This is a good article. Click here for more information.

Neil Simon Theatre

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Neil Simon Theatre
Alvin Theatre (1927–1983)
Neil Simon Theatre (48269598196).jpg
Showing The Cher Show, 2019
Address250 West 52nd Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′47″N 73°59′04″W / 40.76306°N 73.98444°W / 40.76306; -73.98444Coordinates: 40°45′47″N 73°59′04″W / 40.76306°N 73.98444°W / 40.76306; -73.98444
OwnerNederlander Organization
TypeBroadway
Capacity1,362
ProductionMJ the Musical
Construction
OpenedNovember 22, 1927
Years active1927–present
ArchitectHerbert J. Krapp
Website
broadwaydirect.com/theatre/neil-simon-theatre/
DesignatedAugust 6, 1985[1]
Reference no.1305[1]
Designated entityFacade
DesignatedAugust 6, 1985[2]
Reference no.1306[2]
Designated entityAuditorium interior

The Neil Simon Theatre, originally the Alvin Theatre, is a Broadway theater at 250 West 52nd Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1927, the theater was designed by Herbert J. Krapp and was built for Alex A. Aarons and Vinton Freedley. The original name was an amalgamation of Aarons's and Freedley's first names; the theater was renamed for playwright Neil Simon in 1983. The Simon has 1,362 seats across two levels and is operated by the Nederlander Organization. Both the facade and the auditorium interior are New York City landmarks.

The facade is divided into two sections: the six-story stage house to the west and the five-story auditorium to the east. The ground floor is clad with terracotta blocks and contains an entrance with a marquee. The upper stories of both sections are made of brick and terracotta; the auditorium facade has arched windows, niches, and a central pediment, while the stage house has a more plain design. The interior is designed in the Adam style and includes two lobbies and a mezzanine-level lounge. The auditorium consists of a ground-level orchestra and one balcony with boxes. The theater interiors are decorated with paneling and plasterwork, and the auditorium has a domed ceiling. Above the auditorium were three stories of offices.

Alexander Pincus and M. L. Goldstone developed the Alvin Theatre, which opened on November 22, 1927, with Funny Face. Aarons and Freedley initially operated the theater and owned it from 1930 to 1932. In the theater's early years, it hosted musicals such as Anything Goes, Lady in the Dark, and Something for the Boys, as well as plays. CBS took over in 1946 and continued to operate the theater until 1959, when Max and Stanley Stahl bought it. The Alvin was further sold in 1967 to Rock-Time Inc. and in 1975 to the Nederlanders. Through the 1960s and 1970s, the Alvin hosted long runs of shows such as A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, High Spirits, The Great White Hope, Company, Shenandoah, and Annie. After the theater was renamed for Neil Simon, it hosted several of his plays during the 1980s and 1990s, as well as the musical Hairspray during much of the 2000s.

Site[edit]

The Neil Simon Theatre is on 250 West 52nd Street, on the south sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Broadway, in the Midtown Manhattan neighborhood of New York City.[3][4] The rectangular land lot covers 12,350 sq ft (1,147 m2), with a frontage of 123.50 ft (37.64 m) on 52nd Street and a depth of 100 ft (30 m).[4][5] The Simon shares the block with the Mark Hellinger Theatre and Gallagher's Steakhouse to the east. Other nearby buildings include the August Wilson Theatre to the north; the Broadway Theatre and 810 Seventh Avenue to the northeast; Axa Equitable Center to the east; the Winter Garden Theatre to the southeast; and Paramount Plaza (including Circle in the Square Theatre and the Gershwin Theatre) to the south.[4]

Design[edit]

The Neil Simon Theatre, originally the Alvin Theatre, was designed by Herbert J. Krapp and was constructed in 1927. The exterior is designed in the neo-Georgian style,[3][6] while the interior is designed in the Adam style typical of most of Krapp's designs.[7]

Facade[edit]

Main entrance doors

The facade consists of two sections, which are connected to each other. The five-story-tall eastern section is wider and is symmetrical, containing the auditorium entrance. The western section, which contains the stage house, is six stories high.[8][9] On the upper stories, the facade is made of red brick in English bond, with terracotta trim.[10][11] The Simon is one of a few Broadway theaters with a neo-Georgian facade, along with the Belasco Theatre, Hayes Theater, and Stephen Sondheim Theatre. This was done to create the impression that theater-goers were "entering the producer's home".[6] When the Alvin was built, one critic said the exterior design had "an appearance in keeping with the dignity of its neighbor" across the street, now the Wilson.[12]

Base[edit]

In both sections, the base is made of rusticated blocks of terracotta, designed to resemble marble. On the eastern side of the ground-floor facade is a pair of recessed metal doors. The center of the auditorium facade contains two sets of metal-and-glass doors. Six doors to the east connect with the inner lobby, while eight doors to the west connect with the box office lobby; there is a modern marquee above these doors. In the stage-house section of the facade, there are several recessed doorways, including a stage door. A horizontal frieze with panels and vertical grooves runs above the base.[9][8]

Upper stories[edit]

Upper stories (east to west)
Eastern (left) pavilion of auditorium
Central section of auditorium
Stage house

Above the base, vertical terracotta bands and quoins divide the auditorium facade into three sections. The central section has three vertical bays of windows. Each bay contains a double-height arched window at the second story, with terracotta imposts and keystones near the top of each arch. On the fourth story, each of the three central bays has a rectangular window with a terracotta frame, above which is a broken pediment with scrolls flanking an urn. The fifth-story windows also have rectangular terracotta frames; their sills are connected by a terracotta band course. A triangular gable rises above these windows; there is a terracotta oculus at the center of the gable, surrounded by wreaths and floral decorations.[9][13]

The outer sections of the auditorium facade are designed as pavilions, which are almost identical to each other except at the top. Both pavilions are flanked by fluted terracotta pilasters, which rest on the frieze that runs above the base. Between these pilasters are double-height niches at the second story, each surrounded by terracotta imposts and keystones. The niches contain terracotta urns, placed above seashell motifs. Above each niche, the fourth story contains two windows with rectangular terracotta frames. Each pair of pilasters supports a terracotta entablature and pediment on the fifth floor, as well as a cornice above that story. Whereas the eastern (left) pavilion is capped by a parapet, the western (right) pavilion rises for another story, the same height as the stage house.[13][14]

