl mammals lc.svg
[109]

Primates[edit]

The rhesus macaque was introduced sometime in the 1930s and has flourished in central Florida. The original source of this population is a matter of debate, with one common belief being that they were brought for Tarzan movies being filmed in the area and either escaped from the set or were set free.[110] Charles River Laboratories, the world's biggest producer of lab animals, maintained a free-range colony until 1999, when they were forced to remove the animals after they destroyed parts of the mangrove forests in Key Haven.[111] Other primates with reported sightings not included in this list are crab-eating macaques and squirrel monkeys.[112]

Common name
Scientific name
authority
ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Cercopithecidae: Old World monkeys
Vervet monkey

Chlorocebus pygerythrus

Chlorocebus pygerythrus
(F. Cuvier, 1821)
introduced; Dania Beach and Fort Lauderdale area
Fl mammals nt.svg
[113]
Rhesus macaque

Macaca mulatta

Macaca mulatta
(Zimmermann, 1780)
introduced; Ocala and Silver Springs area
Fl mammals nt.svg
[114]

Lagomorphs[edit]

All the confirmed lagomorphs in Florida are nocturnal; the black-tailed jackrabbit—introduced as a training tool for racing greyhounds from 1930 to 1950; the native eastern cottontail, which can be found anywhere but in forests and coastal marshes; and the marsh rabbit, which prefers freshwater and brackish marshes. The subspecies Lower Keys marsh rabbit has the scientific name Sylvilagus palustris hefneri after Hugh Hefner—because research on the subspecies was financed in part by the Playboy Foundation.[115]

Common name Scientific name

authority

ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Leporidae: Rabbits and hares
Black-tailed jackrabbit

Lepus californicus

Lepus californicus
(Gray, 1837)
introduced; established in Homestead area
Fl mammals lc.svg
[116]
Swamp rabbit

Sylvilagus aquaticus

Sylvilagus aquaticus
(Bachman, 1837)
rare and unconfirmed; possibly present in Escambia County but no known records
Fl mammals lc.svg
[117]
Eastern cottontail

Sylvilagus floridanus

Sylvilagus floridanus
(J. A. Allen, 1890)
common; statewide except Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[118]
Marsh rabbit

Sylvilagus palustris

Sylvilagus palustris
(Bachman, 1837)
common; statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[119]
Lower Keys marsh rabbit

Lower Keys marsh rabbit.jpg

Sylvilagus palustris hefneri
(Lazell, 1984)
Florida Keys
Fl mammals en.svg

Rodents[edit]

Eastern gray squirrel in Tampa

Of the several species of rodents in Florida, the subspecies of oldfield mouse are the biggest conservation concern, along with the Florida mouse. Six of eight subspecies of the oldfield mouse (commonly named beach mice) are in endangered status, and one is extinct. Given causes for their demise is predators like cats and red foxes and destruction of their natural habitats.[120] The Florida mouse is on the endangered species list because of destruction of their habitat. The mouse is the only mammal that is endemic to Florida. The rodent depends on the gopher tortoise (also endangered) for its survival, because it makes its burrows from tortoise burrows, or in the absence of those, oldfield mouse burrows.[121]

Non-native species brought in boats by colonizers are the black rat, brown rat and house mouse. Other non-natives are the capybara, the nutria and the Mexican gray squirrel.[122]

Common name Scientific name

authority

ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Castoridae: Beavers
American beaver

Castor canadensis

Castor canadensis
(Kuhl, 1820)
common; panhandle and northern third of peninsula, except coastal areas.
Fl mammals lc.svg
[123]
Family Sciuridae: Squirrels
Southern flying squirrel

Glaucomys volans

Glaucomys volans
(Linnaeus, 1758)
common; statewide except Keys and possibly southwest peninsula
Fl mammals lc.svg
[124]
Mexican gray squirrel

Sciurus aureogaster

Sciurus aureogaster
F. Cuvier, 1829
introduced; established on Elliott Key
Fl mammals lc.svg
[125]
Eastern grey squirrel

