1956 in baseball

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The following are the baseball events of the year 1956 throughout the world.

List of years in baseball
  • 1953
  • 1954
  • 1955
  • 1956
  • 1957
  • 1958
  • 1959
  • Champions[edit]

    Major League Baseball[edit]

    Other champions[edit]

    Winter Leagues

    Awards and honors[edit]

    Major League Baseball statistical leaders[edit]

    American League National League
    AVG Mickey Mantle1 NYY .353 Hank Aaron MIL .324
    HR Mickey Mantle1 NYY 52 Duke Snider BKN 43
    RBI Mickey Mantle1 NYY 130 Stan Musial STL 109
    Wins Frank Lary DET 21 Don Newcombe BKN 27
    ERA Whitey Ford NYY 2.47   Lew Burdette MIL 2.70  
    Ks Herb Score CLE 263 Sam Jones CHC 176

    1 Major League Triple Crown Batting Winner

    Major league baseball final standings[edit]

    Events[edit]

    January[edit]

    February[edit]

    • February   6 – Supporting the Wagner-Cashmore plan to build a $30-million downtown Brooklyn sports center, Brooklyn Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley promises to buy four million dollars worth of bonds.

    March[edit]

    • March 3 – In an effort to keep the New York Giants at home, Manhattan Borough president Hulan Jack makes plans for a new 110,000-seat stadium over the New York Central railroad tracks, on a 470,000-foot site stretching from 60th to 72nd streets on Manhattan's West Side. The estimated cost of $75 million for the ballpark eventually dooms the project and will be a major factor for Giants owner Horace Stoneham's decision to move the club to San Francisco in 1957.

    April[edit]

    May[edit]

    • May   2 – At Wrigley Field, the New York Giants defeat the Chicago Cubs, 6-5, in a 17-inning game in which 48 players see action–25 Giants and 23 Cubs. Chicago's Don Hoak sets a National League record by striking out six times in the game, which also features a record 11 intentional walks, including two each to the Giants' Willie Mays and Wes Westrum and the Cubs' Ernie Banks.
    • May 12 – Carl Erskine tosses the second no-hitter of his career as the Brooklyn Dodgers blank the New York Giants, 3–0, at Ebbets Field. His first no-hitter came on June 19, 1952 against the Chicago Cubs at Ebbets Field.
    • May 26 – Al Simmons died in Milwaukee, at the age of 54. A former Philadelphia Athletics outfielder as well as a three-time All-Star and two-time champion bat, Simmons posted a .334 average with 307 home runs and 1827 RBI in a 20-season major league career that included stints with six other teams besides the Athletics. Simmons was enshrined into the Hall of Fame in 1953.
    • May 30 – Mickey Mantle of the New York Yankees narrowly misses hitting the first home run ever hit completely out of Yankee Stadium. With Hank Bauer and Gil McDougald on base in the fifth inning of Game One of a doubleheader against the Washington Senators, Mantle, batting left-handed against Pedro Ramos, hits a towering drive above the level of the stadium roof. However, a stiff wind cuts down the ball, which strikes the right-field facade, 18 inches (460 mm) above the level of the roof. The home run gives the Yankees a 3-1 lead; they go on to win 4-3.

    June[edit]

    July[edit]

    August[edit]

    September[edit]

    October[edit]

    November[edit]

    • November 27:
      • Don Newcombe, who posted a 27-7 record with 139 strikeouts and a 3.06 ERA for the National League pennant-winning Brooklyn Dodgers, becomes the first MLB Cy Young Award winner. Only one pitcher will be selected each season for this prestigious pitching award until 1967, when each league will name a winner.
      • Outfielder Charlie Peete, given a good shot at being the first black starter on the St. Louis Cardinals, is killed in a plane crash in Caracas, Venezuela. Peete, who hit .192 in 23 games for St. Louis in 1956, was returning from playing winter ball.
    • November 28 – The Cleveland Indians name Kerby Farrell to replace Al López as the team manager. Farrell won the Junior World Series as the pilot of the Double-A Indianapolis Indians.

