Milwaukie, Oregon

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"Milwaukie" redirects here. For the city in Wisconsin, see Milwaukee.
Milwaukie
City
Milwaukie, Oregon
Lone Elk Island
Lone Elk Island
Nickname(s): The Dogwood City of the West
Motto: A "great" place to live, work, and play.
Location in Oregon
Location in Oregon
Coordinates: 45°26′46″N 122°38′21″W / 45.44611°N 122.63917°W / 45.44611; -122.63917Coordinates: 45°26′46″N 122°38′21″W / 45.44611°N 122.63917°W / 45.44611; -122.63917
Country United States
State Oregon
Counties Clackamas, Multnomah
Incorporated 1903
Government
 • Mayor Jeremy Ferguson
Area[1]
 • Total 4.85 sq mi (12.56 km2)
 • Land 4.82 sq mi (12.48 km2)
 • Water 0.03 sq mi (0.08 km2)
Elevation 43 ft (13 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 20,291
 • Estimate (2013)[3] 20,512
 • Density 4,209.8/sq mi (1,625.4/km2)
Time zone Pacific (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific (UTC-7)
ZIP codes 97222, 97267, 97269
Area code(s) 503 and 971
FIPS code 41-48650[4]
GNIS feature ID 1166682[5]
Website City of Milwaukie

Milwaukie /mɪlˈwɔːk/ is a city in Clackamas County, Oregon, United States. A very small portion of the city extends into Multnomah County.[6] The population was 20,291 at the 2010 census. Founded in 1847 on the banks of the Willamette River, the city, known as the Dogwood City of the West, was incorporated in 1903 and is noted as the birthplace of the Bing cherry. The city is now a suburb of Portland and also adjoins the unincorporated areas of Clackamas and Oak Grove.

History[edit]

Lot Whitcomb

Milwaukie was settled in 1847 and formally platted in 1849 as a rival to the upriver Oregon City by Lot Whitcomb, who named it for Milwaukee, Wisconsin. At the time, the Wisconsin city was also frequently spelled "Milwaukie" before the current spelling was adopted.[7][8] Some accounts also state that the Oregon city used an alternate spelling to prevent confusion at the post office.[9]

Whitcomb arrived in Oregon in 1848 and settled on a donation land claim, where he built a sawmill and a gristmill.[10] Milwaukie rivaled Portland and Oregon City for a time, but Portland eventually became the bigger city because it had a deeper port.[10] The first post office at Milwaukie was established in 1850, with Whitcomb as the first postmaster.[8] The community was incorporated by the Oregon Legislative Assembly on February 4, 1903, originally as the Town of Milwaukie.[11]

The Oregon and California Railroad named their station there Milwaukee in 1870 and corrected it to Milwaukie in 1892.[8] As the city center grew further from the railroad and a branch line was built across the Willamette to Oswego, Milwaukie station was replaced and renamed Lambert for Joseph H. Lambert, a pioneer orchardist who developed the Lambert cherry.[8] The name of the station was changed to East Milwaukee in 1913 and corrected to East Milwaukie in 1916.[8]

The Bing cherry, among other varieties, was developed in Milwaukie by another pioneer orchardist, Seth Lewelling, who settled in the area with his brother Henderson Luelling.[10]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 4.85 square miles (12.56 km2), of which, 4.82 square miles (12.48 km2) is land and 0.03 square miles (0.08 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 860
1920 1,172 36.3%
1930 1,767 50.8%
1940 1,871 5.9%
1950 5,253 180.8%
1960 9,099 73.2%
1970 16,379 80.0%
1980 17,931 9.5%
1990 18,692 4.2%
2000 20,490 9.6%
2010 20,291 −1.0%
Est. 2013 20,512 1.1%
Sources:[12] [13][14][15][4][3]
Bing cherries

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 20,291 people, 8,667 households, and 5,075 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,209.8 inhabitants per square mile (1,625.4 /km2). There were 9,138 housing units at an average density of 1,895.9 per square mile (732.0 /km2). The racial makeup of the city was 88.5% White, 1.3% African American, 1.3% Native American, 2.5% Asian, 0.3% Pacific Islander, 2.5% from other races, and 3.6% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.0% of the population.

There were 8,667 households of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.5% were married couples living together, 11.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 41.4% were non-families. 31.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.91.

The median age in the city was 39.9 years. 20.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.8% were from 25 to 44; 29.2% were from 45 to 64; and 13.6% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.6% male and 51.4% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 20,490 people, 8,561 households, and 5,282 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,256.5 people per square mile (1,644.7/km²). There were 8,988 housing units at an average density of 1,867.1 per square mile (721.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 90.96% White, 0.95% African American, 0.94% Native American, 2.36% Asian, 0.25% Pacific Islander, 1.60% from other races, and 2.94% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.97% of the population.

There were 8,561 households out of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.8% were married couples living together, 11.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.3% were non-families. 30.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the city the population was spread out with 22.8% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 31.2% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 93.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $43,635, and the median income for a family was $51,649. Males had a median income of $36,674 versus $29,957 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,342. About 6.2% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.4% of those under age 18 and 6.6% of those age 65 or over.

Economy[edit]

Dark Horse Comics headquarters

Currently, the downtown area of Milwaukie is undergoing a revival in which new apartments and retail space are under construction and a riverfront park is being developed.[16] Existing attractions include a Sunday farmers' market and restaurants, coffee shops and stores.[citation needed]

Bob's Red Mill is a modern-day gristmill and natural foods company based in Milwaukie while across the street is the headquarters of Dave's Killer Bread a popular brand of organic whole-grain breads.

