Orders of magnitude (volume)

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The boxes show the relative sizes of volumes from 1 to 1000 cubic units

The pages linked in the right-hand column contain lists of volumes that are of the same order of magnitude (power of ten). Rows in the table represent increasing powers of a thousand. (Note: dam3 and hm3 stand for cubic decametre and cubic hectometre respectively. The terms in the left-hand column are common terminology.)

List of orders of magnitude for volume
Factor ( ) Multiple Value
10−105 -- 4.22419 ×10−105 m3[citation needed] is the Planck volume
10−45 -- Classical volume of an electron (~9.4×10−44 m3)
10−42 -- Volume of a proton (~1.5×10−41 m3)
10−33 -- Volume of a hydrogen atom (6.54×10−32 m3) 10-33 m3, 10-32 m3, 10-31 m3
10−21 1 attolitre Volume of a typical virus (5 attolitres, a million million times a hydrogen atom) 10-21 m3, 10-20 m3, 10-19 m3
10−18 1 femtolitre Volume of a human red blood cell (90 femtolitres, 9×10−17 m3) 10-18 m3, 10-17 m3, 10-16 m3
10−15 1 picolitre A very fine grain of sand (0.063 mm diameter, 3 micrograms, 130 picolitres, almost a million times a virus) 10-15 m3, 10-14 m3, 10-13 m3
10−12 1 nanolitre A medium grain of sand (0.5 mm diameter, 1.5 milligrams, 62 nanolitres, almost five hundred very fine sand grains) 10-12 m3, 10-11 m3, 10-10 m3
10−9 1 microlitre A large grain (granule) of sand (2.0 mm diameter, 95 milligrams, 4 microlitres, 64 medium sand grains) 10-9 m3, 10-8 m3, 10-7 m3
10−6 1 millilitre
(1 cubic centimetre)
1 teaspoon = 3.55 ml to 5 ml (about 1000 large sand grains)

1 tablespoon = 14.2 ml to 20 ml

1 cm3, 10 cm3, 100 cm3


10−3 1 litre
(1 cubic decimetre)
200 5ml teaspoons
1 U.S. quart = 0.95 liters;
1 United Kingdom quart = 1.14 litres
1 dm3, 10 dm3, 100 dm3
100 1000 litres
(one cubic metre)
Large domestic fridge-freezer (external dimensions)
20-foot shipping container = 38.5 m3
1 m3, 10 m3, 100 m3
103 1000 cubic metres
(1 million litres)
An Olympic size swimming pool, 25 metres by 50 metres by 2 metres deep, holds at least 2.5 million litres. 1 dam3, 10 dam3, 100 dam3
106 1 million cubic metres About the volume of Taipei 101's gross floor space[1]

Volume of oil spilt in the biggest oil gusher in U.S. history, the 1910 Lakeview Gusher = 1.4 billion litres = 1.4 million m3

1 hm3, 10 hm3
108 -- Volume of all humans alive on the planet (based on average mass of 40-70kg per human) = ~0.3-0.5 km3 100 hm3
109 1 cubic kilometre Volume of Lake Mead (Hoover Dam) = 35.2 km3

Volume of crude oil on Earth = ~300 km3

1 km3, 10 km3, 100 km3
1012 1000 cubic kilometres Volume of Lake Superior = 12,232 km3

Volume of Lake Baikal = 23,600 km3

1012 m3, 1013 m3, 1014 m3
1015 -- Volume of Greenland ice cap = 2.6×1015 m3

Volume of Ceres = 4.5×1017 m3

1015 m3, 1016 m3, 1017 m3
1018 -- Volume of water in all Earth oceans = 1.4×1018 m3

