Florida's 19th congressional district

Coordinates: 26°25′54″N 81°54′24″W / 26.43167°N 81.90667°W / 26.43167; -81.90667
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Florida's 19th congressional district
Map
Interactive map of district boundaries since January 3, 2023
Representative
  Byron Donalds
RNaples
Area1,367[1] sq mi (3,540 km2)
Distribution
  • 96.3% urban[2]
  • 3.7% rural
Population (2022)802,244[3]
Median household
income
$76,223[3]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+13[4]

Florida's 19th congressional district is a U.S. congressional district in Southwest Florida. It includes the cities of Cape Coral, Fort Myers, Fort Myers Beach, Sanibel, Bonita Springs, Naples and Marco Island, as well as unincorporated areas in Lee and Collier counties. It has been represented by Republican Byron Donalds since 2021.

The 19th district was created as a result of the redistricting cycle after the 1980 census. From then until 1993, it was a Miami-based district; much of its territory is now the 25th district. From 1993 to 2013, it covered parts of Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach; this area is now the 23rd district. The current 19th covers most of the territory that was the 14th district from 1993 to 2013.

Voting[edit]

Year Results
2008 John McCain 56.8% – Barack Obama 42.3%
2012 Mitt Romney 60.5% – Barack Obama 38.7%
2016 Donald Trump 59.6% – Hillary Clinton 37.5%
2020 Donald Trump 59.7% – Joe Biden 39.6%

List of members representing the district[edit]

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location
District created January 3, 1983

Dante Fascell
(Miami)
Democratic January 3, 1983 –
January 3, 1993
98th
99th
100th
101st
102nd
Redistricted from the 15th district and re-elected in 1982.
Re-elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Retired.
1983–1993
[data missing]

Harry Johnston
(Boynton Beach)
Democratic January 3, 1993 –
January 3, 1997
103rd
104th
Redistricted from the 14th district and re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Retired.
1993–2003
[data missing]

Robert Wexler
(Boca Raton)
Democratic January 3, 1997 –
January 3, 2010
105th
106th
107th
108th
109th
110th
111th
Elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Re-elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Resigned to become president of the Center for Middle East Peace and Economic Cooperation.
2003–2013
Based in South Florida.
Parts of Palm Beach County and Broward County, including the cities of Coral Springs, Margate and Greenacres.
Vacant January 3, 2010 –
April 13, 2010
111th

Ted Deutch
(Boca Raton)
Democratic April 13, 2010 –
January 3, 2013
111th
112th
Elected to finish Wexler's term.
Re-elected later in 2010.
Redistricted to the 21st district.

Trey Radel
(Fort Myers)
Republican January 3, 2013 –
January 27, 2014
113th Elected in 2012.
Resigned.
2013–2023
Located in Southwest Florida.
Including Cape Coral, Fort Myers, Naples and Marco Island.
Vacant January 27, 2014 –
June 25, 2014

Curt Clawson
(Bonita Springs)
Republican June 25, 2014 –
January 3, 2017
113th
114th
Elected to finish Radel's term.
Re-elected later in 2014.
Retired.[5]

Francis Rooney
(Naples)
Republican January 3, 2017 –
January 3, 2021
115th
116th
Elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Retired.

Byron Donalds
(Naples)
Republican January 3, 2021 –
present
117th
118th
Elected in 2020.
Re-elected in 2022.
2023–present

Election results[edit]

2002[edit]

2002 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida: District 19
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert Wexler (Incumbent) 156,747 72.16%
Republican Jack Merkle 60,477 27.84%
Majority 96,720 44.32%
Turnout 217,224
Democratic hold

2004[edit]

2004 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida: District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Robert Wexler (Incumbent) 202,345 100% +27.84%
Majority 202,345 100% +55.68%
Turnout 202,345 -6.85%
Democratic hold Swing [?]

2006[edit]

2006 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida: District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Robert Wexler (Incumbent) 178,456 100%
Majority 178,456 100%
Turnout 178,456 -11.8%
Democratic hold Swing [?]

