Flag of Rwanda

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Republic of Rwanda
Flag of Rwanda.svg
UseNational flag Small vexillological symbol or pictogram in black and white showing the different uses of the flag
Proportion2:3
AdoptedOctober 25, 2001; 20 years ago (2001-10-25)
DesignA horizontal tricolour of light blue (double width), yellow and green; charged with a sun-yellow sun in the upper-fly side corner
Designed byAlphonse Kirimobenecyo
Rwandan flag

The flag of Rwanda (Kinyarwanda: ibendera ry'Urwanda) was adopted on October 25, 2001.

Details[edit]

The flag has three colours: blue, yellow, and green,[1] The light blue band represents happiness and peace, the yellow band symbolizes economic development, and the green band symbolizes the hope of prosperity. The yellow sun represents enlightenment.[2]

The flag represents national unity, respect for work, heroism, and confidence in the future. According to the state's official rationale, the flag was adopted (along with a new national anthem at the time) to avoid connotations to the 1994 genocide which it stated the previous one embodied.[3] However, some Rwandans at the time expressed doubts about the reasoning and viewed it as an attempt by the ruling Rwandan Patriotic Front to express its political power by changing state symbols.[4] The flag was designed by Alphonse Kirimobenecyo.[5]

When hung vertically, the flag should be displayed as the horizontal version rotated clockwise 90 degrees.[1]

Previous flag[edit]

Rwanda's previous flag was a red-yellow-green tricolour with a large black letter "R" (to distinguish it from the otherwise identical flag of Guinea, with the "R" standing for Rwanda). Derived from the flag of Ethiopia, the colours green, yellow, and red represented peace, the nation's hope for its development, and the people. The colours were associated with Pan-African colours. The flag was changed because it ostensibly became associated with the brutality of the 1994 genocide.[3][2] However, some Rwandans at the time expressed doubts about the stated reasoning and merely viewed all this as an attempt by the ruling Rwandan Patriotic Front to assert its political power by changing established state symbols.[6]

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Flags and Anthems Manual: London 2012 (PDF). London, United Kingdom: London Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games. 2012. p. 88. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-01-04. Retrieved 4 January 2015.
  2. ^ a b "Flags of the World: Rwanda". CRW Flags of the World. 20 November 2013. Retrieved 21 February 2014.
  3. ^ a b Vesperini, Helen (31 December 2001). "Rwanda unveils new flag and anthem". BBC. Archived from the original on 5 November 2003. Retrieved 5 November 2003.
  4. ^ Burnet, Jennie E. (19 November 2012). Genocide Lives in Us: Women, Memory, and Silence in Rwanda. ISBN 9780299286439. Retrieved 17 September 2021.
  5. ^ "Flags of Africa — Countries Starting with R". Retrieved 24 March 2014.
  6. ^ Burnet, Jennie E. (19 November 2012). Genocide Lives in Us: Women, Memory, and Silence in Rwanda. ISBN 9780299286439. Retrieved 7 May 2022.
  7. ^ Nyrop 1969, p. 23.
  8. ^ "What Could Have Motivated The 1961 Gitarama Coup In Rwanda?". Taarifa. 6 November 2018. Retrieved 22 September 2021.

External links[edit]