2020 Democratic National Convention

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

2020 Democratic National Convention
2020 presidential election
DNCC-2020-logo.svg
D20 Oval.png Harris Oval.png
Nominees
Biden and Harris
Convention
Date(s)August 17–20, 2020[note 1]
CityMilwaukee, Wisconsin
and various locations remotely
VenueWisconsin Center
and various locations remotely
ChairBennie Thompson
Keynote speaker17 speakers
Notable speakers
Candidates
Presidential nomineeJoe Biden of Delaware
Vice presidential nomineeKamala Harris of California
Voting
Total delegates4,749[1]
Votes needed for nomination2,375 (Absolute Majority)[2]
Results (president)
Results (vice president)Harris (CA): 100% (Acclamation)
Ballots1
‹ 2016  ·  2024 ›
Wisconsin Center was ultimately the main location of the convention.

The 2020 Democratic National Convention was a presidential nominating convention that was held from August 17 to 20, 2020, at the Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and virtually across the United States. At the convention, delegates of the United States Democratic Party formally chose former vice president Joe Biden and Senator Kamala Harris of California as the party's nominees for president and vice president, respectively, in the 2020 United States presidential election.

Originally scheduled to be held July 13–16, 2020, at the Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee, the convention was postponed to August 17–20, 2020, due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic in the United States. The convention was ultimately downsized, with its location shifted to the city's Wisconsin Center and most of the convention presenting remotely from sites across the United States.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the format was substantially different from previous conventions, with the duration of each day of the convention being significantly shorter than in past conventions, and with most of the convention being held remotely from many venues across the country. While being a largely virtual convention, it was officially centered at the Wisconsin Center, which is where its production was headquartered, where its roll call was directed from, and where a limited number of speeches (primarily those by Wisconsin politicians) were staged. Both Biden and Harris made their respective speeches remotely from the Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Delaware. Joe Biden and Kamala Harris went on to win the 2020 election, defeating the Republican party ticket of incumbent President Donald Trump, and vice president Mike Pence.

Background[edit]

The convention was the 49th Democratic National Convention.

Site selection[edit]

The host city of the convention was Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
The Fiserv Forum was originally planned as the venue for the convention.

Bids on the site for the convention were solicited for the convention by the Democratic National Committee (DNC) in late 2017.[3] Preliminary requirements for host cities that the DNC laid out included that they should have between 17,000 and 18,000 hotel rooms (including 1,000 luxury suites) located within 30 minutes of the convention venue.[4]

The Democratic National Committee made the bids public in the spring of 2018.[3] Las Vegas withdrew and decided to focus on the 2020 Republican National Convention, for which its bid was subsequently defeated by Charlotte.[5] In April 2018, the Democratic National Committee sent requests for proposals to the eight remaining cities that had expressed interest in hosting the event (Atlanta, Birmingham, Denver, Houston, Miami, Milwaukee, New York City, and San Francisco).[6]

On June 20, 2018, the Democratic National Committee announced four finalists for the convention site (Denver, Houston, Miami, and Milwaukee). Immediately following the announcement, the finalist city of Denver withdrew from consideration due to apparent scheduling conflicts.[7]

Chairman of the Democratic National Committee Tom Perez announced on March 11, 2019, that Milwaukee would host the convention.[8]

The selection of Milwaukee made this the first Democratic National Convention to be hosted in the Midwestern United States since Chicago hosted the 1996 Democratic National Convention,[9] and the first to be hosted in a midwestern city other than Chicago since St. Louis hosted the 1916 Democratic National Convention.[10] This was the first major party convention held in Milwaukee.[11][12] It was also the first major party convention to be held in any city in the state of Wisconsin.[12][13]

Milwaukee is a smaller than other metropolitan areas that have hosted recent major party conventions.[13] Milwaukee is among the smallest metropolitan areas to have hosted a major party convention.[14] Milwaukee's success in bidding for the convention was viewed in some circles as an upset, as the other two remaining finalist cities were not only larger metropolitan areas, but also had significant experience hosting major events such as Super Bowls.[15]

Milwaukee's selection was seen, in part, as emphasizing party's desire to place an focus on winning Midwestern states like Wisconsin, and its desire to win back "blue wall" states in the upper Midwest and Great Lakes region.[13][16][17] The swing states of Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin had been the states which the Republican ticket of Donald Trump and Mike Pence had won by the narrowest margins in the preceding 2016 election,[18] and had these states been instead won by the 2016 Democratic ticket of Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine, they would have delivered the Democratic ticket an electoral college victory in 2016.[19] The 2016 election had also been the first time since the 1980s that any of these three states had voted Republican.[20] The three aforementioned "blue wall" states were, ultimately, won by the Biden-Harris ticket in 2020.[21][22]

Some sources cited DNC chairman Tom Perez's personal connections to Milwaukee as a factor that aided Milwaukee's selection. His wife had originally been from nearby Wauwatosa, they had held their wedding in Milwaukee, and their daughter was a current student at University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee.[23][24]

Bids[edit]

Several venues in a variety of cities made to efforts to be selected as the location of the 2020 convention.

List of venues vying to host convention, by level reached
Status Venue Notes
Winner Original selection; see § Change of venue below
Finalists With the exception of Milwaukee, each of the finalist cities was a past host of a Democratic convention. Denver hosted in both 1908 and 2008. Houston hosted in 1928. Miami Beach hosted in 1972. In addition, both Houston and Miami Beach have also previously hosted Republican National Conventions, with Houston hosting it once in 1992 and Miami Beach having hosted both the 1968 and 1972 RNCs.
Other bids

Atlanta had previously hosted the 1988 Democratic convention. New York City had previously hosted the 1868, 1924, 1976, 1980, and 1992 Democratic conventions, as well as the 2004 Republican convention. San Francisco had previously hosted both the 1920 and 1984 Democratic conventions (and bordering Daly City had also hosted the 1956 and 1964 Republican conventions).

Change of venue[edit]

On June 24, 2020, it was announced that the convention had been downsized and would be held at Milwaukee's Wisconsin Center instead of its originally planned venue, Milwaukee's Fiserv Forum.[31][32][33] The change of location made this the first major party convention held in a convention center since the 1996 Republican National Convention, and the first Democratic convention to be held in such a venue since the 1984 Democratic National Convention.[citation needed]

Role of superdelegates[edit]

Superdelegates are delegates to the convention who are automatically chosen by the party, rather than by the results of primaries and caucuses. While technically unpledged, in the past many of them have informally pledged themselves to a predesignated front-runner in previous elections. The superdelegate system is controversial among Democrats, and supporters of both Clinton and Sanders have called for their removal in 2020.[34][35]

The Unity Reform Commission, created after the 2016 election, recommended[36] that the number of 2020 superdelegates be drastically reduced. In July 2018, the DNC revoked the voting rights for superdelegates on the first ballot,[37][38] unless a candidate has secured a majority using only pledged delegates.[39]

Except for the presidential nomination, superdelegates will vote on all issues.[40]

Selection of pledged delegates[edit]

The number of delegates allocated to each of the 50 states and Washington, D.C., are based on, among others, the proportion of votes each state gave to the Democratic candidate in the 2008, 2012, and 2016 presidential elections. A fixed number of pledged delegates are allocated to each of the five U.S. territories and Democrats Abroad.[41]

Qualification of suspended campaigns[edit]

The Democratic National Committee's 2020 selection rules state that any candidate who is no longer running loses the statewide delegates they have won and those delegates are then reallocated to candidates still in the race. However, the interpretation of this rule in 2020 races might be different than the interpretation in past races.[42] In previous elections, such as the 2008 presidential primary, candidates would suspend their candidacies rather than formally withdraw, allowing their already pledged delegates to attend the convention and pick up new ones along the way.[43] They would then formally withdraw when it was too late to reallocate the delegations.[citation needed]

Logistics[edit]

Before it was downsized, 50,000 people had been expected to attend the convention.[44] 31 state delegations were to stay in 2,926 Milwaukee-area hotel rooms and 26 delegations were to stay in 2,841 hotel rooms in Lake County and Rosemont, Illinois. Another 11,000 hotel rooms were to house volunteers, members of the media, donors, and other attendees.[45]

Milwaukee had been planning an extension of its streetcar line to be completed in advance of the convention. However, these plans faltered, and the expansion was not completed in time for the convention.[46][47]

Organizers were originally planning to recruit 15,000 volunteers.[48]

The firm Populous was named as the event architect. Populous was assigned to work in partnership with Milwaukee firm American Design Inc.[49][50] In February 2020, Milwaukee-based JCP construction was awarded the contract to be the construction general contractor for the convention.[49] Hargrove LLC was, at the same time, awarded the contract to serve as the convention's event management firm.[49][50]

Host committee[edit]

Host committee logo

The Milwaukee 2020 Host Committee was established to organize the convention.

In October 2019, the Host Committee announced its leadership team.[51] The president of the Host Committee was Liz Gilbert.[51] Leadership included a board of directors.[51] Further leadership included co-chairs and vice chairs, as well as honorary vice-chairs.[51] The co-chairs of the Host Committee were Milwaukee mayor Tom Barrett and Congresswoman Gwen Moore.[51] Vice chairs included Milwaukee County executive Chris Abele, U.S. senator Tammy Baldwin, Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin Mandela Barnes, Governor of Wisconsin Tony Evers, former U.S. senator Herb Kohl.[51] Honorary vice chairs included Milwaukee Common Council president Ashanti Hamilton and Wisconsin state treasurer Sarah Godlewski, Democratic leader for the Wisconsin State Assembly Gordon Hintz, Attorney General of Wisconsin Josh Kaul, Congressman Ron Kind, Wisconsin secretary of state Doug La Follette, Congressman Mark Pocan, and Wisconsin State Senate minority leader Jennifer Shilling.[51] Additionally, the Host Committee's honorary finance chair was Alex Lasry, the senior vice president of the Milwaukee Bucks.[51]

In early February 2020, Milwaukee 2020 Host Committee president Liz Gilbert and her chief-of-staff Adam Lonso were both fired after an investigation found that the committee's "work environment did not meet the ideals and expectations" of the organization's board (with allegations of a "toxic" work environment).[52] Acting as interim leader of the Host Committee was Teresa Vilmain.[53] In late February, new leadership team was announced with Raquel Filmanowicz serving as CEO and Paula Penebaker serving as COO, with both taking these positions formally on March 2, 2020.[53]

The host committee raised $40 million to stage the convention.[54]

Delay[edit]

The convention was originally scheduled to be held July 13–16, 2020,[55]

On April 2, 2020, it was announced that, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the convention would be delayed to August 17–20.[56]

Downsizing[edit]

As early as April 2020, the Democratic Party had been bracing for the possibility of a virtual convention.[57] On May 12, 2020, the Democratic National Committee authorized the convention planners to research alternative methods for participants to cast votes, considering the possibility that the Democratic National Committee may decide to hold the entire convention virtually.[58]

On June 24, 2020, it was announced that the convention was to be downsized. The venue was shifted from the Fiserv Forum to the Wisconsin Center. But, instead of the entire convention being held in Milwaukee, it would now feature Milwaukee as merely a hub city for the major convention events. The convention was now planned to instead consist of what the DNC said would be "curated content from Milwaukee and other satellite cities, locations, and landmarks across the country".[59][32][60] All official business will now be conducted remotely. Organizers canceled official parties and events scheduled to be held in Milwaukee before and coinciding with the convention.[32] Delegates were asked to no longer travel to Milwaukee, and plans were now formally made to implement a system for them cast their votes virtually.[61]

In mid-July, members of Congress were told not to travel to attend the event in Milwaukee.[62]

At the announcement of the downsizing it was declared that Biden would accept his nomination in Milwaukee.[59] It was later announced on July 30, 2020, that his running mate would also accept her nomination in Milwaukee.[63] However, on August 5, 2020, it was announced that Biden no longer planned to travel to Milwaukee to accept his nomination, and would instead do so from Delaware.[64][65] It was also announced then that the other scheduled speakers, including Biden's running mate, will also be addressing the convention remotely.[64][66] This is seen as, effectively, moving to make the convention almost entirely virtual.[66] This was the first time that a major party presidential candidate has accepted their nomination remotely since Franklin D. Roosevelt did so in 1944.[67]

The convention was first shrunk to feature only 5,000 attendees in its Milwaukee hub venue.[44] It was later further shrunk to feature only 1,000 attendees there.[44] It was further shrunk to include just 300 people, including both attendees and media granted access.[68] Due to an order by the Milwaukee Health Department barring gatherings over 250 people, the total number of people permitted to gather at the Milwaukee convention hub was capped at that number.[57][69][70] There were be no delegates in the Wisconsin Center.[71]

While speakers were not traveling to Milwaukee, it was still planned for Chairman of the Democratic National Committee Tom Perez and Secretary of the Democratic National Committee Jason Rae (also secretary of the convention) to be in Milwaukee.[72][73]

The Wisconsin Center was used for the convention's broadcast and production.[74] It acted as the control room and "hub" of the convention production.[75] The convention saw a mix of pre-recorded segments and live broadcasts from sites across the United States.[67] The convention organizers designated a custom video control room designed to handle hundreds of feeds from across the country, in order to accommodate the remote speeches.[64][76] The control room was located in the exhibit hall on the third floor of the Wisconsin Center.[77][78]

A stage had been set up in a conference room on the second floor of the Wisconsin Center.[77][78] The stage at the Wisconsin Center saw limited use, with a number participants from Wisconsin using it as the venue for their participation in the convention.[77][79] Speakers from Wisconsin delivered their speeches from the stage at the Wisconsin Center.[79] Convention secretary Jason Rae also directed the roll call from the Wisconsin Center stage.[79]

In addition to the physical aspects of the convention being downsized, the duration was also significantly downsized. The convention's program was downsized from one that was originally expected to total 24 hours over the four days, to one that would total only eight hours.[54]

The downsizing led the convention organizers to need far fewer volunteers than the 15,000 they had originally been trying to recruit.[80]

The owner of the Milwaukee Bucks and the Fiserv Forum threatened to sue the Democratic Party, which had paid only $5.5 million of the $7 million rent on the abandoned venue.[81]

Health protocols[edit]

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, a number of protocols have been put in place.