2008[edit]

2008 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida: District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Robert Wexler (Incumbent) 202,465 66.16% -33.84%
Republican Edward Lynch 83,357 27.24% +27.24%
Independent Benjamin Graber 20,214 6.61% +6.61%
Majority 119,108 38.92% -61.08%
Turnout 306,036 +71.49%
Democratic hold Swing [?]

2010 (Special)[edit]

2010 Florida's 19th congressional district special election
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Ted Deutch 43,269 62.06% -4.10%
Republican Edward Lynch 24,549 35.21% +7.97%
Independent Jim McCormick 1,905 2.73% +2.73%
Majority 18,720 26.85% -12.07%
Turnout 69,723 -77.22%
Democratic hold Swing [?]

2010[edit]

2010 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida: District 19
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Ted Deutch (Incumbent) 132,098 62.59% +0.53%
Republican Joe Budd 78,733 37.30% +2.09%
Write-In Others 228 0.11% +0.11%
Majority 53,365 25.29% -1.56%
Turnout 211,059 +202.71%
Democratic hold Swing [?]

2012[edit]

Florida 19th Congressional District 2012[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Trey Radel 189,833 62.0%
Democratic Jim Roach 109,746 35.8%
No Party Affiliation Brandon M. Smith 6,637 2.2%
Total votes 306,216
Turnout  
Republican gain from Democratic

2014 (Special)[edit]

Florida's 19th Congressional District special election, 2014[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Curt Clawson 66,922 66.9%
Democratic April Freeman 29,314 29.3%
Libertarian Ray Netherwood 3,729 3.7%
Write-In Timothy J. Rossano 24 0.0%
Total votes 99,989
Republican hold

2014[edit]

Florida's 19th Congressional District Election (2014)[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Curt Clawson (Incumbent) 159,354 64.6%
Democratic April Freeman 80,824 32.7%
Libertarian Ray Netherwood 6,671 2.7%
Write-In Timothy J. Rossano 12 0.0%
Total votes 246,861
Turnout  
Republican hold

2016[edit]

Florida's 19th Congressional District Election (2016)[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Francis Rooney 239,225 65.9%
Democratic Robert M. Neeld 123,812 34.1%
Write-In David Byron 109 0%
Write-In Timothy John Rossano 20 0%
Total votes 363,166
Republican hold

2018[edit]

2018 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Francis Rooney (incumbent) 211,465 62.3%
Democratic David Holden 128,106 37.7%
Independent Pete Pollard (write-in) 36 0.0%
Total votes 339,607 100.0%
Republican hold

2020[edit]

2020 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Byron Donalds 272,440 61.27%
Democratic Cindy Banyai 172,146 38.72%
Independent Patrick Post (write-in) 3 0.01%
Total votes 444,589 100.0%
Republican hold

2022[edit]

2022 United States House of Representatives elections in Florida
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Byron Donalds (incumbent) 213,035 68.01%
Democratic Cindy Banyai 100,226 31.99%
Independent Patrick Post (write-in) 13 0%
Total votes 313,274 100.0%
Republican hold

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Congressional Plan--SC14-1905 (Ordered by The Florida Supreme Court, 2-December-2015)" (PDF). Florida Senate Committee on Reapportionment. Retrieved January 11, 2017.
  2. ^ "Congressional Districts Relationship Files (State-based) - Geography - U.S. Census Bureau". Archived from the original on April 2, 2013. Retrieved February 4, 2018.
  3. ^ a b Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  4. ^ "2022 Cook PVI: District Map and List". Cook Political Report. Retrieved January 10, 2023.
  5. ^ King, Ledyard (May 20, 2016). "U.S. Rep. Curt Clawson won't seek re-election". The News-Press. Retrieved June 16, 2016.
  6. ^ "Florida Department of State - Election Results: November 6, 2012 General Election". Florida Department of State Department of Elections. Retrieved March 31, 2013.
  7. ^ "Florida Department of State - Election Results: June 24, 2014 Special General Congressional 19". Florida Department of State Department of Elections. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  8. ^ "Florida Department of State - Election Results: November 4, 2014 General Election". Florida Department of State Department of Elections. Retrieved June 18, 2016.
  9. ^ "Florida Election Watch - Home Page". floridaelectionwatch.gov.

26°25′54″N 81°54′24″W / 26.43167°N 81.90667°W / 26.43167; -81.90667