Dorothy Espelage

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Dorothy Espelage is an American psychologist. She is the William C. Friday Distinguished Professor of Education at the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill), and an international expert in bullying, youth aggression, and teen dating violence.[1][2][3] She has authored several books including Bullying in North American Schools, Bullying Prevention and Intervention: Realistic Strategies for Schools, and Handbook of Bullying in Schools: an International Perspective.[4]

Education[edit]

Espelage grew up in Virginia and received her bachelor's degree in psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University. She then received a master's degree in clinical psychology from Radford University before receiving her PhD in counseling psychology from Indiana University.[5] From 1997 to 2016 she worked at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, where she held the Edward William and Jane Marr Gutgsell professorship in educational psychology.[6] In 2016, she accepted a position in the department of psychology at the University of Florida.[7]

Professional life[edit]

Espelage has appeared as a speaker and consultant in numerous media outlets such as CNN, Anderson Cooper, Oprah, Huffington Post, and USA Today.[8][9][10][11][12] Recently, she was invited to the White House in 2011 as a part of the Bullying Summit to discuss policy decisions regarding aggression in schools. Likewise, she was awarded the lifetime achievement award from the American Psychological Association's Division 17 for Counseling Psychology.[13][14] As the author of over 200 publications, Espelage is known for her work in bullying, homophobic teasing, sexual harassment, and teen dating violence.[15] In particular, her research focuses on translating empirical findings into prevention and intervention programming. As a result, Espelage regularly speaks at conferences and schools to teachers, parents, and children about why bullying occurs, why bystanders do not assist victims, and what individuals can do to respond to stop school bullying, harassment, and violence.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Dorothy Espelage | College of Education | U of I". Education.illinois.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  2. ^ "Dr. Dorothy Espelage". Dorothyespelage.com. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-02-21. Retrieved 2014-02-10.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-02-27. Retrieved 2014-12-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ "Biography of Dr. Dorothy Espelage for Appearances, Speaking Engagements". Allamericanspeakers.com. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  6. ^ "Two education professors named as Illinois Gutgsell professors | College of Education | U of I". Education.illinois.edu. 2013-10-18. Archived from the original on 2014-02-03. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  7. ^ "Dr. Dorothy Espelage, Ph.D." www.psych.ufl.edu. Retrieved 2017-02-24.
  8. ^ "Sexual Bullying". Oprah.com. 2009-05-06. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  9. ^ "College of Education News". Illinois.edu. 2011-10-06. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  10. ^ "Studies show cyberbullying concerns have been overstated". USATODAY.COM. Retrieved 2020-01-16.
  11. ^ "Study: Bullying rampant in U.S. middle schools - August 20, 1999". CNN. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  12. ^ "HuffPost Live". Live.huffingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  13. ^ joehammer. "Counseling Psychologists Receive Endowed Professorships » Society of Counseling Psychology, Division 17". Div17.org. Archived from the original on 2014-12-18. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  14. ^ "Keynote Address: Dr. Dorothy Espelage, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign - 9:15-9:50 - Page 2". Bvcbullyingproject.net. Archived from the original on 2015-10-03. Retrieved 2014-01-20.
  15. ^ Robinson, J. P.; Espelage, D. L. (2013). "Dorothy L Espelage - Publications". American Journal of Public Health. 103 (10): 1810–9. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2013.301387. PMC 3780741. PMID 23947999.