Curcuma amada

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Curcuma amada
Roots of Curcuma amada 3.JPG
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Monocots
(unranked): Commelinids
Order: Zingiberales
Family: Zingiberaceae
Genus: Curcuma
Species: C. amada
Binomial name
Curcuma amada
Roxburgh
Synonyms

Curcuma mangga Valeton & van Zijp

Curcuma amada (mango ginger) is a plant of the ginger family Zingiberaceae and is closely related to turmeric. The rhizomes are very similar to ginger but have a raw mango taste.[1] They are used in making pickles in south India. The taxonomy of the species is a subject of some confusion as some authorities have considered the name C. mangga as identical while others describe it as a distinct species with C. mangga being found in southern India while C. amada is of east Indian origin.[2]

Curcuma mangga extracts have shown cytotoxic activities on KB[disambiguation needed], A549, Ca Ski, HT-29 and MRC-5 cancer cell lines.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Alapati Srinivasa Rao, Bandaru Rajanikanth, Ramachandran Seshadri (1989). "Volatile aroma components of Curcuma amada Roxb". J. Agric. Food Chem. 37 (3): 740–743. doi:10.1021/jf00087a036. 
  2. ^ Leong-Škorničková (2010). "Stability of names in Indian Curcuma". Taxon 59 (1): 269–282. 
  3. ^ Malek SN, Lee GS, Hong SL, Yaacob H, Wahab NA, Faizal Weber JF, Shah SA"Phytochemical and cytotoxic investigations of Curcuma mangga rhizomes." Molecules. 2011;16(6):4539-48