Dark Horse Comics

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Dark Horse Comics
Dark Horse Comics logo.svg
Founded 1986
Founder Mike Richardson
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location Milwaukie, Oregon
Key people Mike Richardson
Mike Mignola (Hellboy)
Frank Miller (Sin City)
Eric Powell (The Goon)
Joss Whedon (Buffy The Vampire Slayer)
Geof Darrow (Hard Boiled)
Mike Allred (Madman)
Stan Sakai (Usagi Yojimbo)
Publication types Comics
Official website www.darkhorse.com
Dark Horse Comics headquarters

Dark Horse Comics is an American comic book and manga publisher.

Dark Horse Comics was founded in 1986 by Mike Richardson in Milwaukie, Oregon, with the concept of establishing an ideal atmosphere for creative professionals. Richardson started out by opening his first comic book store, Pegasus Books, in Bend, Oregon, in 1980. From there he was able to use the funds from his retail operation to start his own publishing company. Dark Horse Presents and Boris the Bear were the two initial titles in 1986 and within one year of its first publication, Dark Horse Comics added nine new titles to its roster, including The American, The Mark, Trekker, and Black Cross. In 2011, Dark Horse Presents relaunched including the return of Paul Chadwick's Concrete and Steve Niles's Criminal Macabre, as well as new talent including Sanford Greene, Carla Speed McNeil, Nate Crosby and others.

Overview[edit]

Dark Horse publishes many licensed comics, including comics based on Star Wars, Avatar: The Last Airbender, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Aliens, Predator, Mass Effect, Dragon Age, Conan and Who Wants to be a Superhero? Dark Horse also publishes creator owned comics such as Frank Miller's Sin City and 300, Mike Mignola's Hellboy, Stan Sakai's Usagi Yojimbo, Gerard Way's Umbrella Academy, and Michael Chabon's The Escapist. Today, the comic arm of the company flourishes despite no longer having its own universe of superpowered characters.[1] Dark Horse also published the English translation of Hyrule Historia in 2013.[2]

Imprints and studios[edit]

Comics' Greatest World/Dark Horse Heroes (1993–1996)[edit]

From 1993 to 1996, Dark Horse published a line of superhero comics under the Comics' Greatest World imprint, which was later renamed Dark Horse Heroes. After 1996, publication of this line came to a near halt, ceasing production of any books concerning the characters with the publication of the last crossover books involving Ghost, in the early 2000s.

Legend (1994–1998)[edit]

Legend was a comic book imprint at Dark Horse Comics created in 1994 by Frank Miller and John Byrne as an avenue for creator-owned projects.[3] Its logo was a moai drawn by Mike Mignola. Later on, other creators were asked to join them. The imprint ended in 1998.

Members[edit]

Dark Horse Manga[edit]

Dark Horse Manga is an imprint for Japanese manga. Publications include Akira, Astro Boy, Berserk, Blade of the Immortal, Ghost in the Shell, Lone Wolf and Cub, Trigun and Blood Blockade Battlefront by Yasuhiro Nightow, Gantz, Hellsing and Drifters by Kouta Hirano, Blood+, Multiple Personality Detective Psycho, Fooly Cooly, Oreimo, and America's longest running manga series, Oh My Goddess! by Kōsuke Fujishima. Dark Horse also publishes a number of CLAMP titles, including Clover, Chobits, Okimono Kimono, Cardcaptor Sakura, Magic Knight Rayearth, and Gate 7. A manga magazine titled Super Manga Blast was published by Dark Horse starting in the spring of 2000. It was discontinued in December 2005 after 59 issues.[4]

Dark Horse also publish a number of Korean manhwa titles, including Banya: The Explosive Delivery Man. [5]

Maverick (1999–2002)[edit]

Main article: Maverick (Dark Horse)

Maverick was an imprint for creator owned material.

DH Press[edit]

The DH Press imprint publishes novelizations of Dark Horse's more popular comic book titles, including Aliens and Predator. DH Press has now been absorbed by DH Books.