Volume of Pluto = 6.4×1018 m3

1018 m3, 1019 m3, 1020 m3
1021 -- Volume of Earth = ~1×1021 m3 1021 m3, 1022 m3, 1023 m3
1024 -- Volume of Jupiter = ~1×1024 m3 1024 m3, 1025 m3, 1026 m3
1027 -- Volume of Sun = ~1×1027 m3 1027 m3, 1028 m3, 1029 m3
1030 -- Volume of a red giant the same mass as the Sun = ~5×1032 m3 1030 m3, 1031 m3, 1032 m3
1033 -- Volume of Betelgeuse = ~2.75×1035 m3 1033 m3, 1034 m3, 1035 m3
1036 -- Volume of the star Mu Cephei = 4 ×1036 m3 1036 m3, 1037 m3, 1038 m3
1039 -- Volume of the Heliosphere inside the Termination shock = 6 to 10 ×1039 m3 1039 m3, 1040 m3, 1041 m3
1042 -- 1042 m3, 1043 m3, 1044 m3
1045 -- Volume of the Stingray Nebula = ~1.7×1045 m3

Volume of the bright inner nebula of the Cat's Eye Nebula = ~2.7×1046 m3
8.47×1047 m3 = 1 cubic light-year

1045 m3, 1046 m3, 1047 m3
1048 -- Volume of the Oort Cloud, assuming a radius of 50000 AU, = ~1.7×1048 m3

Volume of the Dumbbell Nebula = ~1.6×1049 m3
Volume of the Bubble Nebula in the Milky Way = ~4×1050 m3

1048 m3, 1049 m3, 1050 m3
1051 -- 1051 m3, 1052 m3, 1053 m3
1054 -- Volume of small dwarf galaxy like NGC 1705 = ~3×1055 m3

Volume of the Local Bubble, assuming a radius of 100 parsecs = ~3.3×1055 m3, about 39 million cubic light years

1054 m3, 1055 m3, 1056 m3
1057 -- Volume of dwarf galaxy like the Large Magellanic Cloud = ~3×1058 m3, about 35 × 109 cubic light years 1057 m3, 1058 m3, 1059 m3
1060 -- Volume of a galaxy like the Milky Way = ~3.3×1061 m3, about 39 × 1012 cubic light years 1060 m3, 1061 m3, 1062 m3
1063 -- Volume of whole Milky Way including Globes. 1063 m3, 1064 m3, 1065 m3
1066 -- Volume of the Local Group = ~5×1068 m3, about 15 million "Milky Way volumes" 1066 m3, 1067 m3, 1068 m3
1069 -- Volume of the Gemini Void = 6.7×1071 m3[2] or 20 × 109 "Milky Way volumes"
1069 m3, 1070 m3, 1071 m3
1072 -- Volume of the Local Void = 1.2×1072 m3, about 1.4×1024 cubic light years,[2] or 3.6×1010 "Milky Way volumes"

Volume of the Virgo Supercluster = 3.5×1072 m3[3]
Volume of the Sculptor Void = 1×1073 m3, about 1.1×1025 cubic light years,[2] or 3×1011 "Milky Way volumes"
Least volume of the Southern Local Supervoid = 2×1073 m3, about 2.2×1025 cubic light years,[4] or 6×1011 "Milky Way volumes"

1072 m3, 1073 m3, 1074 m3
1080 -- Approximate volume of the observable universe 3.4 ×1080 m3 1080 m3
1081 -- The universe is at least 21 times larger, roughly 7 ×1081 m3, than what is observable, according to a WMAP analysis [5] 1081 m3
10113 -- Upper bound on the physical size of the present universe, roughly 1 ×10113 m3; a result of the maximum number of Hubble volumes. [6] 10113 m3


  1. ^ 198000 square metres floor space from Structurae multiplied by the "Slab to Slab Height" of 4.20 metres from taipei-101.com.tw gives 831600 cubic metres. Floors one to eight can be approximated as 4300 square metres (from [1]) times 8 times 4.2 metres, or an additional 134400 cubic metres, giving an estimated 966000 cubic metres.
  2. ^ a b c An Atlas of the Universe. The Nearest Superclusters. Retrieved 2008-11-19
  3. ^ assuming it is a sphere of 100 million light year radius
  4. ^ Einasto, M (1994-07-15), "The Structure of the Universe Traced by Rich Clusters of Galaxies", Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 269, Bibcode:1994MNRAS.269..301E 
  5. ^ http://arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0605709v2 "How Many Universes Do There Need To Be?"
  6. ^ http://arxiv.org/pdf/1208.2924v1.pdf "On Cosmological Implications of Holographic Entropy Bound" p.4