1949 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1949 throughout the world.

Champions[edit]

Major League Baseball[edit]

Caribbean leagues[edit]

Caribbean World Series[edit]

Other champions[edit]

Awards and honors[edit]

MLB statistical leaders[edit]

American League National League
AVG George Kell DET .343 Jackie Robinson BRO .342
HR Ted Williams BOS 43 Ralph Kiner PIT 54
RBI Ted Williams BOS &
Vern Stephens BOS
159 Ralph Kiner PIT 127
Wins Mel Parnell BOS 25 Warren Spahn BSB 21
ERA Mike Garcia CLE 2.36 Dave Koslo NYG 2.50
Ks Virgil Trucks DET 153 Warren Spahn BSB 151

Major league baseball final standings[edit]

American League final standings[edit]

American League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st New York Yankees 97   57 .630    --
2nd Boston Red Sox 96   58 .623   1.0
3rd Cleveland Indians 89   65 .578   8.0
4th Detroit Tigers 87   67 .565 10.0
5th Philadelphia Athletics 81   73 .526 16.0
6th Chicago White Sox 63   91 .409 34.0
7th St. Louis Browns 53 101 .344 44.0
8th Washington Senators 50 104 .325 47.0

National League final standings[edit]

National League
Rank Club Wins Losses Win %   GB
1st Brooklyn Dodgers 97   57 .630    --
2nd St. Louis Cardinals 96   58 .623   1.0
3rd Philadelphia Phillies 81   73 .526 16.0
4th Boston Braves 75   79 .487 22.0
5th New York Giants 73   81 .474 24.0
6th Pittsburgh Pirates 71   83 .461 26.0
7th Cincinnati Reds 62   92 .403 35.0
8th Chicago Cubs 61   93 .396 36.0

Events[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

  • August 6 – Luke Appling appears in his 2,154th game as a shortstop, surpassing the major league mark set by Rabbit Maranville. Appling will finish his career with 2,218 games at SS.
  • August 8 – Carl Furillo returns to the Brooklyn Dodgers lineup after an injury and hits .431 in the final eight weeks of the season. He will finish at .322, fourth best in the NL.
  • August 9 – Dom DiMaggio's 34-game hitting streak is on the line against Vic Raschi and the New York Yankees. Hitless in his first four at-bats, Dom hits a sinking line drive in the eighth inning that his brother Joe catches at his shoetops. The Boston Red Sox win 6–3 to move 5½ games behind the Yankees. Dom had started his streak after going hitless against Raschi.
  • August 15 – Reports of clubhouse troubles trail the Boston Braves all season. Owner Lou Perini prevails on manager Billy Southworth to take a leave of absence. The team spurts briefly under Johnny Cooney but finishes under .500, in fourth place. Braves players vote Southworth only a half-share of last year's World Series earnings but commissioner Happy Chandler restores the full share.
  • August 21 – A barrage of bottles from the Shibe Park stands as protest of a decision by umpire George Barr over a trapped fly ball results in the first forfeiture in the major leagues in seven years. The New York Giants, who receive this 4–0 forfeit over the Philadelphia Phillies, gave one away in 1942 when hordes of youngsters invaded the Polo Grounds field.
  • August 22- The New York Giants sell veteran slugger Johnny Mize to the New York Yankees for $40,000.
  • August 27 – former Mexican League jumpers Max Lanier and Fred Martin drop their $2.5 million suit against Major League Baseball.

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Movies[edit]

Births[edit]

January[edit]

February[edit]

March[edit]

April[edit]

May[edit]

June[edit]

July[edit]

August[edit]

September[edit]

October[edit]

November[edit]

December[edit]

Deaths[edit]

January–March[edit]

  • January 9 – Harry McIntire, 69, NL pitcher for Brooklyn and Chicago, lost 20 games three times
  • February 10 – Johnny Bates, 66, outfielder for four NL teams, hit .305 for the Phillies in 1910
  • March 11 – Eric McNair, 39, infielder for four AL teams, hit .324 for the White Sox in 1939
  • March 15 – Bill Cissell, 45, middle infielder who struggled to overcome the high expectations of his $123,000 purchase from the minors in 1927
  • March 27 – Frank Gleich, 55, backup outfielder for the 1919–1920 New York Yankees
  • March 30 – Bill Bernhard, 78, one of the first pitchers to jump from the NL to the AL, later a 20-game winner for Cleveland and a minor league manager

April–June[edit]

  • April 4 – George Suggs, 66, pitcher, twice winner of 20 games
  • May 6 – Charlie Hallstrom, 85, pitched one game for the 1885 Providence Grays. One of four major league players to have been born in Sweden.
  • May 8 – Sam Breadon, 72, owner of the St. Louis Cardinals from 1920 to 1947
  • June 12 – Oliver Marcelle, 53, star third baseman in the Negro Leagues
  • June 14 – Charley Moran, 71, umpire in the National League from 1918 to 1939 who worked in four World Series; played for the Cardinals in 1903 and 1908, and coached football at several colleges
  • June 25 – Buck Freeman, 77, outfielder who led both NL and AL in home runs, batted .300 four times

July–September[edit]

  • July 23 – John Anderson, 75, Norwegian outfielder who led NL in triples and AL in steals
  • August 22 – Chief Zimmer, 88, catcher for 19 seasons, 13 with the Cleveland Spiders, batted .300 four times
  • September 9 – Hal Neubauer, 47, pitcher who played for the 1925 Boston Red Sox
  • September 12 – Sherry Smith, 58, pitcher who lost a 14-inning game 2-1 to Babe Ruth in 1916 World Series, pitched 3-hitter in 1920 Series
  • September 15 – Tiny Bonham, 36, All-Star pitcher, won 103 games for Yankees and Pirates; died following an appendectomy

October–December[edit]

  • October 1 – Eddie Kolb, 69, pitched one game in the Majors, the last game for the Cleveland Spiders; later went on to successful ventures in semi-pro baseball and the oil business in Canada.
  • October 2 – Wildfire Schulte, 67, right fielder for the Cubs, won NL's 1911 MVP award, stole home 22 times
  • October 3 – John Donahue, 55, right fielder for the 1923 Boston Red Sox
  • October 19 – Bill Steele, 63, pitcher for the St. Louis Cardinals 1910–1914
  • October 20 – Dick Rudolph, 62, spitball pitcher won 121 games for Boston Braves, also first and last games of 1914 World Series
  • November 11 – Brick Owens, 64, American League umpire from 1916 to 1937 who officiated in five World Series and the 1934 All-Star Game