Participants at Wisconsin Center were required to self-quarantine for at least 72 hours before arriving, wear personal protective equipment, undergo daily COVID-19 testing, partake in symptom tracking through a daily questionnaire, avoid bars and restaurants, and follow Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines.[82]

Security[edit]

As is routine for a major party convention, the event had been designated a National Special Security Event.[83] Originally, the United States Department of Justice was to provide $50 million in security, but this was decreased to $40 million.[84]

The boundaries of the planned security footprint, in which increased security measures would be implemented, but in which individuals not attending the convention (including demonstrators) were still to be permitted, was announced in January 2020. The streets marking the boundary of the announced footprint were to be Cherry Street on the north, 10th Street on the west, Clybourn Street, and Water Street on the east.[85][86] On July 24, 2020, the Milwaukee Common Council passed an ordinance that would ban a long list of items from the security footprint, including air rifles, nunchucks, drones, containers of bodily fluids, glass bottles, and coolers.[87] On August 12, 2020, it was announced that the security footprint had been shrunk significantly.[88] The security footprint ultimately encompassed almost only areas directly surrounding the convention center.[88][89][90]

Fencing was erected surrounding the Wisconsin Center.[86][91]

Originally, the city originally budgeted to have approximately 3,000 law enforcement officers from outside the city assist the Milwaukee Police Department during the convention.[84] This was decreased to approximately 2,000.[84] By late July there were anticipated to be only 1,100 officers from outside the city assisting the department.[92] However, in late July, more than 100 police agencies announced that they would be withdrawing from their contracts to provide personnel to aid in security during the convention after the Milwaukee police chief announced that their department would restrict the use of tear gas and pepper spray by law enforcement during demonstrations and protests.[93] The Wisconsin National Guard then planned to provide hundreds of members to help with security.[94]

There had been talk of potentially limiting boat traffic on the Milwaukee River by placing a temporary stay on all bridge openings, but this security measure did not materialize.[88][95]

Temporary flight restrictions were to be in place each night from 6:00 to 11:00 p.m. CDT.[88] A ban on drones would also be in place.[88]

Programming[edit]

While the primary purpose of political conventions is, and always was, to decide who the nominees for president and vice president are to be, the secondary purpose was always that of socializing.[96] Entertainment is also a major element of the event, which in the past has included a house band for the main venue, theater, culinary experiences,[97][98] and hundreds of motivational speakers. Indeed, the convention experience for attendees at the venue itself is extremely different from that for the viewer at home. With live coverage of the event limited, outside of the three major news networks and C-SPAN, to the keynote and acceptance speeches, the challenge to the DNC is how to boost ratings while increasing the nominee's lead in opinion polls. With social distancing still paramount to ensure the safety of the tens of thousands of people who were due to attend the main venue in Milwaukee, will not be able to do so, alternative methods are planned for a series of satellite venues across the country.[59]

The official theme of the convention will be "Uniting America".[99]

The downsizing and coronavirus concerns also mean the convention will not see the festive balloon drop often seen at such conventions following the presidential candidate's acceptance speech.[100] First appearing at the 1932 Republican National Convention, a balloon drop would later reappear at the 1956 Republican National Convention, and would become a staple of most major party conventions held since.[101] However, not all Democratic conventions have featured balloon drops. Most recently, both the 2008 and 2012 Democratic National Conventions did not see balloon drops, due to the fact that the final night of the 2008 edition was held outdoors in a stadium, and due to the fact that the final night of the 2012 edition had originally been scheduled to be held outdoors before being moved indoors. Other Democratic conventions that went without balloon drops included the 1984 and 1988 editions.[101]

Satellite locations[edit]

Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Delaware, was a satellite location.

When party officials concluded that the pandemic would make a traditional convention impossible, they decided to adopt a format that was dramatically different from past conventions. The event has been officially dubbed a "Convention Across America".[59][99]

While the convention will be anchored in Milwaukee, the events will be held in a dozen or so satellite sites spread out across the nation. From there, the delegations will transmit their votes on the floor of the Wisconsin Center, where a representative will announce the votes to relevant officials at the chair in the main venue.[102]

It was announced that none of the speakers would have in-person crowds at their speaking locations.[103]

There were key satellite locations located at studios in Los Angeles, New York City, and at the Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Delaware.[104][105] The emcees hosting each night were presenting from the satellite site in Los Angeles.[104]

Platform[edit]

In April, shortly after Sanders endorsed Biden, the two created a "Unity task force" to draft a version of the party platform.[106] The Democratic National Convention Committee set up a series of "virtual platform meetings" to garner input from the general public.[107]

The Platform Drafting Committee Chair is Atlanta mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms. The Platform Standing Committee includes a number of party leaders and elected officials appointed by the DNC:[108]

Drafting process[edit]

Public hearings were live-streamed on the DNCC's YouTube channel on the following topics:[109]

  • Monday, June 29 from 5-8 p.m. ET: "Addressing the COVID-19 Health Crisis and Building Back Better."[109] A "Medicare for All" provision was rejected by the committee on June 27 on a 125–36 vote.[110]
  • Wednesday, July 1 from 5-8 p.m. ET: "A Vision for a More Equitable Future"[109]
  • Thursday, July 2 from 5-8 p.m. ET: "Restoring the Soul of America"[109]

The full Platform Drafting Committee met on July 15 and 27,[111] where they submitted a finished product[112][113] to be voted on via the internet from August 1–15.

Platform provisions and ratification[edit]

After months of negotiations, Biden/Sanders platform task force issued its 110-page report on July 9 outlining platform recommendations.[114] Convention delegates officially adopted the Democratic Party's 2020 platform on August 18,[115] following delegate balloting by mail.[110] The platform was divided into ten sections: "pandemic response, the economy, health care, criminal justice, climate, immigration, education, foreign policy, voting rights, and identity-related rights issues."[116] The platform calls for:

The platform was the most progressive in Democratic Party history,[115] and the most progressive for any major political party in U.S. history.[116] However, there was some dissent from the party's left wing over the omission of platform planks supporting single-payer healthcare ("Medicare for All") or the Green New Deal.[115] Prior to the convention, over 700 delegates, largely from Bernie Sanders' camp, previously signed a statement vowing to vote against the platform because it did not include a provision supporting Medicare for All;[117] this included U.S. representatives Rashida Tlaib and Ro Khanna.[115][118][119][116] Although the platform was adopted, a final vote count was not released.[115]

Convention leadership[edit]

On March 26, 2019, Joe Solmonese, former president of the Human Rights Campaign, was named convention CEO.[120]

On June 1, 2020, the campaign of presumptive nominee Joe Biden named two advisers to the convention, naming Addisu Demissie as adviser for convention coordination and Lindsay Holst as senior adviser for convention and special projects.[121]

Programming was overseen by Ricky Kirshner.[59][122] In addition, Stephanie Cutter held the formal position of Program Executive.[99] Jessica Jennings was the director of media logistics.[123]

Officers[edit]

On July 30, 2020, the officers of the convention were designated.[73][124] Representative Bennie Thompson served as the permanent chair of the convention.[73][125]

Permanent co-chairs were Milwaukee mayor Tom Barrett, Rep. Tony Cárdenas of California, Senator Tom Carper of Delaware, Senator Tammy Duckworth of Illinois, Mayor of Atlanta Keisha Lance Bottoms, and New Jersey governor Phil Murphy.[73][124] The convention's vice-chairs were Senator Bob Casey Jr. of Pennsylvania, former representative Tony Coelho of California, Representative Sharice Davids of Kansas, Lieutenant Governor of Michigan Garlin Gilchrist, Congresswoman Donna Shalala of Florida, former Representative Carol Shea-Porter of New Hampshire, Lieutenant Governor of Wisconsin Mandela Barnes, and Lieutenant Governor of Nevada Kate Marshall.[73][124] Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer served as honorary chairs.[73][124]

The convention's sergeant-at-arms was Representative Gwen Moore of Wisconsin.[124][126] Jason Rae acted as secretary of the convention.[73] The convention's parliamentarians were House majority leader Steny Hoyer, Helen McFadden, Sarah E. Merkle, and state senator Yvanna Cancela of Nevada.[73]

Nominating and balloting[edit]

Pre-convention delegate count[edit]

The table below reflects the presumed delegate count as per the 2020 Democratic primaries.

As of July 2020, the following overall number of pledged delegates is subject to change, as possible penalty/bonus delegates (awarded for each state scheduled election date and potential regional clustering) may be altered.[127]

The 2020 Democratic Party rules state that, unless a candidate has secured a majority of delegates using only pledged delegates, the superdelegates will have no voting rights on the first ballot.[37][38][39]

Candidates who have suspended their campaigns without having received any pledged or superdelegate endorsements, as well as those who've suspended their campaigns and subsequently lost their endorsements to other candidates, are not included in the table below.

The table below reflects the presumed pledged delegate count following the 2020 Democratic primaries. In addition to these, there will also be 771 superdelegate votes (including the eight half-votes belonging to Democrats Abroad superdelegates), making for 4,750 combined delegate votes.[127][128]

Pledged delegates by candidate
Candidate Pledged delegates[129]
Joe Biden February 2020 crop.jpg
Joe Biden
2,716
Bernie Sanders in March 2020 (cropped).jpg
Bernie Sanders
1,112
Elizabeth Warren by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Elizabeth Warren
63
Michael Bloomberg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Michael Bloomberg
59
Pete Buttigieg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Pete Buttigieg
21
Amy Klobuchar by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg
Amy Klobuchar
7
Tulsi Gabbard (48011616441) (cropped).jpg
Tulsi Gabbard
2
Total pledged delegate votes 3,979[128]

Presidential balloting[edit]

Results of the delegate roll call by state/territory
  Joe Biden
  Bernie Sanders

In an email, DNC secretary Jason Rae wrote to delegates outlining the process for that year's convention, noting that the planning committee "concluded that state delegations should not plan to travel to Milwaukee and official convention business will be conducted remotely."

Delegates vote remotely using a system the planning committee crafted that allows them to cast their ballots via email, with unique identifiers for security. The DNC had plans to certify each delegate.

The party said delegates would be able to fill out the forms electronically, with no need for a printer or physical copy, according to the letter. The ballot, which includes questions about platform planks and the party's nominees, will be emailed to their state's committee. Once a state party had all the ballots from their delegation, the state delegation's chair would "submit a tally sheet to the Secretary's Office that formally records the number of votes cast on each item of convention business," The votes would be counted all at once on August 15, not as they come in.

Voting began August 3 and ended August 15, when the state delegation chairs were asked to submit their final tallies to the DNC secretary. That meant that the party knew the tally of votes for its nominee before the convention formally began.[130][131]

Presidential roll call vote[edit]

The traditional roll call of the states was held on the second night of the convention. It was done remotely from each of the 57 delegations, including all 50 states and seven additional territories/jurisdictions (the District of Columbia, the five inhabited U.S. territories, and Democrats Abroad).[132] Organizers planned for it to last approximately 30 minutes.[133] Convention secretary Jason Rae directed the roll call from the Wisconsin Center.[79]

The remote roll call was widely praised.[134][135][136][137]

Announcing their states' delegates' nominations were:

Vice presidential nomination[edit]

The Rules Committee report which was passed by the convention addressed, among other things, the fiascos that occurred during the 1972 and 1980 conventions as regards selection of the vice-presidential nominee.

Rule C.7. of the Rules of Procedure states:[150]

7. Nomination for the Democratic Candidate for Vice President: The Democratic candidate(s) for Vice President shall be nominated by the Presidential candidate who has obtained a number of pledged delegates equal to a majority of all pledged and automatic delegates to the Convention. If there is only one nominee for Vice President, the Chair is authorized to declare the nominated individual the Democratic Candidate for Vice President.

In accordance with this provision, Biden submitted Harris' name to the chairman, Bennie Thompson, and after Thompson's public reading of the rule, she was declared nominated.

Schedule[edit]

Each night of the convention was planned to last two hours. In addition to the convention's overall official theme of "Uniting America", each night had an official sub-theme of its own.[99]

Monday, August 17[edit]

Democratic National Convention
Pool Feeds
Night 1
video icon from MSNBC via YouTube[151]
video icon from C-SPAN via YouTube[152]
video icon from PBS NewsHour via YouTube[153]
video icon from Politico via YouTube[154]
Democratic National Convention
Democratic Party Streams
Night 1
video icon Official convention stream via YouTube[155]
video icon Official ASL convention stream via YouTube[156]
video icon Official spanish-language convention stream via YouTube[157]

9:00–11:00 p.m. EDT[158]

Emcee: Eva Longoria[159]

Theme
"We the People"[99]
Sub-themes
  • "We the People Demanding Racial Justice"[160]
  • "We the People Helping Each Other Through COVID-19"[160]
  • "We the People Putting Country Over Party"[160]
  • "We the People Recovering"[160]
  • "We the People Rise"[160]
Evening schedule
Select speakers (in order of appearance)
Speakers for 1st evening (Monday) of 2020 convention
Speaker Position/notability Location Notes Cite
Eva Longoria Cannes 2015 (1).jpg Eva Longoria Actress and activist Los Angeles, California Emcee [155][160][159]
Bennie Thompson official photo (2).jpg Bennie Thompson United States representative from Mississippi and permanent chairman of the convention Jackson, Mississippi Call to Order and Close of Order [155][160]
Gwen Moore, official portrait, 116th Congress (1).jpg Gwen Moore United States representative from Wisconsin Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin [79][155][160]
Muriel Bowser official photo (2).jpg Muriel Bowser Mayor of the District of Columbia Black Lives Matter Plaza in Washington, D.C. [155][160]
Jim Clyburn official portrait 116th Congress (1).jpg Jim Clyburn United States representative from South Carolina and House majority whip Charleston, South Carolina [155][160]
Andrew Cuomo 2017 (1).jpg Andrew Cuomo Governor of New York Albany, New York [155][161][160]
Kristin Urquiza San Francisco, California [155][160]
Sara Gideon Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives and U.S. Senate nominee from Maine Scarborough, Maine Introduction to performance by Maggie Rogers [155][160][162]
Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (cropped).jpg Gretchen Whitmer Governor of Michigan UAW Local 603 in Lansing, Michigan [155][160]
The Honorable Christine Todd Whitman (10192776606) (1).jpg Christine Todd Whitman Former administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and governor of New Jersey (Republican) New York, New York
[citation needed]
[155][160]
Meg Whitman crop (1).jpg Meg Whitman Former CEO of Hewlett-Packard and Republican nominee for Governor of California in 2010 Sacramento, California
[citation needed]
[155][160]
Susan Molinari 1998 (1).jpg Susan Molinari Former United States representative from New York (Republican) Sarasota, Florida
[citation needed]
[155][160]
Governor John Kasich (1).jpg John Kasich Former governor of Ohio (Republican); candidate for the 2000 and 2016 Republican presidential nominations Westerville, Ohio [155][160][163]
Senator Doug Jones official photo (cropped 2).jpg Doug Jones United States senator from Alabama Birmingham, Alabama [155][160][164]
Catherine Cortez Masto official portrait (cropped).jpg Catherine Cortez Masto United States senator from Nevada; Chair of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee Las Vegas, Nevada [155][160][161]
Amy Klobuchar, official portrait, 113th Congress (cropped closein3x4).jpg Amy Klobuchar United States senator from Minnesota; candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination Saint Paul, Minnesota [155][160][165]
Cedric Richmond official photo (3).jpg Cedric Richmond United States representative from Louisiana New Orleans, Louisiana [155][160]
Bernie Sanders in March 2020 (cropped).jpg Bernie Sanders United States senator from Vermont; candidate for the 2016 and 2020 Democratic presidential nomination Burlington, Vermont [54][155][160]
Michelle Obama by Gage Skidmore (2).jpg Michelle Obama Former first lady of the United States Personal residence in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts [155][160][166]
Performances (in order of appearance)
Selected film segments

Tuesday, August 18[edit]

Democratic National Convention
Pool Feeds
Night 2
video icon from C-SPAN via YouTube[167]
video icon from MSNBC via YouTube[168]
video icon from PBS NewsHour via YouTube[169]
video icon from Politico via YouTube[170]
Democratic National Convention
Democratic Party Streams
Night 2
video icon Official convention stream via YouTube[139]
video icon Official ASL convention stream via YouTube[171]
video icon Official spanish-language convention stream via YouTube[172]

The second night of the convention included official business, such as the nominating roll call for president.