Sciurus carolinensis

Sciurus carolinensis
(Gmelin, 1788)
common; statewide except Lower Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[126]
Fox squirrel

Sciurus niger

Sciurus niger
(Linnaeus, 1758)
rare; statewide except Keys; possibly extinct in southeastern peninsula
Fl mammals lc.svg
[127]
Eastern chipmunk

Tamias striatus

Tamias striatus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
uncommon; northern half of western panhandle in mesic forest areas
Fl mammals lc.svg
[128]
Family Geomyidae: Pocket gophers
Southeastern pocket gopher

Geomys pinetis

Geomys pinetis
(Rafinesque, 1817)
common; panhandle and northern half of peninsula
Fl mammals lc.svg
[129]
Goff's pocket gopher Geomys pinetis goffi
Sherman, 1944
extinct; once endemic to Brevard County
Fl mammals ex.svg
Family Cricetidae: Voles, muskrats
Eastern harvest mouse

Reithrodontomys humulis

Dicrostonyx nunatakensis
(Audubon & Bachman, 1941)
common; panhandle and northern two thirds of peninsula in old fields, grasslands, and fields
Fl mammals lc.svg
[130]
Meadow vole

Microtus pennsylvanicus

Microtus pennsylvanicus
(Ord, 1815)
rare; salt marsh in Cedar Key area of Gulf coast
Fl mammals lc.svg
[131]
Woodland vole

Microtus pinetorum

Microtus pinetorum
(Le Conte, 1830)
uncommon; central portion of northern third of peninsula
Fl mammals lc.svg
[132]
Round-tailed muskrat

Neofiber alleni

Neofiber alleni
(True, 1884)
common; peninsula and isolated populations in Apalachicola and Okefenokee areas
Fl mammals lc.svg
[133]
Florida woodrat

Neotoma Floridana

Neotoma floridana
(Ord, 1818)
uncommon; panhandle, northern two thirds of peninsula and rare; Key Largo
Fl mammals lc.svg
[134]
Golden mouse Ochrotomys nuttalli
(Harlan, 1832)
rare; panhandle and northern half of peninsula
Fl mammals lc.svg
[135]
Marsh rice rat

Oryzomys palustris

Oryzomys palustris
(Harlan, 1837)
common; statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[136]
Cotton mouse

Peromyscus gossypinus

Peromyscus gossypinus
(Le Conte, 1850)
common; statewide in forests and mixed forest/grasslands
Fl mammals lc.svg
[137]
Oldfield mouse

Peromyscus polionotus ammobates.jpg

Peromyscus polionotus

(Wagner, 1843)

common; several endemic subspecies (see below)
Fl mammals lc.svg
Pallid beach mouse Peromyscus polionotus decoloratus
(A.H. Howell, 1939)
extinct; once endemic to Ponce Park in Volusia County and Bulow in Flagler County
Fl mammals ex.svg
Anastasia Island beach mouse

Peromyscus polionotus phasma

Peromyscus polionotus phasma
(Bangs, 1898)
endemic to Anastasia Island in St. Augustine, Florida
Fl mammals en.svg
Perdido Key beach mouse

Peromyscus polionotus trissyllepsis

Peromyscus polionotus trissyllepsis
(Bowen, 1968)
endemic to Perdido Key, Florida
Fl mammals en.svg
Florida mouse Podomys floridanus
(Chapman, 1889)
rare; central peninsula, mostly in habitats along central ridges. Fl mammals nt.svg[138]
Hispid cotton rat

Sigmodon hispidus

Sigmodon hispidus
Say & Ord, 1825
common; statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[139]
Family Muridae: Murids
House mouse

Mus musculus

Mus musculus
Linnaeus, 1758
introduced; common; statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[140]
Brown rat

Rattus norvegicus

Rattus norvegicus
(Berkenhout, 1769)
introduced; common; statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[141]
Black rat

Rattus rattus

Rattus rattus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
introduced; common statewide
Fl mammals lc.svg
[142]
Family Myocastoridae: Nutrias
Coypu

