Keegan Messing

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Keegan Messing
2017 Canadian Championships - Keegan Messing.jpg
Personal information
Country representedCanada
Former country(ies) representedUnited States
Born (1992-01-23) January 23, 1992 (age 26)
Girdwood, Anchorage, Alaska
ResidenceGirdwood, Alaska
CoachRalph Burghart
Former coachAnne Durham
ChoreographerLance Vipond
Former choreographerDouglas Webster, Rory Flack
Skating clubSherwood Fsc, Alberta, Canada
Began skating1995
ISU personal best scores
Combined total265.17
2018 Skate Canada
Short program95.05
2018 Skate Canada
Free skate170.32
2018 Winter Olympics

Keegan Messing (born January 23, 1992) is a Canadian-American figure skater. Representing Canada, he competed at the 2018 Winter Olympics, and has appeared at the World Championships. He is also the 2018 Nebelhorn Trophy champion, and won a silver medal in the Grand Prix of Figure Skating at the 2018 Skate Canada International. At the national level, he was the silver medalist at the 2018 Canadian Championships.

Previously, representing the United States, he was the two-time International Cup of Nice champion (2011, 2012) and the 2012 Nebelhorn Trophy bronze medalist. He placed fourth at the 2010 World Junior Championships.

Personal life[edit]

Keegan Messing was born on January 23, 1992, in Girdwood, Anchorage, Alaska, USA.[1][2] He has two brothers, Paxon and Tanner.[3] He holds dual U.S. and Canadian citizenship.[4] His mother was born in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, and is a great-granddaughter of Manzo Nagano.[5][6] His father is a firefighter.[7]

In October of 2018, he became engaged to his girlfriend Lane Hodson.[8]

Career[edit]

American years (1995-2014)[edit]

Messing at the 2012 Nebelhorn Trophy

Messing started skating at age 3 after watching the 1994 Winter Olympics in Lillehammer.[1] Naming Elvis Stojko as his biggest influence, Messing said: "Watching him skate made me want to skate". In addition to singles, Messing formerly competed in pair skating with Ellie Gottstein.[1]

Anne Durham coached Messing from 1995 to 1999.[3] He is now coached by Ralph Burghardt in Anchorage, Alaska.[9][10]

Messing won the junior silver medal at the 2009 U.S. Championships. The following season, he made his senior national debut, finishing ninth. He finished eighth at the 2011 U.S. Nationals.[11][12]

Messing won the 2011 Coupe de Nice after placing first in the short program and fourth in the free.[12] He then placed seventh at the 2012 U.S. Nationals, which would be his highest placement as an American senior. He won the bronze medal at the 2012 Nebelhorn Trophy, and repeated as the victor at the 2012 Coupe de Nice.[13]

At the 2013 U.S. Nationals, Messing placed sixteenth, followed by a twelfth-place finish the following year.

Early Canadian seasons (2014-2017)[edit]

In July 2014, Messing said that he would begin competing for Canada.[3] In the 2014–15 season, he won bronze at the Skate Canada Challenge and qualified for the 2015 Canadian Championships. He placed fifth at Nationals, representing a club in Sherwood Park, Alberta.[5]

In the 2015–16 season, Messing placed fifth at the 2015 CS Ondrej Nepela Trophy and eleventh at the 2015 Skate Canada International, his senior Grand Prix debut. He went on to place sixth at the 2016 Canadian Championships.

The 2016–17 season saw Messing compete at two Challenger events, placing fourth at the 2016 Autumn Classic International and winning a bronze medal at the 2016 Golden Spin of Zagreb. At the 2017 Canadian Championships, he again placed fifth.

2017–2018 season: Olympic and Worlds debut[edit]

Messing began the Olympic season at the 2017 Autumn Classic International, where he won the bronze medal behind Javier Fernandez and Yuzuru Hanyu. Competing on the Grand Prix circuit, he placed eighth at the 2017 Skate Canada International and fifth at the 2017 NHK Trophy.

Competing at the 2018 Canadian Championships that would decide the nation's delegation to the 2018 Winter Olympics, Messing placed third in both the short program and free skate, winning the silver medal behind Patrick Chan. Messing was named along with Chan to the Olympic team, as well as to the 2018 World Championships team alongside national bronze medalist Nam Nguyen. On qualifying for the Games, Messing said: "It would mean the last twenty-three years of training, the last twenty years with my coach and the amount of support I have from my hometown, from Canada, it would mean I did it for them and to myself. It would mean that I made something."[14]

Competing at the 2018 Winter Olympics in PyeongChang, South Korea, Messing finished twelfth overall.[15] At his World Championships debut, Messing placed sixth in the short program with a new personal best score, qualifying for the final flight of the free skate. Messing placed eleventh in the free skate following errors, for an eighth-place finish overall. Speaking afterward, Messing expressed dissatisfaction with the free skate, stating that "To go out there and miss a couple of elements I've been nailing all week is a little hurtful. Still I tried to keep my head up and give a good performance. I hope the crowd still loved it."[16]

2018–2019 season[edit]

Beginning the season at the 2018 Nebelhorn Trophy, Messing placed first in both segments to win the gold medal, his first international win while representing Canada.[17]