9:00–11:00 p.m. EDT[158]

Emcee: Tracee Ellis Ross[159]

Theme
"Leadership Matters"[99]
Evening schedule
Select speakers (in order of appearance)
Speakers for 2nd evening (Tuesday) of 2020 convention
Speaker Position/notability Location Notes Cite
Tom Barrett for Wisconsin (1).jpg Tom Barrett Mayor of Milwaukee Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin Call to order [79][139][173]
The keynote address featured seventeen of the Democratic Party's "rising stars" from across the country. The speakers were former minority leader of the Georgia House of Representatives Stacey Abrams; Tennessee state senator Raumesh Akbari; United States representative Colin Allred of Texas; United States representative Brendan Boyle of Pennsylvania; Nevada state senator Yvanna Cancela; former Ohio state representative Kathleen Clyde; Florida commissioner of agriculture Nikki Fried; Mayor of Long Beach, California Robert Garcia; Pennsylvania state representative Malcolm Kenyatta; South Carolina state senator Marlon Kimpson; United States representative Conor Lamb of Pennsylvania, Michigan state representative Mari Manoogian; Texas state representative Victoria Neave; president of the Navajo Nation Jonathan Nez; Georgia state representative Sam Park; New Hampshire state representative Dennis Ruprecht; mayor of Birmingham, Alabama, Randall Woodfin Keynote address [139][173][174]
TraceeEllisRossbyErikMelvin (1).jpg Tracee Ellis Ross Actress Los Angeles, California Emcee [139][173]
Sally Q. Yates (1).jpg Sally Yates Former acting United States attorney general Atlanta, Georgia [139][173]
Chuck Schumer official photo (1).jpg Chuck Schumer United States Senate minority leader Brooklyn, New York [139][173]
Caroline Kennedy US State Dept photo (1).jpg Caroline Kennedy Former ambassador to Japan and the daughter of former president John F. Kennedy Joint remarks [139][173]
Jack Schlossberg (1).jpg Jack Schlossberg Grandson of John F. Kennedy [139][173]
DIG13605-028 (1).jpg Jimmy Carter Former president of the United States Joint remarks (voice only, no video appearance) [173]
Rosalynn Carter (48885949882).jpg Rosalynn Carter Former first lady of the United States [139][173]
Bill Clinton at the Clinton Foundation in New York (40806662552).jpg Bill Clinton Former president of the United States Chappaqua, New York [139][167][173]
Official portrait of United States Secretary of Labor Tom Perez (1).jpg Tom Perez Chairman of the Democratic National Committee Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin [139][167][173]
Bob King - World Economic Forum Annual Meeting 2012 (1).jpg Bob King Former president of the United Auto Workers Ann Arbor, Michigan Nominating speech for Bernie Sanders [139][167][173]
Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez Official Portrait (1).jpg Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez United States representative from New York Washington, D.C. Seconding speech for Bernie Sanders [139][167][173]
Jacquelyn Asbie Security guard New York City Nominating speech for Joe Biden [175][176][177]
Chris Coons, official portrait, 112th Congress (1).jpg Chris Coons United States senator from Delaware Wilmington, Delaware Seconding speech for Joe Biden [139][167][173]
Lisa Blunt Rochester official photo (1).jpg Lisa Blunt Rochester United States representative from Delaware Wilmington, Delaware Seconding speech for Joe Biden [139][167][173]
Ady Barkan - 49640332768 (2).jpg Ady Barkan Activist [139][173]
Kevin Johnson (1).jpg Kevin Johnson Former mayor of Sacramento Los Angeles, California [139][173][178]
Former United States Secretary of State, John Kerry (29826211427) (1).jpg John Kerry Former secretary of state and the party's 2004 presidential nominee Boston, Massachusetts [139][173][179]
Colin Powell (15570753996) (1).jpg Colin Powell Former United States secretary of state (Republican) Washington, D.C. [139][180]
Jill Biden official portrait 2 (1).jpg Jill Biden Spouse of the presidential nominee and former second lady of the United States Brandywine High School in Wilmington, Delaware [139][173][181]
Select film segments
Performances

Wednesday, August 19[edit]

Democratic National Convention
Pool Feeds
Night 3
video icon from C-SPAN via YouTube[185]
Democratic National Convention
Democratic Party Streams
Night 3
video icon Official convention stream via YouTube[186]
video icon Official ASL convention stream via YouTube[187]
video icon Official spanish-language convention stream via YouTube[188]

9:00–11:00 p.m. EDT[158]

Emcee: Kerry Washington[159]

Theme
"A More Perfect Union"[99]
Sub-themes
  • A More Perfect Society[189]
  • A More Perfect Economy[189]
Evening schedule
  • Introduction[186]
  • Call to Order by convention chair Bennie Thompson
  • Pledge of Allegiance[186]
  • Main convention program[186]
  • Vice-presidential nomination[73][190]
  • Vice-presidential acceptance speech[186]
Select speakers (in order of appearance)
Speakers for 3rd evening (Wednesday) of 2020 convention
Speaker Position/notability Location Notes Cite
Tony Evers (cropped).jpg Tony Evers Governor of Wisconsin Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin [79][186][189]
Kamala Harris official photo (2).jpg Kamala Harris Democratic nominee for
vice president of the United States, United States senator from California
Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Delaware Welcoming remarks [186][105]
Kerry Washington, Deliver Commencement Address GWU (8755052944) (1).jpg Kerry Washington Actress Los Angeles, California Emcee [159][186][189]
Gabrielle Giffords by Gage Skidmore 4 (1).jpg Gabrielle Giffords Former United States representative from Arizona and a prominent gun control advocate [186][189]
Michelle Lujan Grisham official photo (1).jpg Michelle Lujan Grisham Governor of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico [186][189]
Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2 (1).jpg Hillary Clinton Former United States secretary of state and the party's 2016 presidential nominee Chappaqua, New York [186][189]
Official photo of Speaker Nancy Pelosi in 2019 (1).jpg Nancy Pelosi Speaker of the United States House of Representatives San Francisco, California [186][189]
Mariska Hargitay @ Make Believe On Broadway (cropped) (1).jpg Mariska Hargitay Actress and philanthropist New York City, New York [186][189]
Hilda Solis Secrétaire au travail (cropped 3x4).jpg Hilda Solis Member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors and former United States secretary of labor Los Angeles, California [186][189]
Elizabeth Warren, official portrait, 114th Congress (2).jpg Elizabeth Warren United States senator from Massachusetts; candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination Springfield, Massachusetts [186][189]
Barack Obama in October 2016 (1).jpg Barack Obama Former president of the United States Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania [186][189][191]
Maya Harris at Kamala Harris inauguration as Attorney General (1).jpg Maya Harris Younger sister of the
vice presidential nominee
Nominating speech for Kamala Harris [186][189]
Meena Harris Niece of the
vice presidential nominee
Ella Emhoff in 2017 (1).jpg Ella Emhoff Stepdaughter of the
vice presidential nominee
Kamala Harris official photo (2).jpg Kamala Harris Democratic nominee for
vice president of the United States, United States senator from California
Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Delaware Vice-presidential nomination acceptance speech [189][105]
Select film segments
Performances

Thursday, August 20[edit]

Democratic National Convention
Pool Feeds
Night 4
video icon from C-SPAN via YouTube[192]
Democratic National Convention
Democratic Party Streams
Night 4
video icon Official convention stream via YouTube[193]
video icon Official ASL convention stream via YouTube[194]
video icon Official spanish-language convention stream via YouTube[195]

9:00–11:00 p.m. EDT[158]

Emcee: Julia Louis-Dreyfus[159]

Theme
"America's Promise"[99]
Evening schedule
Select speakers (in order of appearance)
Speakers for 4th evening (Thursday) of 2020 convention
Speaker Position/notability Location Notes Cite
Official portrait of United States Secretary of Labor Tom Perez (1).jpg Tom Perez Chairman of the Democratic National Committee Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin [139]
Gavin Newsom official photo (a).jpg Gavin Newsom Governor of California Santa Cruz County, California[197] [193][198]
Andrew Yang by Gage Skidmore.jpg Andrew Yang Entrepreneur; Founder of Venture for America; candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination New York City, New York [193][196]
Julia Louis-Dreyfus 2019 (2).jpg Julia Louis-Dreyfus Actress Los Angeles, California Emcee [193][159][196]
Chris Coons, official portrait, 112th Congress (1).jpg Chris Coons United States senator from Delaware Wilmington, Delaware [139][196]
Atlanta City Hall (46792855394) (cropped).jpg Keisha Lance Bottoms Mayor of Atlanta Atlanta, Georgia [139][196]
Jon meacham 2014 (1).jpg Jon Meacham Author Nashville, Tennessee [139][196]
Deb Haaland official portrait, 116th congress 2 (1).jpg Deb Haaland United States representative from New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico [139][196]
Sarah Cooper (2).png Sarah Cooper Author and comedian [139]
Alex Padilla official photo (1).jpg Alex Padilla California secretary of state Joint remarks [139][196]
Jocelyn Michelle Benson (1).jpg Jocelyn Benson Michigan secretary of state
Cory Booker, official portrait, 114th Congress (1).jpg Cory Booker United States senator from New Jersey; candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination New York City, New York [139][196]
Vice Admiral Vivek H. Murthy, USPHS (1).jpg Vivek Murthy Former Surgeon General of the United States Miami, Florida [139][196]
Tammy Baldwin, official portrait, 113th Congress (1).jpg Tammy Baldwin United States senator from Wisconsin Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, Wisconsin [79][139][196]
Tammy Duckworth, official portrait, 115th Congress (2).jpg Tammy Duckworth United States senator from Illinois Washington, D.C. [139][196]
Pete Buttigieg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg Pete Buttigieg Former mayor of South Bend, Indiana; candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination South Bend, Indiana [139][196]
Michael Bloomberg by Gage Skidmore (cropped).jpg Michael Bloomberg Former mayor of New York City; candidate for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination Colorado [139][196][199]
Brayden Harrington [139]
Ashley Biden 130121-Z-QU230-318 (1).jpg Ashley Biden Daughter of the presidential nominee [139][196]
R. Hunter Biden at Center for Strategic & International Studies (1).jpg Hunter Biden Son of the presidential nominee
Joe Biden 2013.jpg Joe Biden Nominee for president of the United States, former vice president of the United States Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington, Delaware Presidential nomination acceptance speech [105][196]
Select film segments
Select performances

Speakers and other events[edit]

In the past, hundreds of people had addressed each convention, giving many local or statewide candidates a valuable photo op, a notable difference from this convention. Some of the speeches at this convention were pre-recorded.[200]

The convention included performances by Leon Bridges, the Chicks, Common, Billie Eilish, Jennifer Hudson, John Legend, Billy Porter, Maggie Rogers, Prince Royce, Stephen Stills, and others.[201]

A number of speakers at the convention included individuals who are everyday Americans, rather than officeholders or celebrities.[133][202] A number of these speakers were dissatisfied Republicans, including individuals who had voted for Trump in 2016, but plan on voting for Biden in 2020.[133][203]

Daytime events[edit]

Caucus meetings and other events were streamed on various platforms earlier on the days of the convention.[158] Virtual policy roundtables were hosted in partnership with Business Forward.[204] Many partner organization events were planned to be held, including a Protect Our Care health care panel with Nancy Pelosi, Xavier Becerra, Kathleen Sebelius, and three of the five health care activists featured in a conversation with Joe Biden on Night 2 of the convention.[205]

Before the convention opened, an Interfaith Welcome Service was held virtually on August 16, a partner event to the DNC.[206]

Official pre-show programs[edit]

Before the official convention broadcast started, each night there was an official pre-show.[158]

The first night featured a single pre-show program, the live special Behind The Rhyme presents Your Voice Your Vote.[158] It was to be streamed exclusively on Twitch.[158]

The second night featured a single pre-show program, the live special Behind The Rhyme presents Your Voice Your Vote.[158] It was to be streamed exclusively on Twitch.[158]

The third-night featured two pre-show programs.[158] The first, running from 7:30 p.m. to 8:15 p.m. EDT, was scheduled to be the Democratic Governors Association-hosted panel "Bold Leadership: Women Governors Leading". The panel featured Oregon governor Kate Brown, Kansas governor Laura Kelly, New Mexico governor Michelle Lujan Grisham, Maine governor Janet Mills and Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer, and was be moderated by Rhode Island governor Gina Raimondo.[158] The second program, beginning at 8:00 p.m. EDT, was be the live special Behind The Rhyme presents Your Voice Your Vote. It was streamed exclusively on Twitch.[158]

The fourth night was to feature three pre-show programs. The first, running from 7 to 8 p.m. EDT was to be the Democratic Governors Association-hosted panel entitled "#DemGovsGetItDone: Progress in Red & Purple States". This panel featured Louisiana governor John Bel Edwards, Minnesota governor Tim Walz, Kentucky governor Andy Beshear, Wisconsin governor Tony Evers, and Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer, and would be moderated by Stacey Abrams.[158] Two official pre-show events were to be hosted beginning at 8 p.m. EDT. The first was planned to be the live special Behind The Rhyme presents Your Voice Your Vote, streamed exclusively on Twitch.[158] The second was to be the live special "Crooked Media presents Pod Save America Live from the Democratic National Couch-vention!", featuring Pod Save America hosts Jon Favreau, Jon Lovett, Tommy Vietor, and Daniel Pfeiffer.[158] The Pod Save America program was planned to include the world premiere of the documentary short "Dress Rehearsal".[158]

Official post-show programs[edit]

There was an official post-show edition of Behind The Rhyme presents Your Voice Your Vote each night of the convention streamed exclusively on Twitch. Each of these included panels followed by a set by a DJ. The first night's DJ was Beverly Bond, the second night's was Vashtie, the third night's was DJ Cassidy, and the fourth night's was Jermaine Dupri.[158]

Notable speeches[edit]

Jill Biden[edit]

Jill Biden official portrait 2 (1).jpg
How do you make a broken family whole? The same way you make a nation whole. With love and understanding – and with small acts of kindness. With bravery. With unwavering faith.

Jill Biden at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[207]

Jill Biden, the spouse of presidential nominee Joe Biden and the former second lady of the United States, delivered her speech on the second night of the convention from the classroom at Brandywine High School in Wilmington, Delaware, where she had been an English teacher from 1991 through 1993.

Biden's speech was focused on both family and education. She discussed how the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic had impacted education, as well as families and the economy. She touted her husband as a candidate capable of tackling the pandemic.

Biden also recounted the personal tragedies that her husband had endured, including the deaths of his first wife, Neilia, and first-born daughter, Naomi, in a 1972 automobile accident, and the 2015 death of his son Beau from brain cancer.[208]

Joe Biden[edit]

Joe Biden (48548455397) (rotated).jpg
Here and now I give you my word. If you entrust me with the presidency, I will draw on the best of us, not the worst. I will be an ally of the light, not the darkness. It's time for us, for we, the people, to come together. And make no mistake. United we can and will overcome this season of darkness in America.

