Lennart Augustsson

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Lennart Augustsson is a Swedish computer scientist. He was previously a lecturer at the Computing Science Department at Chalmers University of Technology. His research field is functional programming and implementations of functional languages.[1]

Augustsson has worked for Carlstedt Research and Technology, Sandburst, Credit Suisse, Standard Chartered Bank, Facebook, and is currently employed by X (company).[2]

Augustsson is the author of:

He was also a co-developer, with Thomas Johnsson, of Lazy ML,[8] a functional programming language developed in the early 1980s, prior to Miranda and Haskell. LML is a strongly typed, statically scoped implementation of ML, with lazy evaluation. The key innovation of LML was to demonstrate how to compile a lazy functional language. Until then, lazy languages had been implemented via interpreted graph reduction. LML compiled to G-machine code.[citation needed]

Augustsson was intimately involved in early LPMud development, both in the LPMUD driver and the CD mudlib. His MUD community pseudonym is Marvin.[9]

Augustsson has written three winning entries in the International Obfuscated C Code Contest:

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Commercial Users of Functional Programming -- Lennart Augustsson". Archived from the original on 8 February 2012. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  2. ^ "Lennart Augustsson". LinkedIn profile. Retrieved 29 March 2017.
  3. ^ "Cayenne -- A language with dependent types". Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  4. ^ "Haskell Implementations". Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  5. ^ "Chapter 13 USB Devices". Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  6. ^ "Parallel Haskell". Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  7. ^ "Bluespec -- Designer's Perspective" (PDF). Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  8. ^ Augustsson, Lennart (1984). "A Compiler for Lazy ML". Proceedings of the 1984 ACM Symposium on LISP and functional programming. Retrieved 18 September 2016.
  9. ^ "Common Expressions LPMud". Retrieved 18 September 2016.[permanent dead link]

External links[edit]