The stage house is to the right of the auditorium. Vertical terracotta bands and quoins split the stage house into sections with one, three, and one bays from left to right. The windows of the stage house are rectangular, with terracotta lintels above each window. The center bays of the stage house also have terracotta panels above the third and fourth floors. There is a cornice and paneling above the fifth floor, as well as a parapet with a balustrade above the sixth floor. The leftmost bay of the stage house, nearest the auditorium, rises to a seventh story. The stage house's rightmost bay has a vertical sign with the theater's name.[13][14]

Interior[edit]

Lobbies[edit]

The rectangular ticket lobby is directly inside the main entrance[15] and has dark marble walls.[12][16][17] The western (right) wall has ticket windows, while the eastern (left) wall has a recessed niche to the inner lobby, containing a glass-and-bronze double door flanked by small sconces. The eight glass-and-bronze doors on the north wall lead from the street, with panels above them, while the south wall contains paneled wooden doors to the auditorium's orchestra level. A cornice surrounds the ceiling. which is decorated with plasterwork in the Adam style. The middle of the ceiling has a pair of crystal lamps.[15]

Decorative detail of the inner lobby

The inner lobby is rectangular in plan. It is accessed by the niche on its western wall, which leads from the ticket lobby, as well as from the six glass-and-bronze doors on the north wall, which lead from the street. The south wall contains paneled wooden doors to the auditorium, while the east wall contains a staircase to the mezzanine lounge. The inner lobby's ceiling is decorated with plasterwork in the Adam style and contains a pair of crystal chandeliers.[15]

When the Alvin was built, the mezzanine lounge was designed as an English lounge measuring 100 by 35 ft (30 by 11 m).[12][16] The mezzanine lounge's walls are wainscoted and contain lighting sconces.[18] The space also originally contained a fireplace. Four "retiring rooms" led off the lounge, which included men's and women's smoking rooms.[16] The lounge's ceiling has an oval dome with plasterwork decorations; a central chandelier; and a cornice, which intersects with the dome. From the mezzanine lounge, staircases lead down to the north, connecting with the inner lobby, and south, connecting with the orchestra. There are rectangular coffers above either staircase, with crystal chandeliers and surrounding cornices. The southern staircase has a metal railing.[18] These staircases were placed in the lounge, rather than within the auditorium itself, to minimize disruption from latecomers.[19]

Auditorium[edit]

The auditorium has an orchestra level, one balcony, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch.[15] The auditorium space is designed with plaster decorations and is nearly square in plan.[11][15] According to the Nederlander Organization, the auditorium has 1,445 seats;[20] meanwhile, The Broadway League cites a capacity of 1,467 seats[21] and Playbill cites 1,380 seats.[22] The theater originally had a capacity of 1,400 seats, with 702 in the orchestra, 674 in the balcony, and 24 in the boxes.[12][16] An article from 1967 described the theater as having 1,363 seats for musicals and 1.334 seats for plays.[23] The auditorium initially had a color scheme of ivory, blue, gray, and gold,[12][16][19] with lavender or mulberry draperies.[11][16] White paint covers many of the original interior decorations.[11] Above the auditorium were three stories of offices.[19]

Seating areas[edit]

The orchestra level is raked, sloping down toward an orchestra pit in front of the stage.[24] The rear of the orchestra contains a promenade with a paneled wall to the east, with sconces. The rear of the orchestra has a standing rail made of marble, separating the promenade from the rear rows of seats. The promenade and the orchestra seating are separated by two columns, designed to resemble marble pillars; they are topped by Doric-style capitals.[18] The south (left) wall of the orchestra has metal doorways, alternating with paneled wall sections that contain sconces. The north (right) wall has two sets of paneled wooden doors, separated by a panel with a sconce; the doors in the rear lead to the inner lobby, while those in the front lead to the ticket lobby. The exit signs above each door are flanked by friezes that depict lyres and griffins.[24]

The balcony level is divided into front and rear sections by an aisle halfway across its depth, which in turn is delineated by a metal railing. The crossover aisle connects to exit doors on both of the side walls, which in turn are topped by friezes with lyres and griffins. Exit doors with similar friezes are also placed on the side walls next to the front balcony. The rest of the balcony's side walls are divided into sections by pilasters with Ionic capitals, which support an entablature around the auditorium. Each side-wall section contains crystal-and-brass lighting sconces. The front rail of the balcony contains swags, urns, and cameo patterns, which have been partly covered over with light boxes. The underside of the balcony has Adam-style panels with crystal light fixtures. The balcony's rear wall is divided into panels that contain lighting sconces. There are some air-conditioning vents on the walls.[18]

On either side of the stage is a wall section with three boxes at the balcony level. The boxes step downward toward the stage; the front box curves forward into the proscenium arch, while the rear box curves backward into the balcony.[11][15] At the orchestra level, there is an opening on either wall, corresponding to the locations of the boxes above. The undersides of the boxes include crystal lamps and console brackets, while the front railings of the boxes contain swags, urns, and cameo patterns. Paneled piers separate the boxes from each other, supporting a smaller entablature directly above the boxes; each small entablature has a broken pediment with scrolls flanking an urn. Above the pediment, there are colonettes with female grotesques, which extend upward to the entablature that surrounds the auditorium.[15]

Other design features[edit]

Next to the boxes is a flat proscenium arch, which consists of fluted Ionic pilasters on either side of the opening, as well as an entablature above. The entablature contains an Adam-style frieze. Above the arch is a lunette panel with a mural, which shows a pastoral scene with mythological characters.[15] When the theater was built, the proscenium opening was described as measuring 40 ft (12 m) wide.[12][16] Behind the opening, the stage was 100 feet wide and 35 feet deep, with a gridiron 68 ft (21 m) tall.[12] The orchestra pit in front of the stage could fit 48 people.[16][17] Backstage were 20 dressing rooms capable of accommodating 150 performers, as well as a pair of chorus "rest rooms" and a rehearsal room.[12][16]

