Monongalia County, West Virginia

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Monongalia County, West Virginia
Mon Tower.JPG
Seal of Monongalia County, West Virginia
Seal
Map of West Virginia highlighting Monongalia County
Location in the U.S. state of West Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting West Virginia
West Virginia's location in the U.S.
Founded October 9, 1776
Seat Morgantown
Largest city Morgantown
Area
 • Total 366 sq mi (948 km2)
 • Land 360 sq mi (932 km2)
 • Water 5.8 sq mi (15 km2), 1.6%
Population (est.)
 • (2015) 104,236
 • Density 287/sq mi (111/km2)
Congressional district 1st
Time zone Eastern: UTC−5/−4
Website www.co.monongalia.wv.us
New Monongalia County Justice Center in 2017

Monongalia County, known locally as Mon County, is a county in the U.S. state of West Virginia. As of the 2010 census, the population was 96,189,[1] making it West Virginia's third-most populous county. Its county seat is at Morgantown.[2] The county was founded in 1776.[3]

Monongalia County is included in the Morgantown, WV Metropolitan Statistical Area, and is the largest county in North-Central West Virginia. It is part of the Pittsburgh media market.

History[edit]

Map of Ohio, Monongalia, & Yohogania Counties circa 1776. Monongalia County is in magenta.

Monongalia County takes its name from the Monongahela River. The name Monongalia may be a misspelling of Monongahela. Alternatively, the conventional Latinate ending "-ia" (designating "land of..." or "country of..." — as in Arabia, Bolivia or Columbia) may have been added to Monongahela (i.e., "Land of the Monongahela").

Monongalia County was formed in 1776 when Virginia's remote District of West Augusta was divided into three counties: Ohio, Yohogania and Monongalia, all named for their most prominent rivers. Ohio County then encompassed most of the western region of the district bordering the Ohio River, including parts of what is now southwestern Pennsylvania. Yohogania County consisted of much of what is now southwestern Pennsylvania and the present counties of Hancock and the northern part of Brooke in West Virginia. Monongalia County also encompassed what are now the counties of Tucker, Randolph, Harrison and Barbour in north-central West Virginia, as well as parts of what are now Washington, Greene and Fayette Counties in Pennsylvania. In 1780, in his Notes on the State of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson gave the militia enrollment of what was then the vast Monongalia County at 1,000 troops.

Geography[edit]

Adjacent counties[edit]

Major Highways[edit]

Rivers, streams, and lakes[edit]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
17904,768
18008,54079.1%
181012,79349.8%
182011,060−13.5%
183014,05627.1%
184017,36823.6%
185012,387−28.7%
186013,0485.3%
187013,5473.8%
188014,98510.6%
189015,7054.8%
190019,04921.3%
191024,33427.7%
192033,61838.2%
193050,08349.0%
194051,2522.3%
195060,79718.6%
196055,617−8.5%
197063,71414.6%
198075,02417.8%
199075,5090.6%
200081,8668.4%
201096,18917.5%
Est. 2016104,622[4]8.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[5]
1790–1960[6] 1900–1990[7]
1990–2000[8] 2010–2015[1]

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[9] of 2000, there were 81,866 people, 33,446 households, and 18,495 families residing in the county. The population density was 227 people per square mile (88/km²). There were 36,695 housing units at an average density of 102 per square mile (39/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 92.22% White, 3.38% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 2.45% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 1.39% from two or more races. 1.01% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 33,446 households out of which 24.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.80% were married couples living together, 8.30% had a female householder with no husband present, and 44.70% were non-families. 31.30% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.28 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the county, the population was spread out with 18.20% under the age of 18, 23.40% from 18 to 24, 27.70% from 25 to 44, 20.00% from 45 to 64, and 10.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 30 years. For every 100 females, there were 101.80 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $28,625, and the median income for a family was $43,628. Males had a median income of $33,113 versus $23,828 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,106. About 11.30% of families and 22.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.90% of those under age 18 and 8.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 96,189 people, 39,777 households, and 20,032 families residing in the county.[10] The population density was 267.1 inhabitants per square mile (103.1/km2). There were 43,238 housing units at an average density of 120.1 per square mile (46.4/km2).[11] The racial makeup of the county was 91.0% white, 3.6% black or African American, 3.1% Asian, 0.2% American Indian, 0.4% from other races, and 1.8% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.8% of the population.[10] In terms of ancestry, 25.7% were German, 17.1% were Irish, 13.0% were English, 11.0% were Italian, 7.5% were American, and 5.0% were Polish.[12]