Joe Biden at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[209]

Joe Biden, the 2020 Democratic nominee for president, delivered a speech on the fourth night of the convention from Wilmington, Delaware. A common motif emphasized throughout was the conflict between light, referring to himself, and darkness, referring to Donald Trump.[210]

Biden began his speech by quoting Ella Baker.[209] Biden pledged to be a president for all Americans, regardless of whether or not they voted for him.[209]

Biden referenced the killing of George Floyd in his speech.[209]

While drawing a contrast between himself and Trump, Biden's speech did not include any utterances of his main opponent's name.[211]

Michael Bloomberg[edit]

Michael Bloomberg January 2019 (1).jpg
The two people running for president couldn't be more different. One believes in facts. One does not. One listens to experts. The other thinks he knows everything. One looks forward and sees strength in America's diversity. The other looks backwards and sees immigrants as enemies and white supremacists as allies. Here's another difference. One has proven he knows how to handle a crisis by helping to lead the economic turnaround after the 2008 recession, while the other has not only failed to lead, he has made the current crisis much worse.

Michael Bloomberg at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[212]

Former mayor of New York City and candidate for the 2020 Democratic nomination Michael Bloomberg delivered his speech on the final night of the convention from Colorado.[199]

Bloomberg laid contrast between incumbent Republican president Donald Trump and Biden.[212]

Bloomberg declared, "I'm not asking you to vote against Donald Trump because he's a bad guy. I'm urging you to vote against him because he's done a bad job."[212]

Bloomberg likened the prospect reelecting Trump to rehiring or working for, "someone who ran your business into the ground, and who always does what's best for him or her, even when it hurts the company, and whose reckless decisions put you in danger".[212]

Pete Buttigieg[edit]

Pete Buttigieg (49405495202) (1).jpg
I trust Joe Biden and Kamala Harris to guide this nation toward that better future, because I have seen their commitment, and their empathy, up close. And I trust the capacity of America to grow more inclusive, because I have lived it.

Pete Buttigieg at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[213]

Former mayor of South Bend, Indiana and candidate for the 2020 Democratic nomination Pete Buttigieg delivered his speech on the final night of the convention from LangLab South Bend, Indiana, where he and his husband, Chasten, had held their wedding reception years earlier.[214]

Buttigieg, himself openly homosexual, highlighted the progress that the United States had made on LGBT rights during his lifetime, pointing to his marriage (enabled by the 2015 Obergefell v. Hodges Supreme Court decision) and the viability of his candidacy as an openly gay candidate for the presidency as two examples of such progress.[213][214] He also mentioned how, earlier in his life, when he served in the military, the "Don't ask, don't tell" policy (since repealed in 2011 under the Obama administration) had barred him from being open about his sexuality while in service.[213]

Bill Clinton[edit]

Bill Clinton at the Clinton Foundation in New York (40806662552).jpg
Our party is united in offering you a very different choice: a go-to-work president. A down-to-earth, get-the-job-done guy. A man with a mission: to take responsibility, not shift the blame; concentrate, not distract; unite, not divide. Our choice is Joe Biden.

Bill Clinton at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[215]

Former president of the United States Bill Clinton delivered his speech on the second night of the convention from Chappaqua, New York.[139]

Clinton began his speech by declaring that he believed United States presidential elections to be, "the world's most important job interview".[215]

Clinton lambasted President Donald Trump's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.[215]

Clinton praised Biden's work in the Obama administration on repairing the United States economy from the Great Recession.[215] He praised Biden's plans to rebuild the United States economy from the downturn it experienced amid the COVID-19 pandemic.[215]

He argued that Biden should be elected and that Trump should be denied a second term, declaring, "You know what Donald Trump will do with four more years: blame, bully, and belittle. And you know what Joe Biden will do: build back better."[215]

Hillary Clinton[edit]

Hillary Clinton by Gage Skidmore 2 (1).jpg
For four years, people have said to me, 'I didn't realize how dangerous (Trump) was,' 'I wish I could go back and do it over,' 'I should have voted.' This can't be another woulda-coulda-shoulda election. If you're voting by mail, request your ballot now, and send it back as soon as you can. If you vote in person, do it early. Bring a friend and wear a mask. Become a poll worker...Remember, Joe and Kamala can win 3 million more votes and still lose. Take it from me. We need numbers so overwhelming Trump can't sneak or steal his way to victory.

Hillary Clinton at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[216]

Former United States secretary of state and 2016 Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton delivered her speech on the third night of the convention from Chappaqua, New York.[186]

Clinton praised Biden and Harris as, "leaders equal to this moment".[216] She praised Biden's "thoughtfulness and empathy".[216] She praised Harris as a, "daughter of an extraordinary mother," as well as, "relentless in the pursuit of justice, and uncommonly kind."[216]

Clinton, herself a former First Lady of the United States, expressed joy towards Jill Biden's intentions to continue her work as an educator if she becomes First Lady.[216]

Clinton urged voters not to repeat the result of the 2016 election in which Trump had defeated her in the United States Electoral College, thus winning the presidency.[216]

Clinton criticized Trump's presidency, saying, "Remember in 2016 when Trump asked 'What do you have to lose?' Well, now we know. Our health, our jobs, even our lives. Our leadership in the world and, yes, our post office."[216]

Clinton stated that she believes that it is morally wrong that the richest Americans saw their wealth increase during the pandemic while tens of millions of other Americans lost.[216]

Clinton declared, reiterating an African proverb she had helped popularize in the United States, that "it still takes a village". Her speech invoked DREAMers, and reiterated support for Black Lives Matter, while invoking the deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery.[216]

Clinton invoked the struggle for voting rights in the United States. She mentioned that the previous day had marked the centennial of the ratification of the Nineteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which granted nationwide women's suffrage.[216] She also invoked John Lewis' participation in the Selma to Montgomery marches fighting against racial injustice including the disenfranchisement of black voters.[216]

Andrew Cuomo[edit]

Andrew Cuomo by Pat Arnow cropped (1).jpeg
Americans' eyes have been opened, and we have seen in this crisis the truth: that government matters and leadership matters.

Andrew Cuomo at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[217]

Governor of New York Andrew Cuomo delivered his speech on the opening night of the convention from Albany, New York.[161]

While referencing a number of issues that plagued the nation, Cuomo's speech primarily focused on criticizing President Donald Trump's response to the COVID-19 pandemic.[217][218]

Cuomo also declared that, "Only a strong body can fight off the virus, and America's divisions weakened it."[217]

Brayden Harrington[edit]

Kids like me are counting on you to elect someone we can all look up to, someone who cares, someone who will make our country and the world feel better. We're counting on you to elect Joe Biden.

— Brayden Harrington at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[219]

Brayden Harrington spoke on the convention's closing night.[139][219] Harrington, a 13-year-old New Hampshire boy who stutters, spoke about how, on the campaign trail during the primaries, Joe Biden had related to him about his struggles overcoming a stutter of his own, and had shared advice for how to persevere through such an impediment.[139][219]

Harrington's speech attracted significant attention, being seen as one of the highlights of the convention's final night.[219]

Kamala Harris[edit]

Kamala Harris official photo (2).jpg
Joe and I believe that we can build that beloved community, one that is strong and decent, just and kind. One in which we all can see ourselves...I pledge to you that we will act boldly and deal with our challenges honestly. We will speak truths. And we will act with the same faith in you that we ask you to place in us.

Kamala Harris at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[220]

In her vice-presidential nomination acceptance speech on the third night of the convention, Kamala Harris declared that she and Biden will, if elected, tackle issues facing the United States, including racial injustices.[220] Harris provided an autobiographical summary of her life and career.[220]

John Kasich[edit]

Governor John Kasich (1).jpg
Joe Biden is a man for our times, times that call for all of us to take off our partisan hats and put our nation first.

John Kasich at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[221]

Republican former governor of Ohio and 2000 and 2016 Republican presidential candidate John Kasich delivered remarks on the opening night of the convention in a pre-recorded video filmed at a road junction near his personal residence in Westerville, Ohio.[222]

Kasich began his speech by declaring that, "America is at a crossroads."[221] While calling himself a, "lifelong Republican", he declared that this came second to his sense of responsibility to the United States, which had compelled him to appear at the convention.[221]

Building on the opening metaphor of America being at a crossroads, as well as the visual metaphor of the speech's physical location at the divergence of two paths, in his closing, Kasich declared that, "When America chooses the right path and pulls together, like we've done so many times before, we can dream big dreams and we can see the top of the mountain as a United States of America, with a soul that is a beacon of freedom to the entire world"[221]

John Kerry[edit]

Former United States Secretary of State, John Kerry (29826211427) (1).jpg
Donald Trump pretends Russia didn't attack our elections. And now, he does nothing about Russia putting a bounty on our troops. So, he won't defend our country, he doesn't know how to defend our troops. The only person he's interested in defending is himself.

John Kerry at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[179][207]

On the opening night of the convention, former United States secretary of state and 2004 Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry delivered a speech in Boston, Massachusetts, which heavily criticized Donald Trump's approach foreign policy, characterizing it as a nonstop "blooper reel".[179][223]

Kerry criticized Trump for denying the existence of Russian interference in the 2016 United States elections, and for what Kerry charged was Trump's failure to protect United States troops from the alleged Russian bounty program.[224]

Barack Obama[edit]

President Barack Obama (1).jpg
Any chance of success depends entirely on the outcome of this election. This administration has shown it will tear our democracy down if that's what it takes to win. So we have to get busy building it up -- by pouring all our effort into these 76 days, and by voting like never before -- for Joe and Kamala, and candidates up and down the ticket, so that we leave no doubt about what this country we love stands for -- today and for all our days to come.

Barack Obama at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[225]

Former United States president Barack Obama delivered his speech on the third night of the convention from the Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.[191]

During his speech, Obama broke with the customary practice of not criticizing his presidential successor by name.[226]

In his remarks, Obama declared, "Donald Trump hasn't grown into the job because he can't. And the consequences of that failure are severe. 170,000 Americans dead. Millions of jobs gone while those at the top take in more than ever. Our worst impulses unleashed, our proud reputation around the world badly diminished, and our democratic institutions threatened like never before."[225]

Michelle Obama[edit]

Michelle Obama by Gage Skidmore (2).jpg
Whenever we look to this White House for some leadership or consolation or any semblance of steadiness, what we get instead is chaos, division, and a total and utter lack of empathy...Let me be as honest and clear as I possibly can. Donald Trump is the wrong president for our country. He has had more than enough time to prove that he can do the job, but he is clearly in over his head. He cannot meet this moment. He simply cannot be who we need him to be for us. It is what it is.

Michelle Obama at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[227]

Former first lady of the United States Michelle Obama delivered her speech on the opening night of the convention from her personal residence in Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts.[166]

Obama reaffirmed her conviction in the motto she expressed during her 2016 convention speech, "when they go low, we go high".[227][228]

Obama declared her belief that, "being president doesn't change who you are; it reveals who you are."[227]

Obama touted what she felt were some the successes of her husband's presidency and Joe Biden's vice presidency, including the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, respect for the United States from the international community, and steps made internationally to address climate change.[227] She contrasted these with what she felt were some of the failures of the Trump presidency. She characterized the United States under Trump's leadership as, "underperforming not simply on matters of policy, but on matters of character."[227] One failure she charged Trump with was the United States' death toll and domestic economic damage of the COVID-19 pandemic, for which she faulted Trump's downplaying of the severity of the virus.[227] Another aspect of the Trump presidency she criticized was its reneging on international agreements and its betrayal of alliances that had been championed by past presidents, including Republicans Ronald Reagan and Dwight D. Eisenhower.[227] She also criticized what she regarded to be Trump's emboldening of "torch-bearing white supremacists" seen at the Unite the Right rally.[227] Obama further criticized Trump's derision of the political catchphrase and movement Black Lives Matter.[227]

After declaring Trump an unfit president, Obama remarked, "it is what it is", echoing words that Trump had recently used about the COVID-19 death toll.[228]

Obama directly invoked the deaths of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, both of whom had been killed by law enforcement earlier in 2020, and whose deaths had become central flash points of ongoing protests and unrest that are considered part of the Black Lives Matter movement.[227]

Obama touted the virtues of Biden's character, declaring him a "profoundly decent man," that, "knows what it takes to rescue an economy, beat back a pandemic, and lead our country."[227][228] She recounted the personal tragedies that he had endured, including the deaths of his first wife, Neilia, and first-born daughter, Naomi, in a 1972 automobile accident, and the 2015 death of his son Beau from brain cancer, declaring that Biden's "life is a testament to getting back up, and he is going to channel that same grit and passion to pick us all up, to help us heal and guide us forward".[227]

Obama warned of potential voter suppression in the 2020 election, and urged citizens to collectively cast their votes for Biden, "in numbers that cannot be ignored".[228]

In the penultimate sentences of her speech, she quoted John Lewis as saying, "When you see something that is not right, you must say something. You must do something."[227]

Nancy Pelosi[edit]

Official photo of Speaker Nancy Pelosi in 2019 (1).jpg
We will elect President Biden, whose heart is full of love for America, and rid the country of Trump's heartless disregard for America's goodness...Our mission and our pledge is to fight for a future equal to the ideals of our founders, our hopes for our children, and the sacrifices of our veterans, our brave men and women in uniform and their families.

Nancy Pelosi at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[229]

Speaker of the United States House of Representatives Nancy Pelosi delivered her speech on the third night of the convention from San Francisco, California.[186]

Pelosi began her speech by expressing her pride in the diversity of the Democratic majority she leads in the United States House of Representatives.[229]

In her remarks Pelosi painted President Donald Trump and Republican United States Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell as dual obstacles to progress.[230]

Pelosi praised Biden as, "battle-tested, forward-looking, honest and authentic" and Harris as, "committed to our Constitution, brilliant in defending it".[229]

Colin Powell[edit]

Colin Powell (15570753996) (1).jpg
Our country needs a commander in chief who takes care of our troops in the same way he would his own family...Joe Biden will be a president we will all be proud to salute. With Joe Biden in the White House, you will never doubt that he will stand with our friends and stand up to our adversaries...On day one he will restore America's leadership and our moral authority.

Colin Powell at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[231]

Republican former United States secretary of state Colin Powell delivered his speech on the second night of the convention from Washington, D.C..[180]

Powell opened his speech by briefly recounting the stories of how each of his parents immigrated to the United States from Jamaica.[231]

Powell extolled Biden for having morally strong defining values.[231]

Powell praised the sort of leadership he argued that Biden would bring to the United States as president.[231] He argued Biden would, "restore America's leadership in the world and restore the alliances we need to address the dangers that threaten our nation, from climate change to nuclear proliferation."[231]

He described the United States as "a country divided", and argued that President Trump is, "doing everything in his power to keep up that way", arguing that Biden would be a unifier as president.[231]

Bernie Sanders[edit]

Bernie Sanders in March 2020 (cropped).jpg
We have a president who is not only incapable of addressing these crises but is leading us down the path of authoritarianism...This election is the most important in the modern history of this country. In response to the unprecedented crises we face, we need an unprecedented response—a movement, like never before, of people who are prepared to stand up and fight for democracy and decency—and against greed, oligarchy, and bigotry. And we need Joe Biden as our next president.