The ceiling contains groin vaults on the side walls, separated by ribs with plasterwork decorations. At the front of the auditorium is a recessed circular dome encircled by ornamental bands, with a crystal chandelier hanging from a central medallion. Behind the dome, the ceiling is divided into panels with Adam-style plasterwork decorations. Above the rear balcony is a half-dome with ornamental bands and technical-booth openings. Air-conditioning vents are placed in the ceiling.[18]

History[edit]

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[25][26] The Alvin Theatre was one of the later theaters to be built before the Depression.[27] The theater's name was an amalgamation of the first names of its original operators:[6][28] Alex A. Aarons (1891–1943[29]) and Vinton Freedley (1891–1969[30]). Both men hailed from Philadelphia.[27][31] Aarons was a producer of musical comedies, while Freedley was "the only Broadway producer whose name was listed in the social register".[27] The men had formed a partnership in 1923[30] or 1924,[32] but they only worked together until 1933.[30][32] Since 1983,[20][33] it has been named for Neil Simon (1927–2018), one of Broadway's most prolific playwrights.[34] The Simon is operated by the Nederlander Organization.[21][22]

Development and early years[edit]

View from the west

In January 1927, Alexander Pincus and M. L. Goldstone bought the sites at 244–254 West 52nd Street from the Lebanon Estates Corporation, with plans to develop a legitimate theater on the site.[35][36] Pincus had previously developed the Longacre and Imperial theaters;[37] he and Goldstone planned to fund the theater's $1.4 million cost.[38][39] The same month, Pincus submitted plans to the New York City Department of Buildings for a theater at the site, designed by Herbert J. Krapp.[40] Pincus and Goldstone awarded a general contract for the theater's construction to the O'Day Construction Company that March.[5][38] By October 1927, Aarons and Freedley had leased the theater and planned to stage George and Ira Gershwin's musical Funny Face, starring Fred and Adele Astaire.[31][41] The Alvin opened on November 22, 1927, with Funny Face;[42][43] that show ran for 250 performances.[44][45] Brooks Atkinson, the theater critic for The New York Times, wrote: "If Funny Face had been less engrossing, the audience might have had more time to appreciate the new theatre."[7][43]

View of niche (left) and stage house (right)

The Alvin's first few musicals had relatively short runs.[46] In 1928, the theater hosted the Gershwin musical Treasure Girl with Gertrude Lawrence.[46][47] Though the musical charged a top admission of $6, then an unprecedented price,[48] it managed 69 performances before it closed.[49][50] Next was the Theatre Guild's production of Wings Over Europe, which relocated from the Martin Beck Theatre.[17] Aarons and Freedley received a $570,000 mortgage loan on the theater in January 1929.[51][52] The Rodgers and Hart musical Spring Is Here opened at the Alvin that March[53][54] and had 104 performances.[55][56] Another Rodgers and Hart musical, Heads Up!, opened at the Alvin that November[57] for a 144-performance run.[55][58] In 1930, Ethel Merman made her Broadway debut in the Gershwins' Girl Crazy,[59] which had 272 performances.[55][60] Aarons and Freedley bought the Alvin and the land underneath it that April.[61][62]

Pincus and Goldstone operation[edit]

A Flag is Born at the Alvin in 1946

Pincus and Goldstone took over the Alvin's operations in May 1932 for unknown reasons.[63][64] That year, the theater hosted a transfer of Eugene O'Neill's play Mourning Becomes Electra, as well as Jerome Kern's musical Music in the Air.[55] The Players brought their production of Uncle Tom's Cabin to the Alvin in May 1933;[65][66] the play was so popular that it was extended two weeks past its original one-week run.[67][68] The same year saw the opening of the Maxwell Anderson play Mary of Scotland with Helen Hayes.[69][70][71] Freedley next produced Cole Porter's musical Anything Goes at the Alvin in 1934, featuring Merman, William Gaxton, Victor Moore, and Vivian Vance;[69][72] it ran for 420 performances.[73][74]

By the mid-1930s, the Alvin Theatre and the neighboring Guild (now August Wilson) Theatre were the northernmost venues in the Theater District that still hosted legitimate shows.[75] The original production of the Gershwins' American folk opera Porgy and Bess opened at the Alvin in October 1935.[76][77] While Porgy and Bess closed at the Alvin after 124 performances,[73][78][79] its revivals proved more successful.[67] This was followed in October 1936 by Porter's Red, Hot and Blue with Merman and Jimmy Durante,[69][80] which lasted 181 performances.[73][81] The Alvin hosted two musicals by Rodgers and Hart in the late 1930s.[82] I'd Rather Be Right opened with George M. Cohan in 1937,[83] running for 289 performances,[84][85] and The Boys from Syracuse opened in 1938,[86] lasting 235 performances.[87][85]

The Alvin's first production of the 1940s was a limited run of The Taming of the Shrew in February 1940, staged by acting couple Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne for the Finnish Relief Fund.[88][89] That April, Lunt and Fontanne appeared in Robert E. Sherwood's play There Shall Be No Night,[90][91] which ran for several months with a tour in mid-1940.[92] The next year, the Alvin hosted Ira Gershwin, Moss Hart, and Kurt Weill's psychiatry-themed musical Lady in the Dark;[93][94] featuring Gertrude Lawrence, it had 467 performances.[95][96][97] The Alvin hosted Porter's musical Something for the Boys with Ethel Merman in January 1943,[98][99] appearing for 422 performances.[95][100] Something for the Boys closed to make way for the musical Jackpot,[101][102] which ran 67 performances.[103][104] The Alvin's productions in 1944 and 1945 were mostly quick failures, including Helen Goes to Troy, The Firebrand of Florence, and Hollywood Pinafore.[105] More successful was Betty Comden, Adolph Green, and Morton Gould's musical Billion Dollar Baby, which opened at the end of 1945[106][107] and lasted for 200 performances.[95][108][109]

CBS ownership, Cullman operation[edit]