Competing on the Grand Prix, Messing placed first in the short program at the 2018 Skate Canada International, following mistakes by presumed frontrunner Shoma Uno. He then placed second in the free skate, behind Uno, to win the silver medal overall, his first Grand Prix medal.[18] At the 2018 Rostelecom Cup, he placed fifth, having placed seventh in the short program and sixth in the free program. Messing expressed his disappointment, stating: "I really had to fight for everything. I can leave here knowing I gave it a solid fight."[19]

Programs[edit]

Season Short program Free skating Exhibition
2018–2019
[1]
  • The Sober Dawn
    (from City Lights)
    by Charlie Chaplin
  • The Reel Chaplin: A Symphonic Adventure, Pt. 2
    by Charlie Chaplin
    choreo. by Lance Vipond
2017–2018
[20]
  • The Sober Dawn
    (from City Lights)
    by Charlie Chaplin
  • The Reel Chaplin: A Symphonic Adventure, Pt. 2
    by Charlie Chaplin
    choreo. by Lance Vipond
2016–2017
[22][23]
2015–2016
[9]
  • The Pink Panther Theme
    by Henry Mancini
    choreo. by Douglas Webster
2014–2015
[24]
  • Always Look on the Bright Side of Life
    (from Monty Python's Life of Brian)
    by John Altman
    choreo. by Douglas Webster
2013–2014
[3]
  • The Mask of Zorro
    by James Horner
2012–2013
[24][25]
  • Sing, Sing, Sing
    by Louis Prima
    performed by Benny Goodman
    choreo. by Rory Flack


2011–2012
[24][3]
  • Pirates of the Caribbean
  • Trashin' the Camp
    (from Tarzan)

  • Rocky

2010–2011
[10]
2009-2010
[24][3]
  • The Incredible Hulk
    by Craig Armstrong
2007–2009
[3]

Competitive highlights[edit]

GP: Grand Prix; CS: Challenger Series; JGP: Junior Grand Prix

For Canada[edit]

International[26]
Event 14–15 15–16 16–17 17–18 18–19
Olympics 12th
Worlds 8th
GP Rostelecom Cup 5th
GP NHK Trophy 5th
GP Skate Canada 11th 8th 2nd
CS Autumn Classic 4th 3rd
CS Golden Spin 3rd
CS Nebelhorn 1st
CS Ondrej Nepela 5th
National[2]
Canadian Champ. 5th 6th 5th 2nd
SC Challenge 3rd 3rd
WD = Withdrew

For the United States[edit]

International[26]
Event 02–03 03–04 04–05 05–06 06–07 07–08 08–09 09–10 10–11 11–12 12–13 13–14
Cup of Nice 1st 1st
Nebelhorn Trophy 3rd
International: Junior[26]
Junior Worlds 4th 4th
JGP Final 5th
JGP Czech Republic 4th 4th
JGP Poland 6th
JGP Romania 1st
JGP U.K. 13th 2nd
Gardena 6th J
National[3]
U.S. Champ. 3rd N 5th J 2nd J 9th 8th 7th 16th 12th
U.S. Junior Champ. 5th V 6th I 9th I
Pacific Coast 1st N 2nd J 1st J 2nd
Northwest Pacific 1st V 1st V 1st I 1st I 1st N
Levels: V = Juvenile, I = Intermediate; N = Novice, J. = Junior

Detailed results[edit]

Small medals for short and free programs awarded only at ISU Championships.

Senior career[edit]