Bernie Sanders at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[232]

United States senator from Vermont and candidate for the 2016 and 2020 Democratic nominations Bernie Sanders spoke from Burlington, Vermont, on the opening night of the convention.[54][233]

In his speech, Sanders urged his supporters to lend their support to Biden in order to oust Donald Trump.[232][233] He conceded that, while he and Biden disagree on the specifics their plans to expand healthcare coverage and lower prescription drug costs, Biden still has a plan that greatly accomplish this.[232][233] He also touted other issues for which Biden has plans.[232]

Chuck Schumer[edit]

Chuck Schumer official photo (1).jpg
America, Donald Trump has quit on you. We need a president with dignity, integrity, and the experience to lead us out of this crisis, a man with a steady hand and a big heart who will never—ever—quit on America: that man is my friend Joe Biden. He will be a great president.

Chuck Schumer at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[234]

United States Senate minority leader Chuck Schumer delivered his speech on the second night of the convention from the New York City, New York, borough of Brooklyn, with the Statue of Liberty in the background.[139][234]

Schumer invoked the memory of immigrants, such as his grandparents, who were greeted by the Statue of Liberty upon their arrival in the United States.[234]

Schumer argued that America will benefit from both electing the ticket of Biden and Harris, as well as from flipping control of the United States Senate from Republican to Democratic.[234]

Kristin Urquiza[edit]

"My dad was a healthy 65-year-old. His only pre-existing condition was trusting Donald Trump, and for that, he paid with his life...The coronavirus has made it clear that there are two Americas; the America that Donald Trump lives in and the America that my father died in. Enough is enough. Donald Trump may not have caused the coronavirus, but his dishonesty and his irresponsible actions made it so much worse"

— Kristin Urquiza at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[235]

On the opening night of the convention, Kristin Urquiza, who had lost her father Mark Urquiza to COVID-19, gave a speech, in which she said that her father, who believed Donald Trump and other Republicans that Urquiza blamed for downplaying the severity of the COVID-19 pandemic, had disregarded his safety and went to a karaoke bar with friends, where he possibly contracted the disease he succumbed to.[235][236][237]

Urquiza criticized Trump for "dishonesty" and "irresponsible actions", which she faulted with worsening the pandemic.[235][236]

Urquiza also said that one of the last things her father, who she said voted for Trump in 2016, had told her before dying was that he "felt betrayed by the likes of Donald Trump", and that she therefore planned to cast her 2020 vote for Joe Biden in honor of her father.[235][237]

Urquiza's speech was regarded by pundits to be one of the highlights of the convention's opening night.[238]

Elizabeth Warren[edit]

Elizabeth Warren (49375607546) (2).jpg
We build infrastructure like roads, bridges and communications systems so that people can work...It's time to recognize that childcare is part of the basic infrastructure of this nation—it's infrastructure for families. Joe and Kamala will make high-quality child care affordable for every family, make preschool universal, and raise the wages for every child care worker.

Elizabeth Warren at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[239]

United States senator from Massachusetts and candidate for the 2020 Democratic nomination Elizabeth Warren delivered her speech on the third night of the convention from a classroom located in a Springfield, Massachusetts, early learning center that was temporarily closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[240] Warren's speech centered on the importance of passing legislation to provide universal child care.[241]

Gretchen Whitmer[edit]

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer (cropped).jpg
It's crucial that we rally together to fight this virus and build our economy back better...With Joe Biden and Kamala Harris in the White House, we will.

Gretchen Whitmer at the 2020 Democratic National Convention[242]

Governor of Michigan Gretchen Whitmer delivered her speech on the opening night of the convention from UAW Local 603 in Lansing, Michigan.[155]

Whitmer began by praising Barack Obama and Joe Biden's actions to rescue the auto industry amid its 2008–10 crisis.[242] Whitmer then transitioned into discussing both the Michigan and national responses to the COVID-19 pandemic.[242] She argued that Biden and Harris would provide the leadership needed to address the pandemic.[242]

Keynote address (various speakers)[edit]

Demonstrations and protests[edit]

August 20 protest organized by the Coalition to March on the DNC

There were some demonstrations and protests held outside of the convention venue in Milwaukee.[91][247]

Several groups scheduled protests in Milwaukee during the convention.[71][87] Ryan Hamann, co-chair of the "Coalition to March on the DNC" stated that his coalition's planned protests would focus on police reform, in effect being a continuance of the nationwide George Floyd protests.[248]

On August 2, the City of Milwaukee reported that very little interest had been indicated by parties in seeking permits to either organize a downtown parade or a speech in a downtown park.[249]

Club Kids Inc. was scheduled to hold a permitted parade in Milwaukee at noon CDT on August 17.[249] The Women's Human Rights Campaign was scheduled to hold a permitted parade in Milwaukee on August 20 at 10 A.M. CDT.[249]

DNC Delegates United for Peace protest

One day before the opening of the convention, the "DNC Delegates United for Peace" protest saw protesters, including convention delegates, protest in Milwaukee against war and military spending.[250]

Other groups protesting in Milwaukee included Democrats for Life of America.[71]

The Trump campaign held counter-events in Wisconsin during the convention.[251] The campaign officially held a "Women for Trump" campaign event in Pleasant Prairie the day before the start of the convention.[252] Additionally, the White House held multiple events in Wisconsin, which included one event in Oshkosh, Wisconsin, on the opening day of the convention, and another in Milwaukee itself the third day of the convention, with the first event featuring President Donald Trump and the latter event featuring Vice President Mike Pence.[251][253][254] The presence of a Trump event caused the Coalition to March on the DNC to alter their plans for Monday and protest outside of the Trump event rather than outside of the convention itself.[255]

There were protests outside of the Chase Center on the Riverfront in Wilmington, with over 100 pro-Trump demonstrators assembling a few hours prior to Biden's acceptance speech and electronic message trucks driving around the site criticizing Biden's alleged sexual assault of a former aide. The trucks were paid for Turning Point Action.[256]

Broadcast and media coverage[edit]

The convention was slimmed down from previous iterations in terms of the length of television programming it provided, with only two hours of televised events taking place on each night of the convention.[257] Domestic 24-hour cable news channels broadcast both hours, but Fox News and the big three domestic television networks (ABC, CBS, and NBC) only broadcast the last hour.[258][259] In contrast, for past conventions, domestic 24-hour cable news channels broadcast wall-to-wall coverage of day-long proceedings.[260] However, the length of prime time coverage provided by the "Big Three" domestic television networks was also one hour per night during the Democratic and Republican conventions of 2016.[260][259]

PBS aired three hours of nightly coverage, including commentary.[261] A number of domestic cable news channels and internet news platforms and streaming video news channels are also airing significant coverage of the convention in addition to the two hours of the convention itself.[261]

In addition to the main convention broadcast, other media coverage opportunities were made available to the press by the convention organizers and the Biden campaign, including remote press briefings and interviews.[64]

Broadcasters pooled their resources and shrunk their footprints at the convention.[68] The convention organizers worked with both the network pool and the congressional press galleries to establish pooled media opportunities.[64] There was more of a reliance by broadcasters on footage from press pool cameras than at past conventions.[100] Broadcasters relied on the same shared camera feed of the convention's stage.[68][262] As with past conventions, the convention organizers made a feed of convention proceedings available for free to media organizations.[64][76]

Due to the pandemic, and the resultant decentralization of the convention, there was only expected to be a small press pool in Milwaukee, with as few as a hundred media personnel being anticipated to travel to Milwaukee.[254][261] This was drastically less than the more than 15,000 that traveled to Philadelphia for the 2016 Democratic National Convention.[261] Unlike past conventions, most broadcasters did not send correspondents to the convention site, and instead filmed their reporters at remote sites.[68][257][259][261] Limited press were be admitted into the Wisconsin Center headquarters of the convention.[77] Those reporters that did go to the convention were socially distanced, and, at least at times, reported from outside of the convention hall.[68] Most broadcasters had their correspondents provide coverage from network studios in New York City and Washington, D.C.[257][259][261] In addition to filming their correspondents off-site, most broadcasters also used their primary control rooms in their headquarter cities, as opposed to the practice of establishing temporary control rooms in the convention city as many had for past conventions.[100] Few national broadcasters sent crews to Milwaukee.[261]

After the downsizing, but even before it was announced that Biden and other speakers would no longer travel to Milwaukee, many broadcasters had already substantially scaled back plans to send reporters to the city, or had planned to forgo sending reporters to the city altogether.[68][257] By July 29, Fox News was the only broadcaster confirmed to be sending correspondents to the convention hall itself.[257] As of early July, MSNBC had still planned a "light footprint" in the city Milwaukee, but planned to position the reporters they do send outdoors, where they can socially distance from each other, instead of inside the convention venue.[262] CNN also, as of early August, still planned to send reporters to Milwaukee.[263] As of early August, CBS News was planning to send two correspondents to Milwaukee.[263] In addition, after the downsizing, but even before it was that Biden and other speakers would no longer be traveling to Milwaukee, broadcasters had already planned to significantly decrease the size of crews they would send to capture the convention in comparison to previous years.[100] CNN had already canceled its original plans to operate a "CNN Grill" studio and meeting space, similar to those it had operated at every major party convention since 2004. They had originally planned to use Turner Hall for such a space.[264] Fox News, on the other hand, before the announcement that Biden and other speakers would not be traveling to the convention, still planned to retain their plans to utilize the Deer Camp building in Milwaukee as a broadcast space,[262] and CBS News still planned to rent the Milwaukee Community Sailing Center for broadcast use.[263] NBCUniversal cancelled similar plans to use the Good City Brewing location adjacent to the Fiserv Forum.[265]

Due to the fact that Biden and Harris spoke from Wilmington, Delaware, some media personnel covered the convention from there, with a number of broadcast vans and media tents being stationed in the parking lots of the Chase Center on the Riverfront (where Biden and Harris spoke) and adjacent Frawley Stadium.[181][266]

The originally-planned full-scale convention in Fiserv Forum would have seen broadcasters set up live sets inside the arena, similar to those in this image of the 2016 Democratic National Convention.

The originally-planned full-scale convention in the Fiserv Foum would have seen broadcasters set up live sets inside the arena, as has been practice at past conventions.[262] Before the announcement that speakers would no longer be traveling to Milwaukee, convention organizers had been setting up some form of indoor and outdoor news media spaces at the Milwaukee convention hub.[72][263]

The Wisconsin Center was used for the convention's broadcast and production, acting as the control room and "hub" of the convention production.[74][75] The convention organizers established a custom video control room there designed to handle hundreds of feeds from across the country, in order to accommodate the remote speeches.[64][76]

Official streams and watch parties[edit]

In addition to coverage by broadcasters, there is a stream broadcast by the DNC itself on fifteen platforms. These platforms are the convention's website, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Twitch, Amazon Prime Video, Microsoft Bing, Apple TV, Roku TV, Amazon Fire TV, AT&T U-verse, DirectTV, Comcast Xfinity X1, Comcast Xfinity Flex, and Amazon Alexa.[64][76][258][267]

In addition, the Biden campaign scheduled numerous virtual watch parties during the convention which showed a stream of the convention, with a number of them being hosted by prominent politicians and celebrities.[268][269] Some outdoor socially-distanced watch parties were hosted by Democratic Party organizations, such as one for Connecticut convention delegates to attend at Dunkin' Donuts Park in Hartford.[270] There were additionally drive-in watch parties held by Democratic Party organizers, including one right outside the Chase Center on the Riverfront on the night Biden accepted his nomination there.[54][271][272][273][274]

Evening television viewership[edit]

According to Nielsen, the Democratic National Convention averaged 21.6 million views across all traditional cable and television networks across all four nights.[275] This is composed of 19.7 million viewers on night 1, 19.2 million viewers on night 2, 22.8 million viewers on night 3, 24.6 million viewers on night 4.[citation needed]

These numbers do not include viewers on livestream.

Night 1[edit]

Night one of the Democratic convention had 19.7 million viewers across all cable and television networks tracked by Nielsen. The first night of the Republican convention had 17.0 million viewers across the same networks.[276]

Night one of the Democratic convention had 18.8 million viewers across six major, traditional television (NBC, CBS, ABC) and cable networks (FNC, CNN, MSNBC) tracked by Nielsen. The first night of the Republican convention had 15.9 million viewers across the same six networks.[276]

The viewership for the first night of the convention was down by 25% compared to the equivalent night in 2016.[277]

Compared to 2016, the only network that saw a rise in viewership for Night 1 was MSNBC.[citation needed]

Night 2[edit]

Night two of the Democratic convention had 19.2 million viewers across all television networks tracked by Nielsen. The second night of the Republican convention had 19.4 million viewers across the same networks.[279]

Night two of the Democratic convention had 18.5 million viewers across six major, traditional television and cable networks tracked by Nielsen. The second night of the Republican convention had 18 million viewers across the same six networks. These numbers do not include viewers on streaming services.[280]

Compared to 2016, the only network that saw a rise in viewership for Night 2 was MSNBC.[citation needed]

Night 3[edit]

Night three of the Democratic convention had 22.8 million viewers across all television networks tracked by Nielsen. The third night of the Republican convention had 17.3 million viewers across the same networks.[281]

Night three of the Democratic convention had 21.5 million viewers across six major, traditional television and cable networks tracked by Nielsen.[282]

Compared to 2016, the only network that saw a rise in viewership for Night 3 was MSNBC.[citation needed]

Night 4[edit]

Night four of the Democratic convention had 24.6 million viewers across all television networks tracked by Nielsen.[283]

Compared to 2016, the only network that saw a rise in viewership for Night 4 was MSNBC.[citation needed]

Compared to Night 3 of 2020, the only networks that saw a rise in viewership for Night 4 were Fox News Channel and ABC.