Attic

By December 1945, broadcast network CBS was negotiating to buy the Alvin for use as a studio, as CBS's lease at the nearby Hammerstein's Theatre was about to expire.[110][111] Howard S. Cullman, who owned Hammerstein's, intended to return that theater to legitimate use.[112][113] CBS bought the Alvin for $825,000 in February 1946.[114][115][116] That June, CBS agreed to lease Hammerstein's from Cullman for five more years, while Cullman agreeed to lease the Alvin from CBS and present productions there instead.[109][117] The same year, the Alvin hosted Joan of Lorraine with Ingrid Bergman, Sam Wanamaker, and Romney Brent.[118][119] This was followed in 1947 by the play Life with Father, which transferred from another theater to conclude its 3,224-performance run.[120][121] George Bernard Shaw's play Man and Superman opened at the Alvin that October[122][123] and relocated in February 1948.[124][125] It was followed immediately afterward by Thomas Heggen and Joshua Logan's comedy Mister Roberts with Henry Fonda,[126] which ran for 1,157 performances.[121][127]

Cullman and CBS decided in 1951 to swap Hammerstein's and the Alvin for another three years, allowing the former to be used as a studio and the latter to be used for legitimate plays.[128][129] Three shows opened at the Alvin that year: the Sidney Kingsley play Darkness at Noon,[121][130][131] the musical A Tree Grows in Brooklyn,[132][133][134] and the Paul Osborn play Point of No Return.[135][136][137] Point of No Return was followed in December 1952 by the revue Two's Company, with Bette Davis in her first Broadway appearance in 22 years,[138][139] but it only lasted about 90 performances.[140][141] The next year, Norman Krasna's comedy Kind Sir opened at the Alvin with Mary Martin and Charles Boyer.[135][142][143]

The musical The Golden Apple transferred to the Alvin from off-Broadway in April 1954,[144] running for 173 total performances.[140][145] The Harold Arlen and Truman Capote musical House of Flowers was booked before Cullman's lease came up for renewal that year, indicating that the leases of the Alvin and Hammerstein's would again be swapped.[146][147] House of Flowers ultimately opened in December 1954[148][149] and ran for 165 performances.[150][151] Ira Levin's musical No Time for Sergeants opened the next year,[152][153] running for 796 performances over two years.[150][154] The theater hosted several moderately successful productions in the late 1950s, including the musicals Oh, Captain! in 1958[150][155][156] and First Impressions in 1959.[157][158][159] In addition, Jerome Robbins choreographed his dance special Ballet U.S.A. in 1958,[160][161] and the musical Bells Are Ringing relocated from the Shubert to the Alvin that year.[157][162]

Stahl and Rock-Time ownership[edit]

CBS sold the Alvin in 1959 to Max and Stanley Stahl, who also owned the neighboring Hellinger Theatre.[163][164] The Stahls quickly hired a new manager for the Alvin.[165] In 1960, the theater hosted the musical Greenwillow,[157][166][167] the dance troupe Les Ballets Africains,[168][169] and a transfer of the musical West Side Story from the Winter Garden.[157][170] The Carolyn Leigh and Cy Coleman musical Wildcat opened that December with Lucille Ball,[171][172] who made her only Broadway appearance there.[173] The musical Irma La Douce transferred from the Plymouth to the Alvin in 1961.[157][174][175] The next year, Stephen Sondheim, Burt Shevelove, and Larry Gelbart's musical A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum opened,[176][177] running for 967 performances.[178][179] During A Funny Thing's run in October 1962, Lester Osterman (owner of the 46th Street and O'Neill theaters) leased the Alvin for five years.[180]

Hugh Martin and Timothy Gray's musical comedy High Spirits, with Beatrice Lillie and Tammy Grimes, opened in 1964[181][182] and ran for 367 performances.[178][183] Maurice Chevalier appeared at the Alvin in April 1965 for a month-long solo show, Maurice Chevalier at 77.[178][184][185] This was followed the next month by Flora the Red Menace,[186][187] in which Liza Minnelli made her Broadway debut.[176] Flora the Red Menace and the next several shows had comparatively short runs.[188] These shows included the musicals The Yearling (1965),[189][190] It's a Bird... It's a Plane... It's Superman (1966),[191][192] Dinner At Eight (1966),[193][194] and Sherry! (1967).[195][196] Rockefeller Center's development subsidiary Rock-Time Inc. bought the Alvin from Osterman in July 1967 through its agent, Konrad Matthaei. In exchange, Rock-Time sold the Playhouse Theatre near Rockefeller Center, which was to be demolished.[23]

The Tom Stoppard play Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead opened at the Alvin in October 1967,[197][198] running for 421 total performances across two theaters.[199][200] It was succeeded in 1968 by Howard Sackler's drama The Great White Hope with James Earl Jones and Jane Alexander,[201][202] which had 557 performances.[199][203] The Alvin next hosted the original production of the Stephen Sondheim/George Furth musical Company, which premiered in 1970[201][204] and ran just over 700 performances during the next two years.[205][206] A couple of short runs followed, including Molly (1973) and The Freedom of the City (1974).[21][207] The Alvin's next success was the musical Shenandoah, which opened in 1975[197][208] and stayed two years before transferring.[209] By July 1974, Matthaei had defaulted on the theater's mortgage loan, and the Bowery Savings Bank acquired the Alvin in foreclosure. The theater was then placed for sale at $1.2 million.[210]

Nederlander ownership[edit]

1970s and 1980s[edit]

Vertical sign

The Nederlander Organization acquired the Alvin in 1975, and the venue became the family's fourth Broadway theater after the Palace, Uris, and Atkinson.[211][212] The sale involved $100,000 in cash and a $1.16 million mortgage loan.[211] The original Broadway production of Annie opened in 1977[213][214] and ran for five years before transferring.[215] The next five musicals in 1981 and 1982 were short runs.[21][216] The Little Prince and the Aviator closed during previews,[217][218] while Merrily We Roll Along, Little Johnny Jones, Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?, and Seven Brides for Seven Brothers each closed after less than two weeks.[21] The producers of The Little Prince, as well as those of Little Johnny Jones (which closed on opening night), successfully sued the Nederlanders in 1986, on the grounds that the company had unfairly evicted both shows.[219] The Alvin's next non-flop was Your Arms Too Short to Box with God with Al Green and Patti LaBelle, which opened in September 1982.[220][221]

