Hurontario-Main LRT

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Hurontario-Main LRT
Highway 401 at Hurontario Street 9192877703.jpg
Looking north at Hurontario St/Highway 401 interchange
Type Light rail
Status Approved
Locale Mississauga, Brampton
Termini Brampton Gateway Terminal
Port Credit GO Station
Opened 2022 (projected)[1]
Owner Metrolinx
Line length 20 km (12 mi)
Route map
Brampton Gateway Terminal
Sir Lou
Ray Lawson
Highway 407
Hwy 407 Maintenance Yard
Highway 407
Highway 401
Highway 403
Mississauga Transitway
at Station Gate
Mississauga City Centre
Square One
Duke of York
Robert Speck
at Main Street
Matthews Gate
Central Parkway
Cooksville GO Transit logo.svg Milton line GO logo.png
North Service
Port Credit GO Transit logo.svg Lakeshore West logo.png

The Hurontario-Main LRT is a planned light rail line in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada, that extends into Brampton, Ontario. This line will run along Hurontario Street. Due to the involvement of two transit agencies in this project, it is currently unclear which agency will operate the line; however, it is likely that Metrolinx will own the line.[2]

The Cities of Mississauga and Brampton have identified higher-order transit along Hurontario due to the chronic overcrowding situation in Mississauga's (and the surburban Greater Toronto Area's) busiest bus route, 19 Hurontario, which carries more than 25,000 passengers a day, combined with the massive-scale high-density development proposals along the corridor and the anticipated high growth in both cities. They have identified three options: light rail transit for the entire corridor, bus rapid transit for the entire corridor, or a combination of both (light rail south of Mississauga City Centre and bus rapid transit north of it).[3] After three public information sessions, the residents of both cities agreed overwhelmingly in favour of light rail transit along the full length of the corridor.[4]

The LRT line will cost around $1.6 billion.[5] On April 21, 2015, the Government of Ontario announced that it would completely fund the line, not including local capital costs such as utility relocations, surface upgrades, and landscaping.[6][1][7]

On October 28, 2015, Brampton City Council voted against allowing the Hurontario-Main LRT to run along the Main Street portion of the route because of concerns of low ridership projections and because of preferences for an LRT along some alternate route. Thus, the LRT will terminate at Steeles Avenue (Brampton Gateway Terminal) instead of Brampton GO Station.[8]

Construction is expected to commence in 2018, and the line is projected to enter service in 2022.[1]


The Hurontario LRT line will run for 20 kilometres (12 mi) in 40 minutes,[9] estimated to account for 35.2 million trips in 2031.[2][10][11]

The LRT line will run from the intersection of Port Street and Elizabeth Street for better access in the waterfront. The line will then turn left at St. Lawrence Drive. North of Lakeshore Road, St. Lawrence Drive becomes Hurontario Street. At Park Street, the LRT will directly connect to a relocated Port Credit GO Station. The line continues northward crossing Queen Elizabeth Way. At Dundas Street, it will connect to a proposed rapid transit line (either a BRT or an LRT). The LRT will indirectly connect to Cooksville GO Station using the LRT stop at John Street. The line continues northward until it splits into two branches between Burnhamthorpe Road and Rathburn Road:

  • Downtown alignment: from Hurontario Street, the LRT will turn left at Burnhamthorpe Road, turn right at Duke of York Boulevard, then turn right at Rathburn Road, then turn left and meet up with the other branch at a location yet to be determined. This branch serves almost all of Mississauga City Centre using a walking distance of 500 metres (1,600 ft), including those who are transferring to the BRT and City Centre Transit Terminal.
  • Mainline alignment: the route continues straight along Hurontario Street. This branch serves passengers working in the offices in the eastern part of the City Centre and those who want to bypass Downtown Mississauga and allow faster through travel along Hurontario Street.

From Rathburn Road, the LRT will bridge over Highway 403. At Highway 407, the LRT will connect to GO Transit's proposed Highway 407 Transitway. The line will then end at Steeles Avenue where it connects to Shoppers World Terminal to connect with Züm Steeles BRT line.


As of the second Public Information Centre, the LRT will have a dedicated right-of-way throughout the entire corridor, except for a few sections at the segment north of Nanwood Drive, where the segregated right-of-way has been removed to allow left-turn or right-turn lanes. As a result, road space along most of the corridor will be reallocated from two car lanes to the LRT, leaving four lanes for automotive traffic. Some narrower sections of Hurontario Street will be reduced to one car lane per direction. These sections include:[9][10]

  • Port Credit,
  • Duke of York Boulevard.

The corridor will have their median lanes taken away for the LRT with some exceptions. Those are:[9][10]

  • Port Street, where two lanes at the south side will be taken away,
  • Duke of York Boulevard, where two lanes at the east side will be taken away,
  • Hurontario Street between Inglewood Drive and Lakeshore Road, where two lanes to the west side will be used for LRT, with a new bridge at Eaglewood Boulevard to compensate for the proposed removal of the intersection at Inglewood Drive.
  • Rathburn Road, which will be widened at the south side, with two lanes taken away at the north side for the LRT.