Impact[edit]

The convention was regarded to have been largely successful.[284][285]

Lack of a convention bounce[edit]

The first polls conducted after the Democratic National Convention showed no convention bounce for Biden.[284][286] Later polling, conducted after the Republican National Convention concluded the following week, indicated that there had been virtually no convention bounce for either party coming out of August conventions held in back-to-back weeks.[287][288][289]

Ahead of, and during, the conventions, various outlets had speculated that significant convention bounces were unlikely for either party.[290][291][286][292] This was due to several cited factors. One was that it had been observed that convention bounces had been more minuscule in recent elections. Per some calculations, convention bounces had averaged just 2 points since 2004, compared to just under 7 points between 1968 and 2000.[290] Per other calculations, average bounces since 1996 averaged 3.6 points, while bounces between 1962 and 1992 averaged 6.3 points.[286] Another factor cited for why it was seen as unlikely for either party to generate a significant convention bounce in 2020 was that polls in the 2020 race had, in the months prior to the convention, shown a remarkably steady race, with Biden consistently holding an approximately 6-point er exceeding an average lead of 10 points and never slipping below a lead of 4 points. It has been shown that more stable races tend to see smaller convention bounces.[290][292] Another was that the conventions, having been scaled-back due to the COVID-19 pandemic, were seen as less likely to generate as much attention as past conventions had, particularly due to the decrease in television viewership .[290][291] Another was that the electorate was already strongly opinionated on the candidates, with more voters holding a strong opinion on Trump than any incumbent since at least 1980, and more voters holding a strong opinion on Biden than any challenger to an incumbent since at least 1980.[290] Races where voters hold strong opinions on the candidates tend to see smaller convention bounces.[290] Strong partisanship among the electorate was another cited factor.[292]

The Democrats were also seen as having factors which the Republican convention did not that might hamper its chances at a convention bump. One was the fact that the Republicans would hold their convention immediately following them.[284] Additionally, the fact that Biden already had a large lead among independents heading into the convention, possibly made Biden particularly unlikely to experience a convention bounce, as some speculated that Biden may have already been near his likely ceiling of support.[286][293]