M Press[edit]

Publications ranging from novels to film books by Leonard Maltin about John Landis, to comic related material such as a biography of Will Eisner, to health books. They have also published a series reprinting Playboy interviews. The M Press imprint was created to publish a diverse list of both literary fiction and non-fiction prose for authors with a unique voice. The newest addition to M Press is an original comic series by Tom Morello called Orchid. Issue one is due out October 12, 2011.

Dark Horse Digital[edit]

In 2011, Dark Horse launched their iOS app and online digital comics store, followed by the release of the beta version of a native Android app in 2012. Any device with a modern web browser can be used to read Dark Horse comics at their web store.

DH Deluxe[edit]

Initiated in 1998, Dark Horse Deluxe rolled out a line of merchandise that included model kits, toys, apparel and collectibles. Its original purpose was to draw on Dark Horse properties but expanded to include such collectibles as Tim Burton's Tragic Toys for Girls and Boys, Joss Whedon's Serenity, and most recently, merchandise for the popular video-game franchise Mass Effect. Dark Horse, working with Big Tent Entertainment and the NHK broadcasting corporation, brought Domo-kun to the United States with a series of products ranging from Qee figurines to journals and stationery sets.

Titles[edit]

Dark Horse Comics has acquired the rights to make comic book adaptations of many popular films and series. Some of these include Aliens, Army of Darkness (before Dynamite Entertainment acquired the license), Indiana Jones, Predator, Predators, RoboCop, The Thing, Star Wars, The Terminator, Timecop, Buffy the Vampire Slayer (and its spin-off, Angel), Planet of the Apes, Let Me In and Avatar: The Last Airbender.

In 2013 CCP Games announced that Dark Horse would be publishing a series of comic books based on stories collected from players of the MMORPG EVE Online. [6]

In 2014, Lucasfilm announced that, as of 2015, future Star Wars comics would be published by Lucasfilm's corporate sibling, Marvel Comics.[7]

Dark Horse Entertainment[edit]

Dark Horse's production studio arm, Dark Horse Entertainment, produces films and television shows based on Dark Horse Comics. Established by Richardson in 1992, Dark Horse Entertainment set up shop on the lot at Twentieth Century Fox through a first-look deal with Larry Gordon and Largo Entertainment. Dark Horse Entertainment has produced over two dozen films and television projects.[8]

Television[edit]

The following are TV projects based on Dark Horse comic books:[9]

Films[edit]

The following are feature films based on series from Dark Horse Comics:[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "From the Editor's Desk: Scott Allie". Comic Book Resources. Retrieved 2010-03-23. 
  2. ^ "Information". Retrieved 2013-06-08. 
  3. ^ Khoury, George; Eric Nolen-Weathington (2006). Modern Masters Volume Six: Arthur Adams. TwoMorrows Publishing. ISBN 978-1-893905-54-2. 
  4. ^ "Super Manga Blast Discontinued". Anime News Network. November 24, 2005. Retrieved November 1, 2011. 
  5. ^ "Dark Horse manhwa explodes on the scene with Banya". DARK HORSE COMICS CELEBRATING 20 YEARS: 1986 - 2006 Comic Book Bin, June 7, 2006. Retrieved June 6 2013.
  6. ^ "EVE Online TV series and Dark Horse comic to be based on players’ true stories". PC Gamer. April 27, 2013. Retrieved May 1, 2013. 
  7. ^ "STAR WARS Comics Go to Marvel in 2015, Dark Horse Responds". Newsarama. January 3, 2014. Retrieved January 3, 2014. 
  8. ^ "Dark Horse/Universal Sign First Look Deal". Newsarama. March 18, 2008. 
  9. ^ "Best 'Dark Horse Comics' Television". IMDb. 
  10. ^ "Best 'Dark Horse Comics' Movies". IMDb. May 1, 2009. Retrieved 2010-07-28. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]

Interviews[edit]