Myocastor coypus

Myocastor coypus
(Molina, 1782)
introduced; Duval County and panhandle populations; possibly established statewide except Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[143]
Family Caviidae: Capybaras
Capybara

[Capybara

Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris
(Linnaeus, 1766)
introduced;[144] while no breeding population has been confirmed, sightings still occur, and it is considered an invasive species
Fl mammals lc.svg
[145]

Shrews and moles[edit]

Three species of shrews (eulipotyphlans) are found across Florida. Two known subspecies are the Homosassa shrew (Sorex longirostris eionis) and Sherman's short-tailed shrew (Blarina carolinensis shermanii).[146] One of their main predators is the cat. Completing the Eulipotyphla are two species of moles.

Common name Scientific name

authority

ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Soricidae: Shrews
Southern short-tailed shrew

Blarina carolinensis

Blarina carolinensis
(Bachman, 1837)
common; statewide except for Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[147]
North American least shrew

Cryptotis parva

Cryptotis parva
(Say, 1823)
common; statewide except for Keys
Fl mammals nd.svg
[148]
Southeastern shrew

Sorex longirostris

Sorex longirostris
Bachman, 1837
uncommon; north, south through Central Florida and on central ridge through southcentral
Fl mammals lc.svg
[149]
Family Talpidae: Moles
Star-nosed mole

Condylura cristata

Condylura cristata
(Linnaeus, 1758)
rare; Okefenokee Swamp area and possibly in Leon County
Fl mammals lc.svg
[150]
Eastern mole

Scalopus aquaticus

Scalopus aquaticus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
common; statewide except for Keys
Fl mammals lc.svg
[151]

Sirenia[edit]

West Indian manatee

Trichechus manatus latirostris is one of the two subspecies of the West Indian manatee. This herbivorous aquatic mammal lives in rivers, springs and shallow coastal waters. It was designated the state marine mammal in 1975[152] and is protected by federal and state laws. Threatened by habitat loss, entanglements in fishing gear and crab traps, or by being asphyxiated or crushed by canal locks and flood gates, the most common cause for manatee deaths is being struck by boats, which caused one quarter of all deaths recorded since 1974. In 2015, the statewide population was estimated at 6,063.[153]

Common name Scientific name

authority

ASM state status and native range[3] Red List
Family Sirenia: Sea cows
West Indian manatee

Trichechus manatus

Trichechus manatus
(Linnaeus, 1758)
rare; coastal marine areas, but not usually north of the Suwannee River in the Gulf of Mexico; enters rivers and connected springs common; peninsula and northern Keys.
Fl mammals vu.svg
[154]

References[edit]

General
  • Brown, L. N. (1997). Mammals of Florida. Miami, Florida: Windward Publishing.
  • Burt, W. H.; R. P. Grossenheider (1976). A field guide to the mammals of America north of Mexico (Third ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.
  • Nowak, R. M. (1991). Walker's mammals of the world (Fifth ed.). Baltimore, Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press.
  • Stevenson, H. M. (1976). Vertebrates of Florida, identification and distribution (Fifth ed.). Gainesville, Florida: University Presses of Florida.
  • Whitaker, J. O.; W. J. Hamilton (1998). Mammals of the Eastern United States (Third ed.). Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press.
  • "State Lists:Mammals of Florida". The American Society of Mammalogists. 2001-05-22. Archived from the original on 2007-08-26. Retrieved 2007-07-18.
Specific
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  2. ^ "§15.0353 2006 Florida Statutes". State of Florida. Retrieved 2007-07-19.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "State Lists:Mammals of Florida". The American Society of Mammalogists. 2001-05-22. Retrieved 2007-07-18. The silver rice rat is not in this list because it was reclassified as a synonym of the marsh rice rat (Oryzomys palustris). Besides that, the classification for animals was updated to reflect current nomenclature, and the common names of animals changed to the names used in Wikipedia articles.
  4. ^ "Accidental Bat Species in Florida". Florida Bat Conservancy. 2005. Archived from the original on 2007-07-12. Retrieved 2007-07-19.
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  56. ^ "Bearded Seal".
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