The LRT line can have a few modifications along the route as it enters the later phases of the study:[2]

  • The LRT line is designed to perform short turns within Mississauga City Centre from both Brampton and Port Credit in case of accidents, closures or high ridership loads.
  • Within Mississauga City Centre, the LRT may cross Highway 403 in two ways:[9]
    • the mainline branch turns left at Square One Drive, then turns right to City Centre Drive, then meets with the downtown branch at Rathburn Road, then cross Highway 403 using a new bridge.
    • the downtown branch meets with the mainline branch at Hurontario Street north of Rathburn Road, requiring the Hurontario Street bridge to be widened to accommodate the LRT.
  • Mayor Susan Fennell of Brampton proposed to run the 502 Zum Main along the entire LRT route to Port Credit. Mayor Hazel McCallion of Mississauga rejected the alternative proposal, citing gridlock south of Mississauga City Centre as a reason.[12]

Main Street Cancellation[edit]

On October 28, 2015, Brampton City Council voted 7-4 against allowing the Hurontario-Main LRT to run along Main Street through its heritage downtown area, as originally planned by the province. Without this agreement, the province has indicate it will move ahead with the project, terminating the LRT at Steeles Avenue (Brampton Gateway Terminal) instead of Brampton GO Station.[8]

Proponents said the Main Street route advocated by the province would have revived the city’s struggling downtown core. However, opponents argued that the Main Street route lacked potential for ridership and future growth.[8] According to City of Brampton's transit ridership data, the current ridership along Main Street has an average of 200 riders per hour per direction on weekdays and Brampton’s downtown has a ridership of about 450 passengers an hour.[13]

Councillors opposing the Main Street route have proposed running the LRT east or west along Steeles Avenue and then north to Queen Street where it would then possibly continue east from Brampton's downtown area to the Bramalea GO Station or possibly all the way to the Vaughan subway extension. Although all councillors were in support of an LRT, they disagreed on the route it should take.[14]

MetroLinx CEO Bruce McCuaig said the provincial money allocated to the Main Street route in Brampton would now be available for other transit projects across the province. However, McCuaig also said Metrolinx would be open to evaluate alternate transit proposals from Brampton for provincial funding for the next round of transit initiatives.[8]

On November 3, 2015, Transportation Minister Steven Del Duca announced that the funding for the cancelled Main Street route will be invested in priority transit projects in the Greater Toronto Area which might or might not include Brampton.[15]



The LRT is planned to run every 5 minutes during rush hours, and every 10 minutes for the rest of the week. Service hours on the LRT corridor is planned to be between 5:00 AM and 1:30 AM Mondays to Saturdays and 7:00 AM to 12:00 AM on Sundays and holidays. Bus service is expected to supplement the remaining hours, making the Hurontario-Main corridor have a 24/7 transit operation. The LRT will take 40 minutes to travel the whole route, compared to 58 minutes using the private automobile.[9]


The LRT vehicle will be 30 metres in length, carrying up to 200 passengers. However, the LRT is planned to have 3-car trains, carrying up to 600 people. This configuration matches the 90-metre platforms to be built for the LRT stations.[9]

Typical Traction Power Substations (TPSS)[edit]

The LRT will have between 15 to 21 substations, which will be distributed evenly throughout the corridor. These substations convert electricity from the local power sources to the levels needed by the LRT vehicles. The LRT will operate on either 750 or 1500 volts of power.[9]

Storage and Maintenance[edit]

The LRT vehicles will be stored and maintained at a new facility at the hydro corridor adjacent to Highway 407, located next to the proposed Highway 407 Transitway Station.[9]


Hurontario-Main Street Corridor Interim Service Plan
Route Terminus Service Span and Average Frequency Connecting Services
AM Rush Midday PM Rush Evening Saturdays Sundays
Hurontario Express
Port Credit GO Station Shoppers World Terminal 10 10 10 20 24 - Brampton Transit
GO Transit
Züm Main
City Centre Transit Terminal Sandalwood Parkway 9 14 9 20 20 20
Highway 407 Park and Ride Heart Lake Terminal 20 20 20 30 30 30
Port Credit GO Station 19 to Highway 407 Park and Ride 6 12 8 16 6 12 11.5 11.5 8 16 13 13
Trillium Health Centre 19A to Britannia Road 24 32 24 - - -
19B to Cantay Road 24 32 24 - - -
19C to Heartland Town Centre - - - - 16 -

On May 16, 2011, MiWay realigned service along Hurontario to include limited-stop service (Route 202) during Saturdays for passengers wishing to bypass Square One.

In September 6, 2011, Brampton Transit launched its second bus rapid transit line, Route 502 Züm Main, which runs from Sandalwood Parkway to Mississauga City Centre all week long. This route replaced MiWay's 102 Intercity Express. Züm buses run every 10 minutes during rush hours and 20 minutes during off-peak hours and weekends.[16] The frequency of its local counterpart, 2 Main, was reduced to boost ridership in the express service.

