New Democrat Coalition

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New Democrat Coalition
ChairSuzan DelBene (WA-01)
Vice Chair for OutreachAmi Bera (CA-07)
Vice Chair for Member ServicesSharice Davids (KS-03)
Vice Chair for CommunicationsAnn McLane Kuster (NH-02)
Vice Chair for PolicyScott Peters (CA-52)
Founded1997; 24 years ago (1997)
IdeologyThird Way[1]
Political positionCenter[2][3][4] to
center-left[5][6]
National affiliationDemocratic Party
International affiliationAlliance of Democrats
(until 2012)
Colors  Blue
Seats in the House Democratic Caucus
94 / 220
Seats in the House
94 / 435
Website
newdemocratcoalition.house.gov

The New Democrat Coalition is a caucus in the House of Representatives of the United States Congress made up of centrist Democrats who support policies that it describes as "pro-economic growth," "pro-innovation," and "fiscally responsible."[7] The caucus has sometimes been considered socially liberal and fiscally conservative.[8][9][10][11]

As of the 117th Congress, the New Democrat Coalition had 95 members (94 Representatives and one non-voting member), making it the third largest ideological caucus in the Democratic Party (behind the Labor Caucus and Congressional Progressive Caucus) and the fourth largest ideological caucus overall (after the Republican Study Committee).

Overview[edit]

The New Democrat Coalition was founded in 1997 by Representatives Cal Dooley (CA), Jim Moran (VA), and Tim Roemer (IN) as a congressional affiliate of the centrist Democratic Leadership Council.[12]

As of 2020, the caucus's issue priorities include addressing climate change, making college more affordable, bipartisanship on deficits and debt, lowering healthcare costs, passing comprehensive immigration reform, modernizing the nation's infrastructure, ensuring access to affordable housing, promoting innovation, and enacting tax reform for the middle class.[13]

In the 117th Congress, the New Democrat Coalition hosted seven task forces: Climate Change, Health Care, Immigration, Infrastructure, Future of Work and Capitalism, Rural Reinvestment, and Trade.[14]

Electoral results[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

Election year No. of overall seats won No. of Democratic seats ±
2000
74 / 435
74 / 212
2002
73 / 435
73 / 205
−1
2004
74 / 435
74 / 202
+1
2006
63 / 435
63 / 233
−11
2008
59 / 435
59 / 257
−4
2010
42 / 435
42 / 193
−17
2012
53 / 435
53 / 201
+11
2014
46 / 435
46 / 188
−7
2016
61 / 435
61 / 194
+15
2018
103 / 435
103 / 233
+42
2020
94 / 435
94 / 222
−9

Chairs[edit]

Leadership[edit]

The current leadership (as per the 117th United States Congress): [15][16]

Membership[edit]

New Democrat Coalition in the 116th United States Congress

In the 117th Congress, 94 Representatives and 1 non-voting delegate of the House of Representatives currently belong to the New Democrat Coalition:[17][18]

Alabama

Arizona

California

Colorado

Connecticut

Delaware

Florida

Georgia

Hawaii

Illinois

Indiana

Iowa

Kansas

Maryland

Massachusetts

Michigan

Minnesota

Nevada

New Hampshire

New Jersey

New York

North Carolina

Oregon

Pennsylvania

Tennessee

Texas

Virginia

Washington

Wisconsin

Non-voting

Former Senate New Democrat Coalition[edit]

The following Senators previously belonged to the defunct Senate New Democrat Coalition, founded in 2000.[19][20][21]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "What Third Way?". Retrieved October 27, 2014.
  2. ^ "Meet the New House Centrists". National Review.
  3. ^ Stanage, Niall (March 2, 2015). "Centrist Dems ready strike against Warren wing". The Hill.
  4. ^ "United House Democrats Return to Squabbling Ways". National Journal. Retrieved October 14, 2018.
  5. ^ Kim, Sueng Min (March 24, 2014). "House Democrats press for immigration vote". Politico. Retrieved July 23, 2014.
  6. ^ https://www.minnpost.com/national/2018/12/will-the-congressional-progressive-caucus-become-the-freedom-caucus-of-the-left/
  7. ^ "About Us". New Democrat Coalition. United States House of Representatives. Retrieved April 1, 2020.
  8. ^ Kenneth S. Baer, ed. (2000). Reinventing Democrats: The Politics of Liberalism from Reagan to Clinton. University Press of Kansas.
  9. ^ Theodore F. Sheckels, ed. (2020). The Rhetoric of the American Political Party Conventions, 1948–2016. Rowman & Littlefield.
  10. ^ "Why the Blue Dogs' decline was inevitable".
  11. ^ Roger H. Davidson, Walter J. Oleszek, ed. (2005). Official Congressional Directory. p. 277. ... New Democrat Coalition, a group of more than 75 centrist House Democrats committed to fiscal responsibility, improvements to education, and maintaining America's economic competitiveness; ...
  12. ^ "New Democrat Coalition: More than One Fourth of the Democratic Caucus".
  13. ^ "Issues". New Democrat Coalition. United States House of Representatives. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  14. ^ "About Us". New Democrat Coalition. United States House of Representatives. Retrieved July 7, 2020.
  15. ^ "Leadership | New Democrat Coalition". newdemocratcoalition.house.gov. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  16. ^ "New Democrat Coalition Announces Complete Leadership Team for 117th Congress | New Democrat Coalition". newdemocratcoalition.house.gov. Retrieved February 11, 2021.
  17. ^ "Leadership | New Democrat Coalition". newdemocratcoalition.house.gov. Retrieved March 29, 2021.
  18. ^ "Members". New Democrat Coalition. United States House of Representatives. Retrieved July 10, 2020.
  19. ^ "Senate New Democrat Coalition Members". Archived from the original on March 13, 2002.
  20. ^ "Senate New Democrat Coalition Members" (July 2001).
  21. ^ "Senate New Democrat Coalition Members" (August 2002).
  22. ^ Harwood, John (July 16, 2001). "Democratic Centrists Declare Cease-Fire with Liberals to Establish United Front". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved October 14, 2018.

External links[edit]