1262

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1262 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar1262
MCCLXII
Ab urbe condita2015
Armenian calendar711
ԹՎ ՉԺԱ
Assyrian calendar6012
Balinese saka calendar1183–1184
Bengali calendar669
Berber calendar2212
English Regnal year46 Hen. 3 – 47 Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar1806
Burmese calendar624
Byzantine calendar6770–6771
Chinese calendar辛酉(Metal Rooster)
3958 or 3898
    — to —
壬戌年 (Water Dog)
3959 or 3899
Coptic calendar978–979
Discordian calendar2428
Ethiopian calendar1254–1255
Hebrew calendar5022–5023
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1318–1319
 - Shaka Samvat1183–1184
 - Kali Yuga4362–4363
Holocene calendar11262
Igbo calendar262–263
Iranian calendar640–641
Islamic calendar660–661
Japanese calendarKōchō 2
(弘長2年)
Javanese calendar1171–1173
Julian calendar1262
MCCLXII
Korean calendar3595
Minguo calendar650 before ROC
民前650年
Nanakshahi calendar−206
Thai solar calendar1804–1805
Tibetan calendar阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1388 or 1007 or 235
    — to —
阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
1389 or 1008 or 236

Year 1262 (MCCLXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By area[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • King Mangrai of the Lanna Kingdom (present day Northern Thailand, Shan State and Xishuangbanna Dai Autonomous Prefecture) founds the city of Chiang Rai, as the kingdom's capital.

Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and culture[edit]

Markets[edit]

  • The Venetian Senate starts consolidating all of the city's outstanding debt into a single fund, later known as the Monte Vecchio. The holders of the newly created prestiti are promised a 5% annual coupon. These claims can be sold, and quickly (before 1320) give rise to the first recorded secondary market for financial assets, in medieval Europe.[1]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Munro, John H. (2003). "The Medieval Origins of the Financial Revolution". The International History Review. 15 (3): 506–562.