At the same date, MiWay replaced 202 Hurontario with a new route, 103 Hurontario Express, which offers additional mid-day and evening services. Its local counterpart, 19 Hurontario, was cut to GO Transit's Highway 407 Park and Ride to fortify the overlapping express services, however its frequency was further increased to address ongoing overcrowding issues between Britannia and Lakeshore Roads, the busiest section of the corridor.[17] 103 Hurontario Express runs every 17.5 minutes during rush hours, 19 minutes during middays and 24 minutes during Saturdays.

On May 5, 2014, MiWay realigned service along Hurontario corridor once again to provide more 10-minute service on daytime along the express route during weekdays, while cutting Routes 19A, 19B, and 19C for the local service south of Trillium Health Centre, leaving only the main branch of Route 19 to serve the entire Mississauga portion of the corridor from Highway 407 to Port Credit.

Stations and connections[edit]

There are 23 proposed stations throughout the corridor, as well as two potential stations. These proposed stations have an average spacing of 850 metres and will feature 90-metre platforms.[9] They are expected to have heated shelters, CCTV cameras, real-time information system and bicycle lockers. Most of them will feature secondary entrances, but since most of the corridor is currently suburban in nature, these secondary entrances create mid-block crossings throughout Hurontario and Main Streets, which enhance pedestrian access.[10]

Station Downtown Mainline Platform Connections Secondary Entrance
Port Street at
Elizabeth Street
X X Centre, West Side Yes, at Stavebank Road
Port Credit GO Station X X Centre Yes, at Park Street
Mineola Road X X Centre, South Side Yes
North Service Road X X Centre, North Side Yes
The Queensway X X Centre, South Side Yes
Dundas Street X X Centre, South Side Yes
Cooksville GO Station X X Centre Yes, at Hillcrest and Kirwin Avenues
Central Parkway X X Centre, North Side Yes
Matthews Gate X X Centre, North Side Yes, at Burnhamthorpe Road
Burnhamthorpe Road
at Main Street
X Centre, West Side Yes, at Kariya Drive
Duke of York Boulevard X Centre Yes, at Prince of Wales and Princess Royal Drives
Rathburn Road at
Station Gate Road
X East Side Yes, at Hammerson Drive
Robert Speck Parkway X Centre, North Side Yes
Eglinton Avenue X X Centre, North Side Yes
Bristol Road X X Centre, North Side Yes
Matheson Boulevard X X Centre, North Side Yes
Britannia Road X X Centre, South Side Yes, at Sandstone Drive
World Drive potential stop
Courtneypark Drive X X Centre, South Side Yes
Skyway Drive/
Superior Boulevard
potential stop
Derry Road X X Centre, North Side Yes, at Kingsway Drive
Highway 407 X X Centre, North Side of Topflight Drive Yes, at Park and Ride access road
Ray Lawson Boulevard X X Centre, North Side Yes
Sir Lou Drive X X Centre, North Side Yes
Steeles Avenue X X Centre, North Side Yes, at Brampton Gateway Terminal's north end

See also[edit]


  1. ^ a b c Kalinowski, Tess (21 April 2015). "Liberals promise $1.6 billion for “transformational” Hurontario LRT". The Toronto Star (Toronto). Retrieved 21 April 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c "Hurontario/Main Street Corridor Master Plan" (PDF). MMM Group. October 2010. p. 578. Retrieved 2011-05-17. 
  3. ^ "Connect10" (PDF). Cities of Mississauga and Brampton. October 2008. p. 2. Retrieved 2011-05-17. 
  4. ^ "Connect10" (PDF). Cities of Mississauga and Brampton. March 2010. p. 2. Retrieved 2011-05-17. 
  5. ^ "Hurontario-Main Light Rail Transit (LRT)" (PDF). Metrolinx. 2012. Retrieved 9 March 2013. 
  6. ^ "Ontario Moving Forward with Hurontario-Main Light Rail Transit Project". Government of Ontario News. 2015. Retrieved 21 April 2015. 
  7. ^ San Grewal (2015-07-03). "The Brampton LRT Debate: Yes or No?". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2015-07-12. 
  8. ^ a b c d Grewal, San (27 October 2015). "Brampton council rejects downtown LRT". The Toronto Star (Toronto). Retrieved 27 October 2015. 
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i
  10. ^ a b c d
  11. ^ "Hurontario/Main Street Rapid Transit Benefits Case" (PDF). Metrolinx. June 2010. p. 51. Retrieved 2011-05-17. 
  12. ^ Criscione, Peter. "Brampton LRT plan gets a no from Hazel". Torstar Network. The Mississauga News. Retrieved 17 May 2013. 
  13. ^ San Grewal, Urban Affairs Reporter (July 21, 2015). "Brampton mayor’s LRT plan woefully short of riders". Toronto Star. Retrieved 2015-07-21. 
  14. ^ "Brampton council votes to reject provincially approved LRT". Metro News. October 28, 2015. Retrieved 2015-10-28. 
  15. ^ "Brampton should not count on LRT funding: Transportation Minister". Metro News. November 3, 2015. Retrieved 2015-11-03. 
  16. ^
  17. ^

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