While his electoral poll numbers may not have received a bounce, some polling showed Biden to have received a boost in favorability ratings.[294][295]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Declared abstention
  2. ^ 35 delegates did not vote[citation needed]
  1. ^ Originally scheduled to be held July 13–16, but rescheduled due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  2. ^ Includes all delegates not voting, whether announced as abstentions or not.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "2020 Democratic Hard Count and Floor Vote Delegate Summary". thegreenpapers.com. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  2. ^ "How to Win the Democratic Nomination, and Why It Could Get Complicated". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 22, 2020. Retrieved February 22, 2020.
  3. ^ a b "2020 Democratic National Convention: Milwaukee 8.17–20.2020". www.eriecountydems.org. Erie County Democrats. November 8, 2019. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  4. ^ "Birmingham vying again for Democratic convention". al.com. AL.com. April 20, 2018. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  5. ^ a b Verhovek, John (July 20, 2018). "Charlotte to host the 2020 Republican National Convention". ABC News. Archived from the original on July 22, 2018. Retrieved July 21, 2018.
  6. ^ a b c Seitz-Wald, Alex (May 9, 2018). "Eager Dems 2020 prep: DNC eyes convention cities, debates, rule changes". NBC News. Archived from the original on May 9, 2018. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  7. ^ a b c d e "City of Milwaukee 1 of 3 finalists to host 2020 Democratic National Convention". FOX6Now.com. June 20, 2018. Archived from the original on July 1, 2018. Retrieved July 1, 2018.
  8. ^ Barrow, Bill; Bauer, Scott; Moreno, Ivan (March 12, 2019). "Democrats: Milwaukee convention choice shows party values". Associated Press. Archived from the original on March 11, 2019. Retrieved March 12, 2019.
  9. ^ Korecki, Natasha; Thompson, Alex (March 11, 2019). "Milwaukee to host Democrats' 2020 convention". Politico. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 11, 2020.
  10. ^ Lipaz, Jessica (February 24, 2019). "2020 Democratic National Convention has eyes on Milwaukee". The Daily Cardinal. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  11. ^ Wise, David (August 7, 2020). "With 2020 DNC dramatically downsized, push begins for Milwaukee to host again in 2024 | WisPolitics.com". wispolitics.com. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  12. ^ a b Silver, Maayan (March 12, 2019). "What Landing The 2020 Democratic National Convention Means For Milwaukee". www.wuwm.com. Archived from the original on August 7, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  13. ^ a b c Sommerhauser, Mark (March 12, 2019). "All eyes on Milwaukee: The 2020 Democratic National Convention is coming to Wisconsin". madison.com. Wisconsin State Journal. Archived from the original on August 9, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  14. ^ "Milwaukee to host 2020 Democratic National Convention". CBS58. WDJT-TV. Associated Press. March 11, 2020. Archived from the original on March 30, 2019. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  15. ^ Barrow, Bill; Moreno, Ivan; Bauer, Scott (March 11, 2019). "Dems pick Milwaukee for 2020 convention over Miami, Houston". valleynewslive.com. Valley News Live. Associated Press. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  16. ^ "Milwaukee chosen as 2020 Democratic National Convention site". ABC News. March 11, 2019. Archived from the original on July 29, 2020. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  17. ^ "Milwaukee chosen to host 2020 Democratic National Convention". TMJ4. WTMJ-TV. Associated Press. March 11, 2019. Archived from the original on July 10, 2019. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  18. ^ Catanes, David (November 14, 2016). "The 10 Closest States in the 2016 Election". US News. Archived from the original on July 26, 2020. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  19. ^ Bumpclose, Philip (December 1, 2016). "Donald Trump will be president thanks to 80,000 people in three states". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 9, 2020. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  20. ^ Meko, Tim; Lu, Denise; Gamino, Lazzaro (November 11, 2016). "How Trump won the presidency with razor-thin margins in swing states". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 19, 2020. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  21. ^ Gilbert, Craig.; Spangler, Todd; Prose, J. D. (November 10, 2020). "Joe Biden flipped the 'blue wall' states of Michigan, Wisconsin and Pennsylvania, but work still needs to be done". USA TODAY. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  22. ^ Beaumont, Thomas (November 8, 2020). "How Biden shored up Democrats' fragile 'blue wall' in Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania". The Detroit News. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  23. ^ Glauber, Bill; Spicuzza, Mary (March 12, 2019). "Milwaukee wins tight race to host the 2020 Democratic National Convention". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  24. ^ Thomas, Ken (March 11, 2019). "Democrats Choose Milwaukee for 2020 National Convention". Retrieved January 12, 2021.
  25. ^ Glauber, Bill (August 22, 2018). "Selection committee for 2020 Democratic Convention will visit Milwaukee next week". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 23, 2018. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  26. ^ Ketterer, Samantha (August 16, 2018). "Houstonians rally around 2020 Democratic National Convention bid". Houston Chronicle. Archived from the original on August 24, 2018. Retrieved August 24, 2018.
  27. ^ Gurney, Kyra; Flechas, Joey; Herrera, Chabeli (June 27, 2018). "Cruise ship hotels, zoo parties and an NBA arena: Miami's Democratic convention pitch". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on July 1, 2018. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  28. ^ Sands, Darren (March 23, 2018). "Atlanta Will Bid To Host The 2020 Democratic National Convention". Buzzfeed News. Archived from the original on March 24, 2018. Retrieved March 24, 2018.
  29. ^ Poe, Kelly (August 1, 2016). "Mayor Bell: Birmingham will seek the DNC again in 2020". AL.com. Archived from the original on February 2, 2018. Retrieved February 1, 2018.
  30. ^ Poe, Kelly (April 20, 2018). "Yes, Birmingham is again vying for the Democratic national convention". AL.com. Archived from the original on April 20, 2018. Retrieved April 20, 2018.
  31. ^ "2020 DNC to be held at Wisconsin Center in Milwaukee, state delegations urged not to travel". FOX6Now.com. June 24, 2020. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  32. ^ a b c Epstein, Reid J. (June 24, 2020). "Democratic Convention Moves to Smaller Venue, as Delegates Are Urged to Stay Away". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 24, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  33. ^ "2020 DNC pulled from Fiserv Forum, will move toward mostly virtual event". CBS58. June 24, 2020. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  34. ^ Gabriel Debenedetti, Kaine calls for eliminating superdelegates: Hillary Clinton's VP sides with Bernie Sanders in a fight that's divided Democrats Archived July 22, 2018, at the Wayback Machine, Politico (November 15, 2017).
  35. ^ Bowden, John (December 7, 2017). "DNC leaders call for 'significant' cut in Dem superdelegates". Thehill.com. The Hill. Archived from the original on December 13, 2017. Retrieved December 13, 2017.
  36. ^ O'Malley Dillon, Jen, and Cohen, Larry. "Report of the Unity Reform Commission" Archived April 27, 2019, at the Wayback Machine, Dec. 8–9, 2017.
  37. ^ a b Herndon, Astead W. "Democrats Take Major Step to Reduce Role of Superdelegates" Archived July 22, 2018, at the Wayback Machine, The New York Times, July 11, 2018.
  38. ^ a b Levy, Adam. "A new, smaller role proposed for superdelegates" Archived July 23, 2018, at the Wayback Machine, CNN, June 8, 2018.
  39. ^ a b Levy, Adam (August 25, 2019). "DNC changes superdelegate rules in presidential nomination process". CNN. Archived from the original on October 31, 2019. Retrieved September 23, 2019.
  40. ^ Epstein, Reid J. (August 25, 2018). "DNC Votes to Bar Superdelegates From Convention's First Presidential Ballot". The Wall Street Journal. Archived from the original on June 20, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  41. ^ "The Math Behind the Democratic Delegate Allocation 2020". thegreenpapers.com. Archived from the original on February 3, 2020. Retrieved January 23, 2020.
  42. ^ Putnam, Josh (April 24, 2020). "Sanders Could Lose A Third Of His Delegates, Making For A Messy Convention". FiveThirtyEight. ABC News Internet Ventures. Archived from the original on April 29, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  43. ^ Beam, Christopher (June 6, 2008). "Suspending vs. Withdrawing". Slate. Archived from the original on May 2, 2020. Retrieved May 2, 2020.
  44. ^ a b c Epstein, Reid J.; Lerer, Lisa (July 17, 2020). "The Democrats Are Downsizing Their Convention to Almost Nothing". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 3, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  45. ^ Glauber, Bill; Beck, Molly. "2020 DNC: 31 delegations to stay in Wisconsin and 26 in Illinois". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on October 29, 2019. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  46. ^ Jannene, Jeramey (July 23, 2019). "Transportation: No Streetcar Expansion in Time for DNC". Urban Milwaukee. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  47. ^ Sandler, Larry (December 13, 2019). "Why The Hop's Expansion Plans Went Off the Rails". Milwaukee Magazine. Archived from the original on April 12, 2020. Retrieved April 12, 2020.
  48. ^ Hauer, Sarah. "5 things Milwaukeeans can expect to see in the year before the 2020 Democratic National Convention". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on November 7, 2019. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  49. ^ a b c Glauber, Bill (February 10, 2020). "Milwaukee-based JCP Construction named construction general contractor for 2020 DNC". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on March 2, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  50. ^ a b "DNCC Names Hargrove as their Event Management Team for the 2020 Democratic National Convention in Milwaukee". Hargrove. February 10, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  51. ^ a b c d e f g h Meyer, Maredithe (October 24, 2019). "2020 DNC Host Committee announces official leadership structure". BizTimes – Milwaukee Business News. Archived from the original on October 28, 2019. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  52. ^ Kirchen, Rich (February 5, 2020). "Liz Gilbert, Adam Alonso fired from Milwaukee DNC Host Committee after 'toxic work environment' investigation". www.bizjournals.com. Milwaukee Business Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  53. ^ a b "Milwaukee 2020 DNC Host Committee announces new leadership team". FOX 6 Now Milwaukee. February 28, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  54. ^ a b c d e Herndon, Astead W.; Epstein, Reid J. (August 16, 2020). "It's Convention Time: 2-Minute Speeches, No Pomp, a Forlorn Milwaukee". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  55. ^ "Exclusive: Democrats, anticipating heated primary, set earlier 2020 convention date". CNN. Archived from the original on June 15, 2018. Retrieved June 15, 2018.
  56. ^ Evans, Brad (April 2, 2020). "DNC Convention delayed to August due to coronavirus". WISN. Archived from the original on April 3, 2020. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  57. ^ a b Nilsen, Ella (August 17, 2020). "The all-virtual Democratic National Convention, explained". Vox. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  58. ^ Levy, Adam; Stark, Liz (May 12, 2020). "DNC committee approves rule changes that could allow for virtual convention". CNN. Archived from the original on May 13, 2020. Retrieved May 16, 2020.
  59. ^ a b c d e "Anchored in Milwaukee, 2020 Democratic National Convention will be a "Convention Across America"". 2020 Democratic National Convention. 2020 Democratic National Convention Committee. June 24, 2020. Archived from the original on June 27, 2020. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  60. ^ "FAQ". 2020 Democratic National Convention. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  61. ^ Spicuzza, Mary; Glauber, Bill (June 24, 2020). "Scaled-back Democratic National Convention overhauled as state delegates no longer traveling to Milwaukee, event moved out of Fiserv Forum". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  62. ^ Glauber, Bill (July 17, 2020). "Members of Congress told not to travel to Milwaukee for 2020 DNC". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  63. ^ "Democratic vice-presidential candidate scheduled to give headlining speech in Milwaukee during DNC". TMJ4. July 30, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  64. ^ a b c d e f g h "Convention Speakers, Including Vice President Biden, Will Not Travel to Milwaukee to Protect Public Health". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 5, 2020. Archived from the original on August 6, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  65. ^ Zeleny, Jeff; Merica, Dan; Sullivan, Kate (August 5, 2020). "Joe Biden will no longer travel to Milwaukee to accept Democratic nomination". CNN. Archived from the original on August 5, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  66. ^ a b "Biden to accept Democratic nomination virtually as DNC further scales back 2020 convention". NBC News. August 5, 2020. Archived from the original on August 5, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  67. ^ a b Walker, Hunter. "Biden won't travel to Milwaukee to accept presidential nomination as coronavirus scuttles both political conventions". ca.news.yahoo.com. Yahoo News. Archived from the original on August 6, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  68. ^ a b c d e f Adgate, Brad (July 21, 2020). "This Year, TV Coverage Of Political Conventions Will Look Very Different". Forbes. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  69. ^ Stevens, Mark (August 2, 2020). "Milwaukee coronavirus limits put pinch on DNC facilities". CBS58. Archived from the original on August 4, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  70. ^ "Order #4.1" (PDF). city.milwaukee.gov. City of Milwaukee Health Department. July 30, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 1, 2020. Retrieved August 11, 2020.
  71. ^ a b c Jewell, Hannah (August 14, 2020). "'People are still paying attention:' Despite mostly-virtual format, protesters descend on Milwaukee for DNC". FOX 6 Now Milwaukee. Archived from the original on August 15, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  72. ^ a b Glauber, Bill (August 9, 2020). "'We kept trying': 2020 DNC organizers adjusted again and again, but ultimately could not outflank pandemic". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 9, 2020.
  73. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "Democratic National Convention Announces 2020 Convention Officers, Schedule of Events". 2020 Democratic National Convention. July 30, 2020. Archived from the original on August 4, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  74. ^ a b Atkins, Tony (August 6, 2020). "Wisconsin Center still looks forward to role in DNC hosting, production". TMJ4. WTMJ-TV. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  75. ^ a b Calvi, Jason (August 6, 2020). "DNC in Milwaukee now almost entirely virtual, but protesters say 'we aren't going to stay home'". FOX 6 Now Milwaukee. WITI-TV. Archived from the original on August 7, 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  76. ^ a b c d "How to Watch the 2020 Democratic National Convention". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 7, 2020. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 9, 2020.
  77. ^ a b c d Schmidt, Rose (August 16, 2020). "DNC gives first look inside Wisconsin Center control room, stage ahead of convention". CBS58. WDJT-TV. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  78. ^ a b Smith, Matt (August 17, 2020). "DNC's virtual control room takes over part of Wisconsin Center". WISN. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  79. ^ a b c d e f g h "Democrats Announce Wisconsin Speakers and Schedule Updates for 2020 Democratic National Convention: "Uniting America"". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 11, 2020. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 11, 2020.
  80. ^ "The 2020 DNC once sought 15,000 volunteers. Now it's notifying many who signed up they won't be needed". www.jsonline.com. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. August 3, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  81. ^ "Milwaukee Bucks Owners Could Wind Up In Court With Democratic Party". Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  82. ^ Comerford, Zoe (August 4, 2020). "Wisconsin Center prepares for DNC, releases COVID-19 protocol". Marquette Wire. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  83. ^ Wegmann, Philip; Crabtree, Susan (July 23, 2020). "Feds to Spend $100 Million on Convention Security | RealClearPolitics". www.realclearpolitics.com. Archived from the original on July 26, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  84. ^ a b c Dirr, Alison; Glauber, Bill (July 15, 2020). "Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett calls for 'peacekeeping' as police seek DNC equipment". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on July 18, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  85. ^ "DNC 2020 security perimeter announced for downtown Milwaukee". WTMJ. January 17, 2020. Archived from the original on April 6, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  86. ^ a b "'Potential train wreck:' Milwaukee leaders express security concerns as DNC draws near". FOX 6 Now Milwaukee. July 24, 2020. Archived from the original on August 1, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  87. ^ a b Andrea, Lawrence (July 27, 2020). "Protesters plan to make presence felt during DNC despite scaled back Milwaukee convention". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  88. ^ a b c d e Spicuzza, Alison Dirr and Mary (August 12, 2020). "Security footprint for pared-down Democratic National Convention released". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  89. ^ Smith, Matt (August 14, 2020). "Inside the DNC security zone". Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  90. ^ Calvi, Jason (August 14, 2020). "DNC road closures begin Friday night; Secret Service security plans take effect". FOX 6 Now Milwaukee. WITI-TV. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  91. ^ a b Meyer, Maredithe (August 17, 2020). "Day one of virtual DNC features heavy security, quiet streets in downtown Milwaukee". BizTimes - Milwaukee Business News. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  92. ^ Dirr, Alison. "Milwaukee could see 1,100 police officers from outside the city at Democratic National Convention". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on July 24, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  93. ^ Moreno, J. Edward (July 29, 2020). "More than 100 police agencies pull out of Democratic National Convention security contracts". TheHill. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  94. ^ "Police preparing for unknowns at Democratic convention". AP NEWS. Associated Press. August 4, 2020. Archived from the original on August 7, 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  95. ^ Spicuzza, Mary (February 24, 2020). "Milwaukee River bridges may not be allowed to open during DNC, blocking boat tours". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on March 30, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  96. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on October 22, 2019. Retrieved August 8, 2020.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  97. ^ https://entourageeventsgroup.com/dnc2020/. Missing or empty |title= (help)[permanent dead link]
  98. ^ "Democratic National Convention 2020 Catering". www.zillihospitalitygroup.com. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  99. ^ a b c d e f g h ""Uniting America"—Democrats Announce Themes for Four Nights of Convention". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 7, 2020. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 8, 2020.
  100. ^ a b c d Johnson, Ted (August 1, 2020). "Networks Plot Coverage Of Scaled-Back Political Conventions: "We Have Never Seen Anything Like This"". Deadline. Archived from the original on August 2, 2020. Retrieved August 2, 2020.
  101. ^ a b "History of the convention balloon drop". CBS News. July 23, 2016. Archived from the original on February 10, 2017. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  102. ^ "DemDaily: Democrats Announce Virtual Convention!". June 25, 2020. Archived from the original on June 29, 2020. Retrieved June 26, 2020.
  103. ^ Greenwood, Max (August 13, 2020). "Biden, Harris to address Democratic convention from Chase Center in Delaware". TheHill. Archived from the original on August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  104. ^ a b Stelter, Brian (August 17, 2020). "The Democratic convention in the age of a pandemic: hundreds of live feeds and four stages". CNN. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  105. ^ a b c d Newman, Meredith (August 13, 2020). "Joe Biden, Kamala Harris to give DNC convention speeches in Wilmington, Delaware". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on August 14, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  106. ^ Kate Sullivan and Eric Bradner. "Bernie Sanders endorses Joe Biden for president". CNN. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2020.
  107. ^ "Democratic National Convention Committee Announces Series of Virtual Platform Hearings". Democrats. June 26, 2020. Archived from the original on June 30, 2020. Retrieved June 30, 2020.
  108. ^ "2020 DNC Platform Standing Committee". January 25, 2020. Archived from the original on July 27, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  109. ^ a b c d "DemDaily: Rolling Out the Party Platform". July 2, 2020. Archived from the original on July 6, 2020. Retrieved July 6, 2020.
  110. ^ a b Eliza Collins (June 27, 2020). "Democrats Fend Off Attempts to Back Medicare for All in Platform". The Wall Street Journal.
  111. ^ "Democrats propose new draft to party platform, revealing shifts in focus since 2016". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on July 22, 2020. Retrieved July 22, 2020.
  112. ^ "Democrats Meet Virtually To Approve Platform That Builds Off Biden-Sanders Effort". NPR.org. Archived from the original on July 28, 2020. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  113. ^ Detrow, Scott. "Democrats Meet Virtually To Approve Platform That Builds Off Biden-Sanders Effort". www.wxxinews.org. Archived from the original on July 28, 2020. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  114. ^ Eric Bradner; Arlette Saenz; Sarah Mucha; Kate Sullivan; Jeff Simon. "Joint Biden-Sanders task forces unveil progressive platform after months of negotiations". CNN. Archived from the original on July 10, 2020. Retrieved July 10, 2020.
  115. ^ a b c d e Paul Steinhauser & Marisa Schultz (August 19, 2020). "Democrats adopt party platform at DNC amid some progressive dissent".
  116. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Andrew Prokop (August 18, 2020). "The Democratic platform, explained". Vox.
  117. ^ Durkee, Alison (July 28, 2020). "More Than 700 Democratic Delegates Vow To Reject Platform If It Doesn't Include Medicare For All". Forbes. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  118. ^ "Rashida Tlaib votes against Democratic Party platform and for Sanders". Axios. August 16, 2020.
  119. ^ "Ro Khanna Announces 'No' Vote on DNC Platform Over Exclusion of 'Moral Issue of Our Time'—Medicare for All". Common Dreams. August 13, 2020.
  120. ^ Glauber, Bill (March 26, 2019). "Joe Solmonese named chief executive of 2020 Milwaukee Democratic convention". Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 28, 2019.
  121. ^ Glauber, Bill (June 1, 2020). "Joe Biden steps up convention organizing by naming advisers to 2020 DNC in Milwaukee". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  122. ^ Glauber, Mary Spicuzza and Bill (June 24, 2020). "Scaled-back Democratic National Convention overhauled as state delegates no longer traveling to Milwaukee, event moved out of Fiserv Forum". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on June 26, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  123. ^ Zelst, Christina Van (August 16, 2020). "Wisconsin Center prepped for mostly virtual 2020 DNC: 'Backbone for our operation'". FOX 6 Now Milwaukee. WITI-TV. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  124. ^ a b c d e "Democrats announce convention schedule, party officers for 2020 gathering transformed by coronavirus". ABC News. Archived from the original on July 30, 2020. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  125. ^ Glauber, Mary Spicuzza and Bill (June 24, 2020). "DNC announces sweeping changes to convention, but Biden will still accept nomination in Milwaukee". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  126. ^ "Democrats announce convention schedule, party officers for 2020 gathering transformed by coronavirus". ABC News. Archived from the original on July 30, 2020. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  127. ^ a b "Democratic Convention 2020". thegreenpapers.com. Archived from the original on March 6, 2019. Retrieved February 25, 2020.
  128. ^ a b Stevens, Matt (February 22, 2020). "How to Win the Democratic Nomination, and Why It Could Get Complicated". The New York Times. Archived from the original on April 24, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  129. ^ "Associated Press Election Services – Delegate Tracker". Associated Press. Archived from the original on April 30, 2020. Retrieved April 30, 2020.
  130. ^ Deese, Kaelan (July 11, 2020). "DNC outlines remote voting process for Milwaukee convention". TheHill. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  131. ^ Dan Merica. "Democrats reveal remote voting rules for convention amid pandemic". CNN. Archived from the original on July 13, 2020. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  132. ^ Mary Spicuzza; Daniel Bice. "Report: Joe Biden may end up giving the only major Democratic convention speech from Milwaukee". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on July 22, 2020. Retrieved July 22, 2020.
  133. ^ a b c "Democrats Announce Inspiring Lineup of Americans Who Will Speak at the 2020 Democratic National Convention: "Uniting America"". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 10, 2020. Archived from the original on August 13, 2020. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  134. ^ Collinson, Stephen. "Analysis: A risky roll call turns into a surprise moment of national unity". CNN. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  135. ^ Behrmann, Savannah. "'Looks like America': DNC's virtual roll call, the first of its kind, widely lauded online". USA TODAY. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  136. ^ Vanderhoof, Erin. "The DNC Roll Call Was an American Travelogue—and an Unexpected Delight". Vanity Fair. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  137. ^ Cauterucci, Christina (August 19, 2020). "The DNC's Roll Call Made Me Feel More Patriotic Than I Have in Years". Slate Magazine. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  138. ^ a b Two of the 770 superdelegate votes were not assigned to any state and did not vote.