    December[edit]

    Births[edit]

    January[edit]

    February[edit]

    March[edit]

    April[edit]

    May[edit]

    June[edit]

    July[edit]

    August[edit]

    September[edit]

    October[edit]

    November[edit]

    December[edit]

    Deaths[edit]

    January[edit]

    • January   4 – John Beckwith, 55, All-Star shortstop and manager in the Negro Leagues, who spent over 20 years in baseball, ranking among the Negro Leagues' career leaders in batting average, home runs, RBI and slugging percentage.[2]
    • January   7 – Davey Claire, 58, shortstop who appeared in three games for the Detroit Tigers in 1920.
    • January 10 – Algie McBride, 86, outfielder for the Chicago Colts, Cincinnati Reds, and New York Giants from 1896 to 1901.
    • January 22 − Ralph Mitterling, 65, outfielder for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1916 season.
    • January 23 – Billy Evans, 71, American League umpire from 1906 to 1927, later the general manager of the Indians and Tigers.
    • January 26 – Dave Howard, 66, second baseman who played with the Washington Senators in the 1912 season and for the Brooklyn Tip-Tops in 1915.
    • January 31 – Buck Weaver, 65, shortstop and third baseman who played his entire career for the Chicago White Sox from 1912 to 1920, also a member of the 1917 World champion White Sox, then was one of the eight players banned from the Major Leagues for his connection to the 1919 Black Sox scandal.[3]

    February[edit]

    • February   8 – Roy Hitt, 71, pitcher for the 1907 Cincinnati Reds.
    • February   8 – Tom Hughes, 77, pitcher for the Chicago Orphans at the turn of the 20th century as well as one of the first World Series pitchers ever, in 1903, with the Boston Americans champion team.
    • February   8 – Connie Mack, 93, whose 65 years in baseball began as a catcher with the Washington Nationals in 1886, later a manager and owner of the Philadelphia Athletics from 1901 through 1950, retiring with nine American League pennants, five World Series titles and a record 3,731 victories – a feat that is unlikely to ever be matched, being inducted to the Hall of Fame in 1937.[4]
    • February 11 – Joseph Myers, 73, pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1905 season.
    • February 13 – Fred Holmes, 77, first baseman and catcher who played with the New York Highlanders in the 1904 season and for the Chicago Cubs in 1904.
    • February 14 – Bill Bishop, 55, pitcher who played for the Philadelphia Athletics during the 1921 season.
    • February 17 – Kip Selbach, 83, solid defensive outfielder who played for six different teams in a span of 13 seasons from 1894–1906, posting an overall batting line of .293/.377/.412 and 334 stolen bases, while leading the National League with 22 triples in 1895.[5]
    • February 19 – Ray Demmitt, 72, backup outfielder who played with five teams in part of seven seasons spanning 1909–1919.
    • February 23 – Pete Loos, 77, pitcher for the Philadelphia Athletics of the American League in its 1901 season.
    • February 25 – Jack Lewis, 72, second baseman who played with the Boston Red Sox in 1911 and for the Pittsburgh Rebels of the outlaw Federal League from 1914 to 1915.

    March[edit]

    • March   1 – Ed Heusser, 46, pitcher for four teams in nine seasons between 1935 and 1948, who led the National League pitchers with a 2.38 ERA in 1944.
    • March   1 – Walt Miller, 72, pitcher who appeared in three games for the Brooklyn Dodgers in the 1911 season.
    • March   2 – Fred Merkle, 67, slugging first baseman and part-time outfielder who was in the major leagues from 1907 through 1926, playing with the New York Giants, Brooklyn Dodgers, Chicago Cubs and New York Yankees, being best remembered for his famous and controversial baserunning blunder as a 19-year rookie in 1908 that likely cost the Giants the National League pennant.[6]
    • March   4 – Frank Kelliher, 56, pinch-hitter who appeared in just one game with the Washington Senators in 1919.
    • March   5 – Bruce Ogrodowski, 44, backup catcher for the St. Louis Cardinals in part of two seasons from 1936–1937.
    • March   6 – Joe Berger, 69, part-time infielder for the Chicago White Sox in the 1913 and 1914 seasons.
    • March   7 – Shorty Desjardien, 62, pitcher for the Cleveland indians in 1916, who is regarded as one of the best all-around athletes ever produced by the University of Chicago, while playing on Western Conference championship teams in both football and baseball, and competing also in basketball and track and field tournaments.
    • March 10 – Solly Hofman, 73, an above-average center fielder and one of the Deadball Era's finest utility men, who spent 14 seasons with five Major League teams between 1903 and 1916, while garnering attention as a timely hitter, his speed on the bases, and spectacular catches in outfield.[7]
    • March 14 – Lena Styles, 56, catcher who played with the Philadelphia Athletics and Cincinnati Reds over parts of five seasons from 1919–1931.
    • March 20 – Ed Smith, 77, pitcher for the St. Louis Browns during the 1906 season.