Milwaukie is the home of Dark Horse Comics. Dark Horse is known for publishing works including Sin City, Hellboy, and the original graphic novel 300, as well for producing dozens of films and television series, including The Mask and TimeCop, based on characters created by Dark Horse founder Mike Richardson. The total office space of Dark Horse Comics occupies three of the city blocks in downtown Milwaukie, sporting numerous display windows visible to transit riders.[17]

Top employers[edit]

According to Milwaukie's 2012 Comprehensive Annual Financial Report,[18] the top employers in the city are:

# Employer # of Employees
1 Unified Grocers 630
2 PCC Structurals 500
3 RM International 500
4 North Clackamas School District 385
5 Pacific Scientific-OECO 126
6 Safeway 280
7 Warn Industries 250
8 Sabin-Schellenberg Center 200
9 Goodwill Industries of the Columbia Willamette 200
10 Marquis Companies 200

Education[edit]

Milwaukie is served by the North Clackamas School District and most children attend one of ten public elementary schools, four public middle schools, Rex Putnam High School, Milwaukie High School, and New Urban High School. Since 1996, Milwaukie High School has annually hosted the nationally recognized[19] Living History Day. On this day thousands of veterans are welcomed into the school to help educate students about the past. There is also a private Catholic high school, La Salle High School, named after St. Jean-Baptiste de la Salle, and the Portland Waldorf School, a private Waldorf school, which serves grades K-12.

The city is home to the Ledding Library, a public library that is part of the Library Information Network of Clackamas County.

Transportation[edit]

Milwaukie is served by one of nine TriMet transit centers.[20]

As of 2012, construction of the MAX Orange Line, a light-rail connection between Portland and Milwaukie, is underway. Although this project has been planned for many years, it faces strong opposition by opponents of "Portland Creep";[21] in September 2012, opponents succeeded in passing a ballot initiative requiring that all Clackamas County spending on light rail be directly approved by the voters.[22]

Mayors of Milwaukie[edit]

  • William Shindler (1903-1909)
  • Philip Streib (1909-1913)
  • E.T. Elmer (1913-1915)
  • Guy C. Pelton (1915-1917)
  • John Snyder (1917-1923)
  • Alfred E. Cowell (1923-1927)
  • J.J. Miller (1927-1935)
  • J.M. Mason (1935)
  • William Sanders (1935-1937)
  • Earl S. Burdick (1937-1940)
  • Fred O. Roberts (1940-1945)
  • Fred Sperr (1945-1952)
  • Leonard Mullan (1952-1959)
  • Earl Clay (1959-1963)
  • Joe Bernard, Jr. (1963-1965)
  • George Haley (1965)
  • Robert Richmond (1965-1968)
  • Frank Clore (1968-1969)
  • Donald Graf (1969-1975)
  • Bill Hupp (1975-1979)
  • Allen Manuel (1979-1980)
  • Joy Burgess (1980-1984)
  • Ron Kinsella (1984-1986)
  • Roger Hall (1986-1990)
  • Craig Lomnicki (1990-1998)
  • Donald Graf (1998)
  • Carolyn Tomei (1998-2001)
  • James Bernard (2001-2009)
  • Jeremy Ferguson (2009-Present)[23][24]

Notable people[edit]

Sister city[edit]

Milwaukie has one sister city[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-21. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-12-21. 
  3. ^ a b "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2014-09-26. 
  4. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ House, Kelly (November 4, 2013). "Multnomah County election: District boundary quirks put Hillsboro measure on ballot". The Oregonian. Retrieved 5 November 2013. 
  7. ^ "When Milwaukee was Milwaukie"
  8. ^ a b c d e McArthur, Lewis A.; Lewis L. McArthur (2003) [1928]. Oregon Geographic Names (Seventh Edition ed.). Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society Press. pp. 557, 648. ISBN 0-87595-277-1. 
  9. ^ City of Milwaukie official website: "City Facts & Trivia"
  10. ^ a b c Cogswell, Philip Jr. (1977). Capitol Names: Individuals Woven Into Oregon's History. Portland, Oregon: Oregon Historical Society. pp. 113–115. 
  11. ^ Whitney, J. R. (1905). The Special Laws of the State of Oregon Enacted by The Twenty-third Legislative Assembly Regular Session. Salem, Oregon: State Printer. p. 1. 
  12. ^ "Population-Oregon". U.S. Census 1910. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Population-Oregon". 15th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 27 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Oregon". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Pennsylvania: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  16. ^ "Milwaukie is Poised for Growth". Retrieved May 1, 2009. 
  17. ^ Boucher, Geoff (July 19, 2008). "Welcome to Milwaukie, Ore., Hellboy's hometown". LA Times. Retrieved May 1, 2009. 
  18. ^ City of Milwaukie CAFR
  19. ^ "Living History Day: Milwaukie High School". The Virtual Schoolhouse. 
  20. ^ "TriMet". 
  21. ^ "Checkpoint Clackamas! Keeping Portland Out—to Let More Republicans In?". Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  22. ^ "Clackamas County anti-rail measure passes comfortably; effect could resonate for decades". Retrieved 27 November 2012. 
  23. ^ Milwaukie Centennial Memories
  24. ^ http://www.milwaukieoregon.gov/cityrecorder/mayors-milwaukie
  25. ^ "Child's Play: Living Out a Dream - bowler Dave Husted". Bowling Digest. December 2000. Retrieved September 15, 2010. [dead link]
  26. ^ "Japan-America Society of Oregon". 

External links[edit]