2018–19 season
Date Event SP FS Total
November 16–18, 2018 2018 Rostelecom Cup 7
73.83
6
146.92
5
220.75
October 26–28, 2018 2018 Skate Canada International 1
95.05
2
170.12
2
265.17
September 26–29, 2018 2018 CS Nebelhorn Trophy 1
90.63
1
166.53
1
257.16
2017–18 season
Date Event SP FS Total
March 19–25, 2018 2018 World Championships 6
93.00
11
159.30
8
252.30
February 14–25, 2018 2018 Winter Olympics 10
85.11
12
170.32
12
255.43
January 8–14, 2018 2018 Canadian Championships 3
90.98
3
173.60
2
259.25
November 10–12, 2017 2017 NHK Trophy 5
80.13
6
155.67
5
235.80
October 27–29, 2017 2017 Skate Canada International 5
82.17
10
135.58
8
217.75
September 20–23, 2017 2017 Autumn Classic International 4
86.33
3
161.97
3
248.30
2016–17 season
Date Event SP FS Total
January 16–22, 2017 2017 Canadian Championships 8
72.09
5
158.95
5
231.04
December 7–10, 2016 2016 CS Golden Spin of Zagreb 2
76.39
6
146.91
3
223.30
Sept. 29 – Oct. 1, 2016 2016 CS Autumn Classic International 3
75.41
4
139.69
4
215.10
2015–16 season
Date Event SP FS Total
January 18–24, 2016 2016 Canadian Championships 4
77.20
6
144.30
6
221.50
Oct. 30 – Nov. 1, 2015 2015 Skate Canada 10
67.13
11
115.12
11
182.25
October 1–3, 2015 2015 Ondrej Nepela Trophy 4
73.16
5
122.51
5
195.67
2014–15 season
Date Event SP FS Total
January 19–25, 2015 2015 Canadian Championships 6
70.00
5
138.17
5
208.17
2013–14 season
Date Event SP FS Total
January 5–12, 2014 2014 U.S. Championships 14
61.15
11
136.30
12
197.45
2012–13 season
Date Event SP FS Total
January 19–27, 2013 2013 U.S. Championships 13
64.06
16
123.28
16
187.34
October 24–28, 2012 2012 Cup of Nice 1
80.11
2
144.33
1
224.44
September 27–29, 2012 2012 Nebelhorn Trophy 3
68.56
4
142.22
3
210.78
2011–12 season
Date Event SP FS Total
January 22–29, 2012 2012 U.S. Championships 5
76.66
12
135.81
7
212.47
October 26–30, 2011 2011 Coupe de Nice 1
77.75
4
125.67
1
203.42
2010–11 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
Feb. 27 – March 6, 2011 2011 World Junior Championships Junior 1
72.58
7
122.49
4
195.07
January 22–30, 2011 2011 U.S. Championships Junior 4
69.79
8
143.50
8
213.29
September 22–26, 2010 2010 Junior Grand Prix Japan Junior 2
68.52
8
106.90
5
175.42
October 13–16, 2010 2010 Junior Grand Prix, Czech Republic Junior 4
61.53
4
116.37
4
177.90
September 8–12, 2010 2010 Junior Grand Prix Romania Junior 2
65.33
1
122.05
1
187.38
2009–10 season
Date Event Level SP FS Total
March 8–14, 2010 2010 World Junior Championships Junior 2
68.90
4
128.13
4
197.03
January 14–24, 2010 2010 U.S. Championships (Junior) Junior 12
63.38
8
126.97
9
190.35
September 9–13, 2009 2009 JGP Toruń Cup Junior 11
45.73
3
107.73
6
153.46

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Keegan MESSING: 2018/2019". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 25, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Keegan Messing". Skate Canada. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "Keegan Messing". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on July 1, 2018.
    Earlier versions:
    2009 to 2013 at the Wayback Machine (archive index)
    2007 to 2008 at the Wayback Machine (archive index)
  4. ^ Hills, Jason (December 4, 2015). "Sherwood Park skater Keegan Messing lives his all-Canadian dream". Edmonton Journal.
  5. ^ a b Jones, Shane (February 19, 2015). "Keegan not Messing around". Sherwood Park News. Archived from the original on April 8, 2015.
  6. ^ Barnes, Dan (February 8, 2018). "Meet Keegan Messing: The next generation of Canadian Olympic figure skating". National Post. Retrieved 2018-10-28.
  7. ^ "Profile". keeganmessing.com. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016.
  8. ^ Smith, Beverley (October 25, 2018). "A Proposal, Alaska Style".
  9. ^ a b "Keegan MESSING: 2015/2016". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 27, 2016.
  10. ^ a b "Keegan MESSING: 2010/2011". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on August 16, 2011.
  11. ^ Rutherford, Lynn (July 17, 2011). "Messing's 'Pirates of the Caribbean' takes home gold". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved July 18, 2011.
  12. ^ a b Brannen, Sarah S.; Meekins, Drew (November 9, 2011). "The Inside Edge: Gilles and Poirier skate, play; Snow in Alaska". IceNetwork.com. Archived from the original on June 30, 2018.
  13. ^ Flade, Tatjana (September 30, 2012). "2012 Nebelhorn Trophy". Golden Skate.
  14. ^ Flett, Ted (January 14, 2018). "Take Ten: Chan makes history". Golden Skate.
  15. ^ "Athlete Profile - Keegan MESSING". pyeongchang2018.com. Archived from the original on April 20, 2018.
  16. ^ "Girdwood's Messing finishes 8th at the World Figure Skating Championships". Anchorage Daily News. March 24, 2018.
  17. ^ Smith, Beverley (September 29, 2018). "Canada's Messing skates to gold in men's event at Nebelhorn Trophy".
  18. ^ "Uno defends Skate Canada title". Golden Skate. October 27, 2018.
  19. ^ "Keegan Messing climbs to fifth at ISU Grand Prix". Skate Canada. November 17, 2018.
  20. ^ "Keegan MESSING: 2017/2018". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on May 29, 2018.
  21. ^ ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating 2017 Skate Canada International - Gala Exhibition (Television production). Eurosport. October 29, 2017.
  22. ^ Smith, Beverley (January 24, 2017). "Keegan Messing: his excellent adventure". Archived from the original on October 25, 2017.
  23. ^ 2017 Canadian Tire Skating Championships - Men's short (Television production). TSN. January 22, 2017.
  24. ^ a b c d "Programs". keeganmessing.com. Archived from the original on November 26, 2014.
  25. ^ "Keegan MESSING: 2012/2013". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 1, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c "Competition Results: Keegan MESSING". International Skating Union. Archived from the original on October 26, 2018.

External links[edit]