    April[edit]

    May[edit]

    • May   3 – Karl Kolseth, 63, first baseman who played in 1915 for the Baltimore Terrapins of the Federal League.
    • May   4 – Gus Dorner, 79, pitcher for the Boston Beaneaters, Cincinnati Reds and Cleveland Naps in a span of six seasons between 1902 and 1909.
    • May   5 – John Godwin, 79, infield/outfield utility man for the Boston Americans in the 1905 and 1906 seasons.
    • May   6 – Harry Ostdiek, 75, backup catcher who played with the Cleveland Naps in the 1904 season and for the Boston Red Sox in 1908.
    • May   7 – Tommy Atkins, 68, pitcher who played from 1909 to 1910 for the Philadelphia Athletics.
    • May 10 – Jimmy Slagle, 82, outfielder who played for four National League clubs in 10 seasons from 1899–1908, winning two World Series rings with the Chicago Cubs in 1907 and 1908.
    • May 22 – Harry Howell, 79, notorious spitballer who pitched with six teams from 1898 to 1910, helping the Brooklyn Superbas win the 1900 National League pennant and becoming the best pitcher of the St. Louis Browns (now Baltimore Orioles) during the Deadball Era, establishing a franchise record for career ERA (2.06) that has never been equaled.[8]
    • May 27 – Freddy Sale, 54, pitcher who appeared in just one game with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1924.
    • May 26 – Al Simmons, 54, slugging Hall of Fame left fielder for seven clubs from 1924–1944, most prominently for Connie Mack and his fearsome Philadelphia Athletics of the late 1920s and early 1930s, who topped the American League with a .387 batting average, 24 home runs and 129 runs batted in and 253 hits in 1925, expanding his production in the next three seasons with averages of .341, a league-best .392, and .351, driving in 109, 108 and 107 runs, respectively, while guiding the Athletics to the American League pennant from 1929 through 1931, and World Series titles the first two of those years, ending his career with a .334 batting average, 2,927 hits, 307 home runs and 1,827 RBI, all with an unconventional batting stance that earned him the nickname 'Bucketfoot Al' because his stride took him toward third base.[9]

    June[edit]

    July[edit]

    August[edit]

    September[edit]

    October[edit]

    November[edit]

    December[edit]

    Sources[edit]

    1. ^ Conklin, William R. "Hoboken Fete Takes Baseball Back 110 Years; Cartwright Plaque Is Unveiled at Site of Elysian Fields Rudd Determined to Speak 300 Watch Ceremony Honored in Hall of Fame", The New York Times, June 20, 1956. Accessed March 9, 2018.
    2. ^ Negro League Featured Piece – John Beckwith. Article by Kyle McNary. Baseball History Comes Alive¡ website. Retrieved on March 5, 2018.
    3. ^ Buck Weaver. Article by David Fletcher. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 5, 2018.
    4. ^ Connie Mack article. Baseball Hall of Fame website. Retrieved on March 5, 2018.
    5. ^ Kip Selbach. Article by Bill Nowlin. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 6, 2018.
    6. ^ Fred Merkle. Article by Trey Strecker SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 6, 2018.
    7. ^ Solly Hofman. Article by Trey Strecker. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 6, 2018.
    8. ^ Harry Howell. Article by Eric Sallee.SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 7, 2018.
    9. ^ Al Simmons. Article by Fred Stein. SABR Biography Project. Retrieved on March 7, 2018.

    External links[edit]