Brighton Beach Memoirs, the first play in Neil Simon's Eugene trilogy, opened at the Alvin in March 1983.[222] The Nederlanders renamed the theater for Simon shortly afterward on June 29, 1983.[223][224] The renaming was unrelated to Brighton Beach Memoirs; the Nederlanders had offered to rename the theater after Simon in 1982, but the playwright had declined at the time.[224] Neil Simon was the second playwright to have a Broadway theater named for him, after the late Eugene O'Neill, and the first living playwright so honored.[223] Members of the theatrical community expressed that the Alvin should have been renamed for the Gershwins; that name had been applied to the Uris Theatre.[225] Jerry Weintraub then purchased a stake in the operation of the Neil Simon Theatre in 1984.[226][227] Concurrently, the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started to consider protecting the Simon as a landmark in 1982,[228] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[229] The LPC designated the facades of the Simon, Ambassador, and Virginia (now August Wilson) theaters as landmarks in August 1985, along with the Ambassador's and Simon's interiors,[230][231] over the objections of the three theaters' owners.[232][233] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the landmark designations in December 1985.[234]

Brighton Beach Memoirs was followed by another play in the Eugene trilogy, Biloxi Blues, in 1985.[235][236] The next year, the musical Into the Light opened at the Simon, closing after six performances.[237][238] Noël Coward's play Blithe Spirit opened at the Simon in March 1987;[239][240] the theater also hosted a tribute to one of the play's stars, Geraldine Page, who died mid-run.[241] Comedian Mort Sahl made a limited appearance that October,[242][243] and the play Breaking the Code opened the next month.[244][245] The Simon hosted revivals of two O'Neill plays in June 1988, Long Day's Journey into Night and Ah, Wilderness! (both with Colleen Dewhurst and Jason Robards), as part of the First New York International Festival of the Arts.[246] Later that year, Kenny Loggins played some concerts at the Simon.[247][248] Two musicals were announced for the Simon in early 1989; Senator Joe closed during previews, and The Tower of Babel did not even have previews.[246] The Tennessee Williams play Orpheus Descending was then presented at the Simon in September 1989.[249][250] Around that time, the LPC had held a hearing on whether a hotel developed by Silverstein Properties could be cantilevered over the Simon.[251][252]

1990s and 2000s[edit]

A dance troupe of Don Cossacks from Russia had a limited engagement at the Simon in January 1990,[246][253] That October, comedian Jackie Mason launched his solo series Brand New,[254][255] which ran for eight months.[256] Another Neil Simon play opened at his namesake theater in March 1992, Jake's Women,[257][258][259] which had 245 performances amid mixed reception.[256] The next November, the Dutch production Cyrano: The Musical opened at the Simon,[260][261] lasting 137 performances.[256] The hit West End musical The Rise and Fall of Little Voice opened at the Simon in May 1994,[262][263] only to close after one week.[264][265] This was followed by concerts from musicians Basia in November 1994[266][267] and Laurie Anderson in May 1995,[268][269] as well as a limited performance by Danny Gans in November 1995.[270][271] The Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The King and I was revived in 1996.[272][273][274] The King and I closed in early 1998 to make way for the Arthur Miller play A View from the Bridge,[275] which lasted through August 1998.[276][277] The Simon hosted the dance special Swan Lake in late 1998,[278][279] as well as a concert by Natalie Merchant[280][281] and a revised version of the musical The Scarlet Pimpernel in 1999.[282][283]

A revival of the musical The Music Man opened at the Simon in early 2000,[284][285] lasting until the end of 2001.[286][287] During The Music Man's run, the comedian Mandy Patinkin launched a U.S. tour on September 10, 2001, with a concert at the Simon.[288] Elaine Stritch's one-woman show Elaine Stritch at Liberty then premiered at the Simon in February 2002.[289][290] After the closure of Elaine Stritch at Liberty, the Simon was expanded from 1,328 seats to a potential 1,467 in preparation for its next engagement: the musical Hairspray,[291] which opened in August 2002.[292][293] Hairspray set the house record for the theater, closing at the beginning of 2009.[294][295] Robin Williams was to perform his comedy tour Weapons Of Self-Destruction at the Simon in April 2009, but he canceled his engagement after undergoing surgery.[296][297] A revival of Ragtime was booked instead,[298] opening in November 2009.[299][300] Ragtime failed to repeat the success it had enjoyed at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., closing in January 2010 after 57 performances.[301][302]

2010s to present[edit]

Marquee for the revival of Jesus Christ Superstar (2012)

Musician Harry Connick Jr. had a limited performance at the Simon in July 2010;[303][304] his appearance was recorded for the 2011 album In Concert on Broadway.[305] The concert Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles opened at the Simon that October,[306][307] relocating to the Atkinson at the beginning of 2011.[308] The musical Catch Me if You Can opened in April 2011,[309][310] running for 170 performances.[311] A revival of Jesus Christ Superstar ran at the Simon from March to July 2012,[312][313] followed at the end of that year by the short-lived musical Scandalous.[314][315] The Andrew Lippa musical Big Fish was then booked for the Simon in early 2013, but the theater stood dark for most of that year because Big Fish was performing elsewhere.[316] Big Fish only ran from October to December 2013.[317][318] This was followed by two similarly short runs: Robert Schenkkan's play All the Way from March to June 2014,[319][320] and Sting's musical The Last Ship from October 2014 to January 2015.[321][322]

A revival of Frederick Loewe and Alan Jay Lerner's musical Gigi opened at the Simon in April 2015, only for the show to close after two months.[323][324] In July 2015, the Nederlanders sold 20,000 sq ft (1,900 m2) of the unused air rights above the Simon for $8.9 million. The buyers were a development consortium erecting a hotel several blocks away.[325][326][a] At the end of that year, The Illusionists performed a magic show at the Simon for a limited run.[328][329] A revival of Andrew Lloyd Webber's hit musical Cats opened at the Simon in August 2016 and ran until the end of the next year.[330][331] Tony Kushner's play Angels in America then opened in March 2018 for a three-month run.[332][333] The musical The Cher Show opened that December and ran until August 2019,[334][335] and The Illusionists returned in late 2019 for their magic show, Magic of the Holidays.[336][337]

