Joe Andrew

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the British academic, see Joe Andrew (academic).

Joseph J. Andrew (born March 1, 1960) in an American politician and lawyer. He was national chairman of the Democratic National Committee (DNC) from 1999 to 2001. He served with DNC General Chairman Ed Rendell. Asked to serve by President Bill Clinton, Andrew became, at the age of 39, one of the youngest chairpersons in the history of the DNC. He later served as chairman of the New Democratic Network, and in 2006 helped to found The Blue Fund, a mutual fund which invests in companies that contribute to Democratic campaigns.

During the 2008 Democratic Presidential nominating contest he was one of the first to endorse Senator Hillary Clinton in November 2007. However, on May 1, 2008, he switched his endorsement from Clinton to Senator Barack Obama.[1]

Joe Andrew serves as the global chair of the law firm Dentons—a law firm that launched March 28, 2013 with the combination of US/UKMEA firm SNR Denton, Canada's Fraser Milner Casgrain and Europe's Salans, and is now the largest law firm in the world.

On Jan. 26, 2015, Dentons announced that it was combining with a Chinese firm, Dacheng (Chinese: 大成). The new firm will be called Dentons in English and all other languages, other than Chinese, in which it will be called 大成. The logo will feature the Chinese characters globally, with the lettering 大成 Dentons. At launch, Dentons surpassed Baker & McKenzie and DLA Piper, the world’s previous top law firms by headcount, by at least 2,500 lawyers.

In April 2015, Dentons US agreed to a merger with Atlanta-based law firm McKenna Long & Aldridge which was completed in June of that year.

Andrew, a native of Indiana, graduated from Yale University in 1982 and Yale Law School in 1985.[2] He is the author of a spy novel, The Disciples, published in 1993 by Simon & Schuster, and is currently a partner and the global chairman at Dentons in Washington, D.C.


External links[edit]

Party political offices
Preceded by
Steven Grossman
Roy Romer
Democratic National Committee National Chairman
with Ed Rendell
Succeeded by
Terry McAuliffe