List of political parties in South Korea

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Constitution

This article lists political parties in South Korea. South Korea has a multi-party system[1][2][3][4] in which political parties have a chance of gaining power alone.

Current Parties[edit]

Main Parties[edit]

As of March 2014, there are four political parties present in the 19th National Assembly:

Party Number of Seats in
the National Assembly
Leader Position Comments
  Saenuri Party (NFP - New Frontier Party)
새누리당 / 새누리黨
Saenuridang
156 Kim Moo-sung Right-wing to Centre-right see: Conservatism in South Korea
Conservative; formerly called the Grand National Party.
  New Politics Alliance for Democracy (NPAD)
새정치민주연합/ 새政治民主聯合
Saejeongchi Minju Yeonhap
130 Ahn Cheol-soo
Kim Han-gill
Centre to Centre-left see: Liberalism in South Korea
Liberal; merged from the Democratic Party and the minor New Political Vision Party.
  Unified Progressive Party (UPP)
통합진보당 / 統合進步黨
Tonghap Jinbodang
6 Lee Jung-hee Left-wing Progressive; merged from the Democratic Labor Party, People's Participation Party,
and a faction of the New Progressive Party.
Justice Party 
정의당 / 正義黨
Jeongeuidang
5 Cheon Ho-sun Centre-left Progressive; splintered from the Unified Progressive Party.

Notes:

  1. All data are current as of September 1, 2013.
  2. As of March 25, 2013 the total number of representatives is 300.
  3. As of March 25, 2013 ten representatives are independents.
  4. As of March 25, 2013 three representatives have lost their positions due to various reasons and will be reelected through the next by-election scheduled on April 24, 2013.

Extra Parliamentary Parties[edit]

Illegal/Banned Parties[edit]

Defunct Parties[edit]

Timeline of all mainstream political parties

Conservative Parties[edit]

Liberal Parties[edit]

Progressive Parties[edit]

Green Parties[edit]

Illegal/Banned Parties[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Economist, June 5, 2008, South Korea: Summer of discontent -- President Lee Myung-bak's first 100 days have not gone according to plan, Accessed Oct 19, 2013, “...none of South Korea's political parties seems to be trusted by a public concerned about rising prices and the uncertain economic outlook...”
  2. ^ The Economist, April 1, 2004, Print edition, South Korea: South by south-east: Regionalism could be on its way out, Accessed Oct 19, 2013, “...The Millennium Democratic Party (MDP), ... has traditionally had its stronghold in the Cholla region, while the conservative Grand National Party (GNP), ...”
  3. ^ The Economist, print edition, April 11, 2008, South Korea's election: A narrow victory for the business-friendly centre-right, Accessed Oct 19, 2013, Note: four parties are listed in this article about the 2008 election: “...The centre-right Grand National Party (GNP) ... The Liberty Forward Party (LFP), ... won 18 seats. ... United Democratic Party (UDP). ... won 152 seats in 2004, ... United New Democratic Party (UNDP) ...”
  4. ^ The New York Times, August 21, 2006, Post-Koizumi, dream of a two-party system, Accessed Oct. 18, 2013, quote: “...This is positive. A two-party system isn't here yet, but it's a kind of dream we have...”