After The Cher Show closed, MJ the Musical had been booked at the Simon for mid-2020.[338] However, the Simon did not host another show for two years due to the COVID-19 pandemic in New York City. The theater reopened in December 2021 with previews of MJ the Musical,[339][340] which officially opened in February 2022.[341][342]

Notable productions[edit]

Alvin Theatre[edit]

Neil Simon Theatre[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ New York City zoning sets a maximum floor area for each land lot, after which developers must buy air rights to increase their floor area. Typically, building owners could only sell air rights to developers who owned adjacent sites. Broadway theater owners are allowed to sell their air rights to developers of any lot between Sixth and Eighth Avenues north of 40th Street, regardless of whether the land lots were contiguous.[327]
  2. ^ The Little Prince and the Aviator never officially opened at the Alvin Theatre; it only played previews.[217]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1985, p. 1.
  3. ^ a b White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 304. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
  4. ^ a b c "244 West 52 Street, 10019". New York City Department of City Planning. Retrieved March 25, 2021.
  5. ^ a b "Dr. Partos Will Replace 52d St. House With Trade". New York Herald Tribune. March 1, 1927. p. 37. ProQuest 1130385400.
  6. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 13.
  7. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1985, p. 13.
  8. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 14.
  9. ^ a b c Morrison 1999, p. 154.
  10. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, pp. 14–15.
  11. ^ a b c d e Morrison 1999, p. 155.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h Allen, Kelcey (November 18, 1927). "Amusements: Alvin, Newest Theatre On Broadway, Opens On Tuesday Evening". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 35, no. 119. p. 5. ProQuest 1653945612.
  13. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 15.
  14. ^ a b Morrison 1999, pp. 154–155.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1985, p. 15.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i "New Alvin Playhouse Opens Tuesday Night: 'Fanny Face' the Initial Attraction of Theater Dedicated to Musical Comedy". New York Herald Tribune. November 20, 1927. p. E12. ProQuest 1113651866.
  17. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 267.
  18. ^ a b c d e Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1985, p. 16.
  19. ^ a b c "New Theatre on 52d St: the Alvin, Nearing Completion, Will Seat 1,400". The New York Times. November 20, 1927. p. RE2. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 104014083.
  20. ^ a b "Neil Simon Theatre". Nederlander Organization. Retrieved December 10, 2021.
  21. ^ a b c d e The Broadway League (October 3, 2021). "Neil Simon Theatre – New York, NY". IBDB. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  22. ^ a b "Neil Simon Theatre". Playbill. February 13, 2020. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  23. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (July 4, 1967). "The Alvin Is Sold to Rock-Time Inc.; Deal for Theater Figures in Redevelopment Plan". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  24. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission Interior 1985, pp. 15–16.
  25. ^ Swift, Christopher (2018). "The City Performs: An Architectural History of NYC Theater". New York City College of Technology, City University of New York. Archived from the original on March 25, 2020. Retrieved March 25, 2020.
  26. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 4.
  27. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 7.
  28. ^ "Alvin Theater Observes Its 20th Birthday". New York Herald Tribune. November 23, 1947. p. C5. ProQuest 1270011716.
  29. ^ "Alex A. Aarons, 52, Theatrical Producer". The New York Times. March 16, 1943. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  30. ^ a b c "Vinton Freedley, Producer, Dead; Offered 'Anything Goes' and 'Girl Crazy'Led ANTA". The New York Times. June 6, 1969. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  31. ^ a b "The Call Boy's Chat". The Philadelphia Inquirer. October 16, 1927. p. 71. Retrieved February 28, 2022 – via newspapers.com.
  32. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 8.
  33. ^ Johnston, Laurie; Anderson, Susan Heller (June 30, 1983). "New York Day by Day". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  34. ^ Isherwood, Charles (August 26, 2018). "Neil Simon, Broadway Master of Comedy, Is Dead at 91". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  35. ^ "Real Estate Notes: Buyers Plan 1,500-seat Theatre for West. Fifty-second Street Plot". The New York Times. January 19, 1927. p. 39. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 104239522.
  36. ^ "12 Flatbush Houses Sold". New York Herald Tribune. January 19, 1927. p. 31. ProQuest 1113685630.
  37. ^ "Two Americans Who Prefer London -- Miss Lillie Goes Abroad -- Success for Miss Le Gallienne -- Varied Items". The New York Times. June 12, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  38. ^ a b "New Theater Plans and Activities". The Billboard. Vol. 39, no. 11. March 12, 1927. p. 46. ProQuest 1031816846.
  39. ^ "Times Square: L. and A. Pincus". Variety. Vol. 86, no. 8. March 9, 1927. p. 33. ProQuest 1475697107.
  40. ^ "Plans for 52d Street Theatre". The New York Times. January 22, 1927. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  41. ^ "Theater News: Judith Anderson to Appear in New George Kelly Play; Guild Troupers Depart". New York Herald Tribune. October 10, 1927. p. 13. ProQuest 1113577773.
  42. ^ Hammond, Percy (November 23, 1927). "The Theaters: the Astaires and Others in "Funny Face," a First-class Symbol at the New Alvin Theater Adele Astaire". New York Herald Tribune. p. 14. ProQuest 1133777680.
  43. ^ a b Atkinson, J. Brooks (November 23, 1927). "Astaires and Others". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  44. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 279; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 13.
  45. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 22, 1927). "Funny Face – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Funny Face (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1927)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  46. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 184; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 267; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 18.
  47. ^ "Gertrude Lawrence in 'Treasure Girl'". The New York Times. October 5, 1928. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  48. ^ Kaplan, Morris (November 19, 1977). "Alvin Theater to Mark 50th Year As Playhouse for Musical Comedy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  49. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 267; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 18.
  50. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 8, 1928). "Treasure Girl – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Treasure Girl (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1928)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  51. ^ "Realty Finacing; Alvin Theatre Mortgaged for $570,000-Other Loans". The New York Times. January 23, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  52. ^ "$570,000 Advanced On Alvin Theater In Fifty-second St.: $400,000 Loaned on New Building Project on Bronx River Road Corner". New York Herald Tribune. January 23, 1929. p. 41. ProQuest 1111696431.
  53. ^ Ruhl, Arthur (March 12, 1929). "Spring Is Here' a Musical Way--To Take Care of Glenn Hunter: Star of 'Seventeen' Has Difficulty in New Scenes, but Davis Hokum Helps Glenn Hanter". New York Herald Tribune. p. 22. ProQuest 1111951174.
  54. ^ Atkinson, J. Brooks (March 12, 1929). "THE PLAY". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  55. ^ a b c d Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 268; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 18.
  56. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 11, 1929). "Spring is Here – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Spring Is Here (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  57. ^ "Theatrical Notes". The New York Times. November 1, 1929. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  58. ^ The Broadway League (November 11, 1929). "Heads Up – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
