Arab salad

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Arab salad
Arabsalad.jpg
Type Salad
Course Mezze
Main ingredients Vegetables, spices
Cookbook:Arab salad  Arab salad

Arab salad is any of a variety of salad dishes that form part of Arab cuisine. Combining many different vegetables and spices, and often served as part of a mezze, Arab salads include those from Algeria and Tunisia such as the "Algerian salad" (Salata Jaza'iriya) and "Black Olive and Orange salad" (Salatat Zaytoon) and from Tunisia Salata Machwiya is a grilled salad made from peppers, tomatoes, garlic and onions with olives and tuna on top, those from Syria and Lebanon such as "Artichoke salad" (Salataf Khurshoof) and "Beet salad" (Salatat Shamandar), and those from Palestine and Jordan such as "Avocado salad".[1] Other popular Arab salads eaten throughout the Arab world include fattoush and tabouli.[2][3]

A recipe for "Arab salad" in Woman's Day magazine includes diced tomato, cucumber and onion.[4] Often mixed with parsley and combined with the juice of freshly squeezed lemon and olive oil, unlike many Western salads, Arabic salad contains no lettuce. All the vegetables, except the onion, are left unpeeled, and the salad should be served immediately. Other variations include serving with fried pita slices or adding sumac to the lemon and oil dressing.[5] Among Palestinians, this "Arabic salad" is known as Salatat al-Bundura ("tomato salad") and is popularly served alongside rice dishes.[6][7]

Similar salads in the Middle East include Persian salad shirazi,[8] the Turkish choban salad, and Israeli salad.[9]

See also[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Salloum et al., 1997, p. 56-58.
  2. ^ Shulman, 2007, p. 128.
  3. ^ Wright, 2001, p. 251.
  4. ^ Women's Day Magazine: Arabic Salad
  5. ^ Recipes from Bahrain and the Rest of the Middle East
  6. ^ Arabic Salad Recipe
  7. ^ Farsoun, 2004, p. 138.
  8. ^ Authentic Iranian recipe for Salad-e Shirazi
  9. ^ The Book of Jewish Food: An Odyssey from Samarkand to New York, Claudia Roden, Knopf, 1996, p. 248

Bibliography[edit]

  • Farsoun, Samih K. (2004), Culture and Customs of the Palestinians (Illustrated ed.), Greenwood Publishing Group, ISBN 978-0-313-32051-4 
  • Salloum, Habeeb; Peters, James; Cassidy, Neal (1997), From the Lands of Figs and Olives: Over 300 Delicious and Unusual Recipes from the Middle East and North Africa (Illustrated ed.), I.B.Tauris, ISBN 978-1-86064-038-4 
  • Shulman, Martha Rose (2007), Mediterranean Harvest: Vegetarian Recipes from the World's Healthiest Cuisine (Illustrated ed.), Rodale, ISBN 978-1-59486-234-2 
  • Wright, Clifford A. (2001), Mediterranean Vegetables: A Cook's ABC of Vegetables and Their Preparation in Spain, France, Italy, Greece, Turkey, the Middle East, and North Africa with More Than 200 Authentic Recipes for the Home Cook (Illustrated ed.), Harvard Common Press, ISBN 978-1-55832-196-0