  139. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv bw bx by bz ca cb cc cd ce cf cg ch ci cj ck cl cm cn co "Democratic National Convention: Day 2". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 19, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  140. ^ Deliso, Meredith. "DNC's roll call across America a highlight of a largely virtual convention". ABC NEWS. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  141. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Vanderhoof, Erin (August 19, 2020). "The DNC Roll Call Was an American Travelogue—and an Unexpected Delight". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  142. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae Dan Merica. "Former opponents and Democratic activists to officially nominate Biden in revamped roll call vote". CNN. Archived from the original on August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  143. ^ Alaska Native leader featured in DNC roll call, KTUU (August 19, 2020).
  144. ^ Arizona teacher gets turn in spotlight, as Democrats officially nominate Biden, Cronkite News (Arizona PBS) (August 10, 2020).
  145. ^ Emilie Munson, Firefighters' union chief wins CT roll call honors at Democratic convention, CT Insider (August 18, 2020).
  146. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  147. ^ Phil Drake, Montana delegation delivers 24 votes for Biden, 1 for Sanders, Great Falls Tribune (August 18, 2020).
  148. ^ Grace Kraemer, New Town man gets to cast North Dakota's Democratic delegates for president, KFYR-TV (August 19, 2020).
  149. ^ Member of Standing Rock Sioux Tribe represents South Dakota during DNC, KOTA-TV (August 19, 2020).
  150. ^ "PERMANENT Procedural Rules of the 2020 Democratic National Convention" (PDF). 2020 Democratic National Convention. July 30, 2020. pp. 4–5.
  151. ^ "Democratic National Convention: Day 1". MSNBC. YouTube. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  152. ^ "Democratic National Convention (Day 1)". C-SPAN. YouTube. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  153. ^ "Full Democratic National Convention Feed - Night 1". YouTube. PBS NewsHour. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  154. ^ "WATCH LIVE: 2020 Democratic National Convention (Day 1)". YouTube.com. Politico. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  155. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa "Democratic National Convention: Day 1". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  156. ^ "[ASL] Democratic National Convention: Day 1". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  157. ^ "Convención Nacional Demócrata: Día 1". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  158. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t "Democratic National Convention Schedule (August 17–20)". 2020 Democratic National Convention. Archived from the original on August 16, 2020. Retrieved August 16, 2020.
  159. ^ a b c d e f g Mucha, Sarah (August 17, 2020). "Eva Longoria, Tracee Ellis Ross, Kerry Washington and Julia Louis-Dreyfus announced as Democratic convention emcees". CNN. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  160. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah "Democrats Announce Highlights from Opening Night of the 2020 Democratic National Convention: Uniting America". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  161. ^ a b c "Watch Live: Democratic National Convention: Day 1 MSNBC". YouTube. MSNBC. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  162. ^ Keller, Erin (August 17, 2020). "Maggie Rogers performs from Scarborough during first night of DNC". newscentermaine.com. Archived from the original on August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  163. ^ "John Kasich's DNC speech: Full video - CNN Video". CNN. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  164. ^ Ross, Sean (August 18, 2020). "Doug Jones at DNC: Biden 'exactly the leader our country needs right now'". Yellowhammer News. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  165. ^ "Amy Klobuchar's DNC speech: Full video - CNN Video". CNN. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  166. ^ a b Dwilson, Stephanie Dube (August 18, 2020). "Where Is Michelle Obama Speaking from at the Convention? See Her Beautiful Home". Heavy.com. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  167. ^ a b c d e f g "Democratic National Convention (Day 2)". C-SPAN. YouTube. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  168. ^ "Watch Live: Democratic National Convention: Day 2 | MSNBC". MSNBC. YouTube. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  169. ^ "Full Democratic National Convention Feed - Night 2". YouTube. PBS NewsHour. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  170. ^ "WATCH LIVE: 2020 Democratic National Convention (Day 2)". YouTube.com. Politico. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  171. ^ "[ASL] Democratic National Convention: Day 2". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 19, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  172. ^ "Convención Nacional Demócrata: Día 2". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 19, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  173. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai "Democrats Announce Highlights for Night Two of the 2020 Democratic National Convention: "Uniting America"". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  174. ^ a b c d "Democrats Unveil A New Kind of Convention Keynote". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 16, 2020. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 16, 2020.
  175. ^ Rice, Nicholas. "Security Guard Who Went Viral in Meeting with Joe Biden Endorses Him at DNC". People Magazine. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  176. ^ Gomez, Melissa (August 18, 2020). "Security guard who blurted 'I love you' to Joe Biden helps nominate him at the DNC". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  177. ^ Romano, Aja (August 19, 2020). "Jacquelyn Brittany's viral elevator moment made her the star of a populist DNC fairy tale". Vox. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  178. ^ "Kevin Johnson's DNC speech: Full video - CNN Video". CNN. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  179. ^ a b c "John Kerry's DNC speech: Full video - CNN Video". CNN. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  180. ^ a b "Colin Powell's DNC speech: Full video - CNN Video". CNN. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  181. ^ a b Holveck, Brandon (August 18, 2020). "DNC in Delaware: Delaware officials to sue USPS and more updates". Delaware Online. The News Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  182. ^ "New Convention Video Highlights Biden Plan for One of America's Toughest Challenges: Health Care". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 18, 2020.
  183. ^ "Colorado cancer survivor talks health care with Joe Biden on prime-time panel". The Gazette (Colorado Springs). August 19, 2020.
  184. ^ "An Unlikely Friendship: Joe Biden and John McCain". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 18, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  185. ^ "Democratic National Convention (Day 4)". C-SPAN. YouTube. August 19, 2020. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  186. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab "Democratic National Convention: Day 3". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 20, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  187. ^ "[ASL] Democratic National Convention: Day 3". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 20, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  188. ^ "Convención Nacional Demócrata: Día 3". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 20, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  189. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x "Democrats Announce Highlights for Night Three of the 2020 Democratic National Convention: "Uniting America"". Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  190. ^ Glauber, Bill (July 29, 2020). "2020 DNC will meet for just two hours nightly during Milwaukee convention". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 1, 2020. Retrieved August 3, 2020.
  191. ^ a b Zeleny, Jeff; Merica, Dan (August 19, 2020). "Obama to deliver DNC address from Philadelphia to underscore American democracy". CNN. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  192. ^ "Democratic National Convention (Day 4)". C-SPAN. YouTube. August 20, 2020. Retrieved November 6, 2020.
  193. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u "Democratic National Convention: Day 4". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 21, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  194. ^ "[ASL] Democratic National Convention: Day 4". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 21, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  195. ^ "Convención Nacional Demócrata: Día 4". YouTube.com. 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 21, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  196. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae "Democrats Announce Highlights for Final Night of the 2020 Democratic National Convention". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  197. ^ Kreutz, Liz. "Gov. Newsom talks climate change amid state's wildfires at Democratic National Convention: 'Climate change is real'". KGO-TV. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  198. ^ "Democrats Announce Additional Speakers and Schedule Updates for 2020 Democratic National Convention: "Uniting America"". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 11, 2020. Archived from the original on August 14, 2020. Retrieved August 11, 2020.
  199. ^ a b Bowden, Ebony. "Michael Bloomberg tells America to 'fire' Trump in DNC speech". New York Post. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  200. ^ "How will the 2020 Democratic National Convention work? Yahoo News Explains". news.yahoo.com. Yahoo! News. August 13, 2020. Archived from the original on August 13, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  201. ^ "Democrats Announce Musical Performances for 2020 Democratic National Convention: "Uniting America"". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 14, 2020. Archived from the original on August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  202. ^ Viserclose, Matt (August 10, 2010). "Democrats will highlight everyday Americans in their prime-time convention lineup". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on August 10, 2020. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  203. ^ Brewster, Jack (August 10, 2020). "Democratic Convention To Feature Former Trump Voters In Unity Pitch". Forbes. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 10, 2020.
  204. ^ "Virtual Policy Roundtables". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 11, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  205. ^ "Democratic National Convention Coalitions & Partner Organizations: Schedule of Events". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 11, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  206. ^ "Democratic National Convention Interfaith Welcome Service". 2020 Democratic National Convention. August 11, 2020. Archived from the original on August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  207. ^ a b Groppe, Maureen (August 18, 2020). "'He does it for you': Jill Biden gives personal speech as her husband receives DNC nomination". USA TODAY. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  208. ^ Henney, Megan (August 18, 2020). "Jill Biden, in DNC speech from former high school classroom, says husband will 'make the nation whole'". Fox News. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  209. ^ a b c d "Fact Check: Biden's Address To The DNC, Annotated". NPR.org. National Public Radio. August 21, 2020. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  210. ^ Oprysko, Caitlin. "Biden: 'I will be an ally of the light, not the darkness'". POLITICO. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  211. ^ Jarvis, Jacob (August 21, 2020). "Biden Didn't Once Mention Trump's Name in DNC Speech, Avoiding Trap Clinton Fell Into". Newsweek. Retrieved August 28, 2020.
  212. ^ a b c d "Michael Bloomberg 2020 DNC Speech Transcript". Rev.
  213. ^ a b c "Transcript: Pete Buttigieg's DNC remarks". CNN. August 21, 2020. Retrieved August 24, 2020.
  214. ^ a b Ruthhart, Bill (August 20, 2020). "In DNC speech, Pete Buttigieg highlights his marriage as proof change can come with 'political courage'". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved August 24, 2020.
  215. ^ a b c d e f "Transcript: Bill Clinton's DNC speech". CNN. August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  216. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "Transcript: Hillary Clinton's DNC speech". CNN. August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  217. ^ a b c Spector, Joseph (August 17, 2020). "Cuomo criticizes federal COVID response in Democratic National Convention speech". Democrat and Chronicle. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  218. ^ Nelson, Steven (August 18, 2020). "Andrew Cuomo says 'COVID is the symptom not the illness' in DNC speech". New York Post. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  219. ^ a b c d "Buzz around DNC speech by 'regular kid' with stutter rivals reviews of Biden's". ABC News. August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 22, 2020.
  220. ^ a b c Stevens, Matt (August 19, 2020). "Kamala Harris Accepts Vice-Presidential Nomination: Full Transcript". The New York Times. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  221. ^ a b c d "Transcript: John Kasich's DNC speech". CNN. August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  222. ^ Borchardt, Jackie (August 19, 2020). "Where were the crossroads from John Kasich's Democratic convention speech? We found them". The Enquirer. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  223. ^ "WATCH: John Kerry calls Trump's foreign policy a nonstop 'blooper reel'". PBS NewsHour. August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  224. ^ Lapin, Tamar (August 19, 2020). "John Kerry calls Trump's foreign policy record a 'blooper reel' during DNC". New York Post. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  225. ^ a b "Transcript: Barack Obama's DNC speech". CNN. August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  226. ^ Herndon, Astead W.; Lerer, Lisa (August 20, 2020). "D.N.C. Recap: Barack Obama Warns of Trump's Threat to Democracy as Kamala Harris Accepts V.P. Nomination". The New York Times. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  227. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m "Transcript: Michelle Obama's DNC speech". CNN. August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  228. ^ a b c d "Michelle Obama warns at DNC that Trump is 'in over his head'". AP NEWS. Associated Press. August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  229. ^ a b c "Transcript: Nancy Pelosi's DNC remarks". CNN. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  230. ^ Homan, Timothy R. (August 20, 2020). "Pelosi paints Trump and McConnell as twin impediments to progress". TheHill. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  231. ^ a b c d e f "Transcript: Colin Powell's DNC remarks". CNN. August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  232. ^ a b c d "Transcript: Bernie Sanders' DNC speech". CNN. August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  233. ^ a b c Stevens, Matt (August 17, 2020). "Bernie Sanders Goes on Attack Against Trump and Urges Support for Biden". The New York Times. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  234. ^ a b c d "Schumer tells America: 'Trump has quit on you'". Newsday. Associated Press. August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  235. ^ a b c d Stevens, Matt; Paz, Isabella Grullón; Medina, Jennifer (August 17, 2020). "Kristin Urquiza, Whose Father Died of Covid, Denounces Trump at D.N.C." The New York Times. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  236. ^ a b Egan, Lauren (August 17, 2020). "Woman whose father died of COVID: 'His only pre-existing condition was trusting Donald Trump'". NBC News. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  237. ^ a b LeBlanc, Paul (August 18, 2020). "Woman who lost father to Covid-19: 'His only preexisting condition was trusting Donald Trump'". CNN. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  238. ^ Ting, Eric (August 18, 2020). "'His only preexisting condition was trusting Donald Trump': SF woman who lost father speaks at DNC". SFGate. Retrieved August 19, 2020.
  239. ^ "Transcript: Elizabeth Warren's DNC speech". CNN. August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  240. ^ Bidgood, Jess (August 19, 2020). "Warren touts Biden's economic plans in convention speech to help lure progressives - The Boston Globe". The Boston Globe. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  241. ^ North, Anna (August 20, 2020). "Elizabeth Warren made a crucial point at the DNC: Child care is "infrastructure for families"". Vox. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  242. ^ a b c d "Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer 2020 DNC Speech Transcript". Rev. August 17, 2020. Retrieved August 20, 2020.
  243. ^ a b Ring, Trudy (August 18, 2020). "Three Gay 'Rising Stars' Join DNC Keynote — One With His Fiancé". The Advocate.
  244. ^ Bollinger, Alex (August 17, 2020). "Three gay Democratic "rising stars" to give joint keynote address at convention". LGBTQ Nation.
  245. ^ Dvorak, Petula (August 19, 2020). "How 17 keynote speakers made the most realistic convention speech ever". The Washington Post. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  246. ^ Harris, Adam (August 19, 2020). "Why the Democrats' Keynote Fell Flat". The Atlantic. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  247. ^ "Protests continue leading up to DNC". FOX6 News Milwaukee. WITI-TV. August 16, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  248. ^ Smith, Matt (July 29, 2020). "Protesters still plan presence during DNC in Milwaukee". WISN. Archived from the original on July 30, 2020. Retrieved July 31, 2020.
  249. ^ a b c Kirchen, Rich (August 2, 2020). "Minimal activity so far for parade permits during the DNC". www.bizjournals.com. Milwaukee Business Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  250. ^ "DNC Delegates United for Peace protest war and military spending". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. August 16, 2020. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  251. ^ a b Marley, Patrick; Glauber, Bill (August 13, 2020). "Trump to campaign in Wisconsin on the day Democrats open virtual Milwaukee convention". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  252. ^ Kapur, Sahil (August 17, 2020). "'Just kind of sucks': Disappointed Milwaukee a political ghost town for the Democratic convention". NBC News. Archived from the original on August 18, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  253. ^ Glauber, Bill (August 13, 2020). "Mike Pence will be in Wisconsin as Democrats stage virtual convention from Milwaukee without Joe Biden". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  254. ^ a b Schmidt, Mitchell (August 15, 2020). "Democrats adapt to the downsized Milwaukee Democratic National Convention". madison.com. Wisconsin State Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  255. ^ Yount, Benjamin (August 14, 2020). "DNC protesters to march on President Trump's Oshkosh rally instead". APG of Wisconsin. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  256. ^ Parra, Esteban; Hughes, Isabel; Wilson, Xerxes. "Trump supporters protest Biden in Wilmington at DNC in Delaware". Delaware News Journal. Retrieved August 22, 2020.
  257. ^ a b c d e "For TV heads and viewers, conventions are largely a mystery". Martinsville Bulletin. Associated Press. July 29, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  258. ^ a b Garrison, Joey (August 7, 2020). "Exclusive: Joe Biden and Democrats unveil details of DNC convention including nightly themes, ways to watch". USA TODAY. Archived from the original on August 7, 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  259. ^ a b c d Johnson, Ted (August 11, 2020). "Networks Unveil Convention Coverage Plans; Broadcasters To Air One Hour Per Night". Deadline. Archived from the original on August 12, 2020. Retrieved August 12, 2020.
  260. ^ a b Grynbaum, Michael M. (July 5, 2020). "We Now Interrupt Your Regularly Scheduled Convention Programming". The New York Times. Archived from the original on August 7, 2020. Retrieved July 30, 2020.
  261. ^ a b c d e f g Foran, Chris (August 12, 2020). "2020 Democratic National Convention: No delegates, no Biden and not many national TV news crews". Milwaukee Journal Sentinel. Archived from the original on August 12, 2020. Retrieved August 13, 2020.
  262. ^ a b c d Kirchen, Rich (July 7, 2020). "Fox News keeps site at Deer Camp bar as TV networks scale down DNC coverage". www.bizjournals.com. Milwaukee Business Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  263. ^ a b c d Kirchen, Rich (August 5, 2020). "The news they were dreading: Biden-less DNC is the final heartbreaker for Milwaukee businesses". www.bizjournals.com. Milwaukee Business Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 5, 2020.
  264. ^ Kirchen, Rich (May 22, 2020). "CNN cancels plans for studios, dining at Turner Hall during Milwaukee DNC: Witt". www.bizjournals.com. Wisconsin Business Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 4, 2020.
  265. ^ Kirchen, Rich (August 12, 2020). "Good City Brewing joins list of Milwaukee venues losing TV network gigs as DNC goes virtual". www.bizjournals.com. Milwaukee Business Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 14, 2020.
  266. ^ Holveck, Brandon (August 16, 2020). "Downtown Wilmington prepares to play host to Democratic National Convention". The News Journal. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 18, 2020.
  267. ^ "Here is how you can watch the Democratic National Convention". TMJ4. WTMJ-TV. August 7, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 7, 2020.
  268. ^ Mucha, Sarah (August 14, 2020). "Biden campaign will host virtual watch parties to engage supporters as DNC goes almost entirely virtual". CNN. Archived from the original on August 15, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  269. ^ Curi, Peter (August 14, 2020). "Democratic National Convention watch parties in all 50 States". WJMN - UPMatters.com. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  270. ^ Hamad, Michael (August 16, 2020). "Connecticut delegates will host virtual DNC events, then watch Joe Biden accept presidential nomination at Dunkin' Donuts Park". Hartford Courant. Archived from the original on August 16, 2020. Retrieved August 17, 2020.
  271. ^ Murphy (August 14, 2020). "Democrats plan DNC drive-in party at Suffolk Downs to watch Warren speak". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved August 15, 2020.
  272. ^ Henney, Megan (August 20, 2020). "DNC drive-in: More than 100 cars expected outside convention for Biden, Harris' post-speech wave". Fox News. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  273. ^ "Democratic National Convention: Arizona Democrats gather at drive-in movie theater for Biden acceptance speech". MSN. August 20, 2020. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  274. ^ "Drive-in movie-style virtual watch party held in Milwaukee County Zoo parking lot". TMJ4. August 21, 2020. Retrieved August 21, 2020.
  275. ^ Grynbaum, Michael M. (August 21, 2020). "The TV Divide: Convention Ratings Surge on MSNBC as Fox News Dips". The New York Times.
  276. ^ a b Battaglio, Stephen (August 25, 2020). "Republican convention draws 17 million TV viewers, down 26% from 2016". Yahoo! News.
  277. ^ https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/18/media/dnc-ratings-2020-night-1/index.html
  278. ^ a b c d e f g h Metcalf, Mitch (August 21, 2020). "Democratic National Convention Television Ratings: Nights 1-4 | Showbuzz Daily". Showbuzz Daily.
  279. ^ Coster, Helen (August 26, 2020). "Republicans narrowly top Democrats in second-night convention TV audience". Reuters.
  280. ^ Palmeri, Christopher (August 26, 2020). "Melania Trump's Speech Lifts Republican TV Ratings on Second Night". Bloomberg.
  281. ^ Sandler, Rachel (August 27, 2020). "RNC TV Ratings Fall On Third Night". Forbes.
  282. ^ Palmeri, Christopher (August 20, 2020). "Convention Viewers Rise to 22.8 Million With Kamala Harris Speech". Bloomberg. Retrieved August 22, 2020.
  283. ^ "Media Advisory: Fourth Night of 2020 Democratic National Convention Draws 24.6 Million Viewers". Nielsen.
  284. ^ a b c Shepard, Steven. "Why Joe Biden's bounce might not be coming". POLITICO. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  285. ^ Reilly, Briana (August 22, 2020). "DNC recap: Programming, ratings, convention bounce and another chance for Milwaukee in 2024?". madison.com. The Capital Times. Retrieved September 14, 2020.
  286. ^ a b c d McLean, Scott (August 25, 2020). "Why Trump, like Biden, should not expect a post-convention polling bounce | Opinion". Newsweek. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  287. ^ Herndon, Astead W.; Karni, Annie (September 5, 2020). "The Latest Polls, the Great Non-Tightening: This Week in the 2020 Race". The New York Times. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
  288. ^ Mohyeldin, Ayman (September 2, 2020). "New polls show race virtually unchanged after conventions". MSNBC.com. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
  289. ^ Druke, Galen (September 2, 2020). "A FiveThirtyEight Forecast Update: Was There A Convention Bounce?". FiveThirtyEight. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
  290. ^ a b c d e f Enten, Harry (August 15, 2020). "Large convention bounces are unlikely In 2020". CNN. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  291. ^ a b Tumulty, Karen (August 18, 2020). "Opinion | Don't be surprised if Biden doesn't get a convention bounce in the polls. That's not the point". The Washington Post. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  292. ^ a b c Lauter, David (August 28, 2020). "Essential Politics: How Trump could win". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  293. ^ Pfeiffer, Dan (August 18, 2020). "How to Judge the Democratic Convention". messagebox.substack.com. Retrieved September 9, 2020.
  294. ^ Peters, Cameron (August 30, 2020). "Poll: Biden's approval rating got a convention bounce. Trump's didn't". Vox. Retrieved September 6, 2020.
  295. ^ Karson, Kendall (August 23, 2020). "Biden enjoys post-convention bump in favorability: POLL". ABC News. Retrieved September 14, 2020.

External links[edit]