    "Heads Up (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1929)". Playbill. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  59. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 185; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 268; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 13.
  60. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 14, 1930). "Girl Crazy – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Girl Crazy (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1930)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  61. ^ "Comedy by Newspaper Writers, 'Let's Pretend,' to Get Tryout". New York Herald Tribune. April 9, 1930. p. 22. ProQuest 1113161655.
  62. ^ "Aarons and Freedley Buy Alvin Theatre; Purchase Ground Also From Pincus and Goldstone, Who Built Playhouse for Them". The New York Times. April 9, 1930. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  63. ^ "Builders Take Over the Alvin Theatre; Control of West 52d Street Play- house Passes From Aarons and Freedley". The New York Times. May 16, 1932. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  64. ^ "Alvin Reverts to Its Owners". New York Daily News. May 16, 1932. p. 334. Retrieved February 28, 2022 – via newspapers.com.
  65. ^ "Alvin Gets "Uncle Tom's Cabin."". The New York Times. May 10, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  66. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 29, 1933). "Uncle Tom's Cabin – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Uncle Tom's Cabin (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1933)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  67. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 269.
  68. ^ "Uncle Tom to Stay; Will Continue Its Run at Alvin Theatre Two Additional Weeks". The New York Times. June 8, 1933. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  69. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 185; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 269; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 13.
  70. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 27, 1933). "Mary of Scotland – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Mary of Scotland (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1933)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  71. ^ Atkinson.l.n, Brooks (November 28, 1933). "Helen Hayes and Philip Merivale in 'Mary of Scotland' -- Opening of 'The Scorpion.'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  72. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 22, 1934). "' Anything Goes' as Long as Victor Moore, Ethel Merman and William Gaxton Are Present". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  73. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 269; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 19.
  74. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 21, 1934). "Anything Goes – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Anything Goes (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1934)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  75. ^ "Legitimate: Only 35 Theatres Left for Legit; 17 Houses Switched Their Policies During Past Season; Once Were 60". Variety. Vol. 114, no. 7. May 1, 1934. p. 47. ProQuest 1475821537.
  76. ^ "News of the Stage; Gershwin's Folk Opera, 'Porgy and Bess', Opens Tonight -- Cooper-Merivale Repertory-to Close". The New York Times. October 10, 1935. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  77. ^ Mantle, Burns (October 12, 1935). "'Porgy and Bess' Stirs Audience". New York Daily News. p. 225. Retrieved February 28, 2022 – via newspapers.com.
  78. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 10, 1935). "Porgy and Bess – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Porgy and Bess (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1935)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  79. ^ "News of the Stage; ' Mid-West' Tonight at the Booth -- 'Porgy and Bess' Closing Jan. 18 -- Behrman Play Due Feb. 17". The New York Times. January 7, 1936. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  80. ^ Mantle, Burns (October 30, 1936). "'Red, Hot and Blue' at the Alvin". New York Daily News. p. 852. Retrieved February 28, 2022 – via newspapers.com.
  81. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 29, 1936). "Red, Hot and Blue – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Red, Hot and Blue (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1936)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  82. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 185; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 269–270; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 19.
  83. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 3, 1937). "THE PLAY; George M. Cohan as the United States President in 'I'd Rather Be Right'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  84. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 2, 1937). "I'd Rather Be Right – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "I'd Rather Be Right (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1937)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  85. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 270; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 19.
  86. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 24, 1938). "THE PLAY in Review; George Abbott's 'The Boys From Syracuse' Opens With Music and Lyrics by Rodgers and Hart and Clowning by Jimmy Savo". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  87. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 23, 1938). "The Boys from Syracuse – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Boys from Syracuse (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1938)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  88. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 270.
  89. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 6, 1940). "THE PLAY; Lunt's and Fontanne's 'Taming of the Shrew' Comes Back for the Finnish Relief Fund". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  90. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 29, 1940). "There Shall Be No Night – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "There Shall Be No Night (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  91. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (April 30, 1940). "The Play in Review; Robert E. Sherwood's 'There Shall Be No Night' Brings Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne Back to Town in a Drama About Finland's Resistance". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  92. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 185; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 270–271.
  93. ^ "Lady in the Dark' Is Closing May 30; Gertrude Lawrence Vehicle Is Scheduled to Halt at Alvin After 460 Performances". The New York Times. April 28, 1942. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  94. ^ "News of the Theater: "Lady in the Dark" Opens". New York Herald Tribune. January 23, 1942. p. 12. ProQuest 1320039747.
  95. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 271; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 20.
  96. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 23, 1941). "Lady in the Dark – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Lady in the Dark (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1941)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  97. ^ "News of the Stage; 'Lady in the Dark' to Have Premiere Tonight --Plymouth Gets 'The Doctor's Dilemma'". The New York Times. January 23, 1941. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  98. ^ "Todd Show Bows at Alvin Tonight; Musical, 'Something for the Boys,' Stars Ethel Merman -- 'Dark Eyes' Due Jan. 14". The New York Times. January 7, 1943. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  99. ^ "'Something for the Boys' to Open at the AIvin Tonight With Ethel Merman in Lead". New York Herald Tribune. January 7, 1943. p. 14. ProQuest 1267867409.
  100. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 7, 1943). "Something for the Boys – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Something for the Boys (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1943)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  101. ^ "'Something for the Boys' to Quit the Alvin to Let 'Jackpot' Have Theater Irene Worth". New York Herald Tribune. December 15, 1943. p. 21. ProQuest 1266869152.