Of the 39,777 households, 22.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.3% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 49.6% were non-families, and 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.24 and the average family size was 2.87. The median age was 29.1 years.[10]

The median income for a household in the county was $39,167 and the median income for a family was $62,966. Males had a median income of $43,383 versus $32,164 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,116. About 8.6% of families and 21.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.2% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.[13]

Politics[edit]

In presidential elections since 1916, the winner of Monongalia County won West Virginia as a whole, even if the candidate in question lost the national election, such was the case in 1916, 1952, 1968, 1980, and 1988. In 2008 however, Democrat Barack Obama narrowly won the county while Republican John McCain comfortably carried West Virginia, the first time since Theodore Roosevelt in 1912 that the county failed to back the statewide winner.

Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[14]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 50.1% 18,432 40.0% 14,699 9.9% 3,633
2012 53.3% 16,831 43.8% 13,826 3.0% 934
2008 47.0% 15,775 50.8% 17,060 2.2% 734
2004 51.5% 17,670 47.6% 16,313 0.9% 323
2000 49.7% 13,595 46.1% 12,603 4.3% 1,169
1996 38.0% 10,189 50.0% 13,406 12.0% 3,225
1992 34.4% 9,831 49.4% 14,142 16.3% 4,650
1988 45.9% 12,091 53.8% 14,178 0.3% 69
1984 53.0% 14,972 46.8% 13,236 0.2% 66
1980 43.0% 11,972 46.3% 12,883 10.7% 2,971
1976 42.3% 11,827 57.8% 16,163
1972 61.0% 16,758 39.0% 10,721
1968 38.7% 9,261 54.8% 13,128 6.5% 1,556
1964 27.2% 6,473 72.8% 17,358
1960 46.8% 11,523 53.2% 13,103
1956 56.1% 14,046 44.0% 11,016
1952 49.9% 13,111 50.1% 13,152
1948 43.0% 9,329 56.0% 12,138 1.0% 216
1944 48.1% 9,647 52.0% 10,429
1940 44.5% 10,367 55.5% 12,940
1936 39.0% 8,811 60.6% 13,677 0.4% 94
1932 43.8% 8,417 53.7% 10,319 2.5% 485
1928 64.1% 11,364 34.9% 6,182 1.1% 188
1924 49.6% 6,994 35.3% 4,977 15.2% 2,139
1920 64.0% 6,773 32.5% 3,442 3.5% 369
1916 57.5% 3,412 37.5% 2,227 5.0% 297
1912 23.2% 1,216 31.9% 1,673 44.9% 2,352

Education[edit]

The county's public schools are operated by Monongalia County Schools. The county is also home to West Virginia's largest university, West Virginia University, located in Morgantown.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Census-designated places[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

See also[edit]

Other sources[edit]

  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. I: Prelude (1974), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.
  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. II: The Pioneers (1976), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.
  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. III: Discord (1979), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.
  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. IV: Industrialization (1984), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.
  • Core, Earl Lemley, The Monongalia Story: A Bicentennial History, Vol. V: Sophistication (1984), Parsons, W.Va.: McClain Printing Co.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on July 15, 2011. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved 2011-06-07. 
  3. ^ West Virginia Counties Archived 2001-09-23 at the Wayback Machine.. Wvculture.org. Retrieved on 2013-07-24.
  4. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017. 
  5. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  6. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  7. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 10, 2014. 
  9. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2011-05-14. 
  10. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  11. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  12. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  13. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2016-04-03. 
  14. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-28. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 39°38′N 80°03′W / 39.63°N 80.05°W / 39.63; -80.05