Ministry of Education (Argentina)

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Ministry of Education
Ministerio de Educación
Mineducacionarg.png
Palacio Sarmiento - panoramio.jpg
Headquarters of the Ministry of Education
Ministry overview
Formed1949; 72 years ago (1949) (first creation)
Preceding Ministry
JurisdictionArgentina
HeadquartersPalacio Sarmiento
Pasaje Pizzurno 935, Buenos Aires
Annual budget$ 397,168,460,932 (2021)[1]
Minister responsible
Parent departmentGovernment of Argentina
Websiteargentina.gob.ar/educacion

The Ministry of Education (Spanish: Ministerio de Educación; ME) of Argentina is a ministry of the national executive power that oversees education policies on all educational levels, alongside the governments of the twenty-three provinces of Argentina and the City of Buenos Aires.

The Ministry was founded in 1949, when the state's education portfolio was split from the Ministry of Justice and Public Instruction in the first cabinet of President Juan Domingo Perón;[2] the first minister was Oscar Ivanissevich. The current minister is Jaime Perczyk, who has served since 20 September 2021 in the cabinet of President Alberto Fernández.[3]

The ministry is headquartered at the Sarmiento Palace, popularly known as "Pizzurno Palace" due to its location on Pasaje Pizzurno, in the Buenos Aires neighbourhood of Recoleta.[4]

List of ministers[edit]

No. Minister Party Term President
Ministry of Education (1949–1956)
1 Oscar Ivanissevich Peronist Party 11 March 1949 – 11 May 1950 Juan Domingo Perón
2 Armando Méndez San Martín Peronist Party 11 May 1950 – 29 June 1955
3 Francisco Marcos Anglada Peronist Party 29 June 1955 – 21 September 1955
4 Atilio Dell'Oro Maini Christian Democratic Party 21 September 1955 – 17 May 1956 Eduardo Lonardi
Pedro Eugenio Aramburu
Ministry of Education and Justice (1949–1956)
5 Carlos Adrogué Radical Civic Union 8 June 1956 – 25 January 1957 Pedro Eugenio Aramburu
6 Acdel Ernesto Salas Independent 25 January 1957 – 1 May 1958
7 Luis Rafael Mac Kay Radical Civic Union 1 May 1958 – 26 March 1962 Arturo Frondizi
8 Miguel Sussini Intransigent Radical Civic Union 26 March 1962 – 29 March 1962
29 March 1962 – 19 October 1962 José María Guido
9 Alberto Rodríguez Galán Independent 11 October 1962 – 15 May 1963
10 José Mariano Astigueta Independent 15 May 1963 – 12 October 1963
11 Carlos Alconada Aramburú Radical Civic Union 12 October 1963 – 28 June 1966 Arturo Illia
Ministry of Education (1966–1973)
12 Carlos María Gelly y Obes Independent 28 June 1966 – 4 June 1967 Juan Carlos Onganía
13 José Mariano Astigueta Independent 4 June 1967 – 23 October 1969
14 Dardo Pérez Guilhou Independent 23 October 1969 – 8 June 1970
15 José Luis Cantini Independent 8 June 1970 – 23 March 1971 Roberto Marcelo Levingston
16 Gustavo Malek Independent 23 March 1971 – 25 May 1973 Alejandro Lanusse
Ministry of Culture and Education (1973)
17 Jorge Alberto Taiana Justicialist Party 25 May 1973 – 13 July 1973 Héctor Cámpora
Ministry of Education (1973–1981)
17 Jorge Alberto Taiana Justicialist Party 13 July 1973 – 14 August 1974 Raúl Lastiri
Juan Domingo Perón
Isabel Perón
18 Oscar Ivanissevich Justicialist Party 14 August 1974 – 11 August 1975 Isabel Perón
19 Pedro J. Arrighi Justicialist Party 11 August 1975 – 24 March 1976
20 Ricardo P. Bruera Independent 29 March 1976 – 28 May 1977 Jorge Rafael Videla
21 Juan José Catalán Independent 28 May 1977 – 26 August 1977
22 Juan Rafael Llerena Amadeo Independent 26 August 1977 – 29 March 1981
Ministry of Culture and Education (1981)
23 Carlos Burundarena Independent 29 March 1981 – 12 December 1981 Roberto Viola
Ministry of Education (1981–1983)
24 Cayetano Licciardo Independent 22 December 1981 – 10 December 1983 Roberto Viola
Ministry of Education and Justice (1983–1989)
25 Carlos Alconada Aramburú Radical Civic Union 10 December 1983 – 21 June 1986 Raúl Alfonsín
26 Julio Rajneri Independent 21 June 1986 – 10 September 1987
27 Jorge Federico Sabato Radical Civic Union 10 September 1987 – 26 May 1989
28 José Gabriel Dumón Radical Civic Union 26 May 1989 – 8 July 1989
Ministry of Education (1989–2001)
29 Antonio Salonia Independent 8 July 1989 – 4 December 1992 Carlos Menem
30 Jorge Alberto Rodríguez Justicialist Party 4 December 1992 – 28 March 1996
31 Susana Decibe Justicialist Party 28 March 1996 – 7 May 1999
32 Manuel García Solá MID 7 May 1999 – 10 December 1999
33 Juan José Llach Radical Civic Union 10 December 1999 – 25 September 2000 Fernando de la Rúa
34 Hugo Juri Radical Civic Union 25 September 2000 – 20 March 2001
35 Andrés Delich Radical Civic Union 20 March 2001 – 21 December 2001
Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (2002–2003)
36 Graciela Giannettasio Justicialist Party 3 January 2002 – 25 May 2003 Eduardo Duhalde
37 Daniel Filmus Justicialist Party 25 May 2003 – 10 December 2007 Néstor Kirchner
Ministry of Education (2007–2015)
38 Juan Carlos Tedesco Independent 10 December 2007 – 20 July 2009 Cristina Fernández de Kirchner
39 Alberto Sileoni Justicialist Party 20 July 2009 – 10 December 2015
Ministry of Education and Sports (2015–2017)
40 Esteban Bullrich Republican Proposal 10 December 2015 – 17 July 2017 Mauricio Macri
Ministry of Education (2017–2018)
41 Alejandro Finocchiaro Republican Proposal 17 July 2017 – 5 September 2018 Mauricio Macri
Ministry of Education, Culture, Science and Technology (2018–2019)
41 Alejandro Finocchiaro Republican Proposal 5 September 2018 – 10 December 2019 Mauricio Macri
Ministry of Education (2019–present)
42 Nicolás Trotta Independent 10 December 2019 – 20 September 2021 Alberto Fernández
43 Jaime Perczyk Independent 20 September 2021 – incumbent

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Presupuesto 2021". Ministerio de Economía (in Spanish). 2020. Retrieved 20 September 2021.
  2. ^ Ferreyra, Gabriela Verónica (8 October 2015). "La educación durante los años peronistas. El Consejo Nacional de Educación y las orientaciones pedagógico-didácticas destinadas a los maestros (1948-1949)" [Education during Peronist Periods. The National Education Council and orientations pedagogic didactics destined for the teachers (1948 – 1949)] (PDF). Revista de Estudios Marítimos y Sociales (in Spanish). Retrieved 20 September 2021.
  3. ^ "Qué dijo Nicolás Trotta en su carta de renuncia al Ministerio de Educación". Perfil (in Spanish). 20 September 2021. Retrieved 20 September 2021.
  4. ^ "Clave: Gobierno suma 80 nuevas obras públicas; sube gasto $708.000 millones". Ámbito (in Spanish). 6 August 2021. Retrieved 20 September 2021.

External links[edit]