  102. ^ Zolotow, Sam (December 15, 1943). "Alvin Is Booked for the 'Jackpot'; Freedley to Open Musical in Favorite Theatre on Jan. 13 -- 'Inn' Premiere Moved Up". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  103. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 13, 1944). "Jackpot – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Jackpot (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1944)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  104. ^ Zolotow, Sam (March 7, 1944). "Freedley Musical to Close Saturday; ' Jackpot' Will Depart After 67 Performances -- Belasco to House 'Mrs. January'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  105. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 270–271; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 20.
  106. ^ Zolotow, Sam (December 21, 1945). "Feigay-Smith Show Will Open Tonight; 'Billion Dollar Baby' to Arrive at the Alvin--Mitzi Green, Joan McCracken in Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  107. ^ McCord, Bert (December 21, 1945). "News of the Theater: Billion Dollar Baby". New York Herald Tribune. p. 17. ProQuest 1291247046.
  108. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 21, 1945). "Billion Dollar Baby – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Billion Dollar Baby (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1945)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  109. ^ a b Zolotow, Sam (June 27, 1946). "Feigay-Smith Show to Close Saturday; 'Billion Dollar Baby' Leaving Alvin After Run of 219-- CBS in Theatre Deal CBS Trades Theatres Stanton, Rubber Sponsors". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  110. ^ "CBS Is Negotiating for Alvin Theatre; Report Radio System Offers $850,000 for House--Jan. 5 'Strange Fruit' Finale Taylor Holmes in Play On and Off the Stage". The New York Times. December 29, 1945. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  111. ^ "Radio: CBS' 750G For Alvin Theatre, N.Y.". Variety. Vol. 161, no. 3. December 26, 1945. p. 25. ProQuest 1285882622.
  112. ^ McCord, Bert (December 28, 1945). "News of the Theater: Hammerstein a Theater Again". New York Herald Tribune. p. 19. ProQuest 1291127205.
  113. ^ Allen, Kelcey (December 31, 1945). "Amusement Notes: To Reopen as Legitimate Theatres". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 71, no. 127. p. 13. ProQuest 1627241953.
  114. ^ "Alvin Theater Acquired By Columbia System". New York Herald Tribune. February 17, 1946. p. C7. ProQuest 1325564713.
  115. ^ "Alvin Theatre Deal Concluded". The New York Times. February 16, 1946. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  116. ^ "CBS Pays $825,000 For Alvin Theatre In N.Y.". The Hollywood Reporter. Vol. 87, no. 22. February 18, 1946. p. 4. ProQuest 2320735040.
  117. ^ "Legitimate: 11 Mil. Last Season Near 15-Year High". The Billboard. Vol. 58, no. 28. July 13, 1946. p. 46. ProQuest 1040017637.
  118. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 185; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 272; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 14.
  119. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 19, 1946). "THE PLAY in Review". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  120. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 8, 1939). "Life With Father – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Life with Father (Broadway, Empire Theatre, 1939)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  121. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 272; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 21.
  122. ^ Zolotow, Sam (October 8, 1947). "Shaw Play Opens at Alvin Tonight; ' Man and Superman' Marking Return of Maurice Evans -- Frances Rowe in Cast". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  123. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 185; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 272; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 21.
  124. ^ Zolotow, Sam (November 28, 1947). "Evans Play Moves to Hudson Feb. 16; ' Man and Superman' Leaving Alvin for 'Mister Roberts,' Henry Fonda Vehicle". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 28, 2022.
  125. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 21.
  126. ^ Zolotow, Sam (February 18, 1948). "Fonda Wll Return to Stage Tonight; Film Actor Is Star of 'Mister' Roberts,' Bowing at Alvin With $300,000 in Till". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  127. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 18, 1948). "Mister Roberts – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Mister Roberts (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1948)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  128. ^ Zolotow, Sam (May 30, 1951). "Theatre Owners to Continue Deal; Cullman, Hayward Again Will Exchange Hammerstein Lease With C.B.S. for the Alvin". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 30, 2021.
  129. ^ "Legitimate: Alvin & Hammerstein Swap-Deal Drops 2 In Partnership Shuffle". Variety. Vol. 183, no. 13. June 6, 1951. p. 55. ProQuest 1401259569.
  130. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (January 21, 1951). "'Darkness at Noon'; Sidney Kingsley Makes a Drama From The Novel by Arthur Koestler". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  131. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 13, 1951). "Darkness at Noon – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Darkness at Noon (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  132. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 185; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 272; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 22.
  133. ^ Dash, Thomas R. (April 20, 1951). "Theatres: "A Tree Grows In Brooklyn": Alvin Theatre". Women's Wear Daily. Vol. 82, no. 78. p. 44. ProQuest 1522636836.
  134. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 19, 1951). "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "A Tree Grows in Brooklyn (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  135. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 186; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 272; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 22.
  136. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 14, 1951). "At the Theatre". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  137. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 13, 1951). "Point of No Return – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Point of No Return (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1951)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  138. ^ Shanley, J. P. (December 15, 1952). "Bette Davis Revue Is Opening Tonight; 'Two's Company' Bowing at Alvin After Revisions -- Star Last on Broadway in '30". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  139. ^ McCord, Bert (December 15, 1952). "News of the Theater: Bette Davis Opening Tonight". New York Herald Tribune. p. 22. ProQuest 1322293170.
  140. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 272; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 22.
  141. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 15, 1952). "Two's Company – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Two's Company (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1952)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  142. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 4, 1953). "Kind Sir – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Kind Sir (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1953)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  143. ^ Zolotow, Sam (November 4, 1953). "Kind Sir' Arrives at Alvin Tonight; Krasna Comedy to Star Mary Martin and Charles Boyer -- Logan Is Sole Sponsor". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  144. ^ McCord, Bert (April 20, 1954). "Theater News: 'Golden Apple' Is Moving Uptown to Alvin Tonight". New York Herald Tribune. p. 24. ProQuest 1322285959.
  145. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 20, 1954). "The Golden Apple – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Golden Apple (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1954)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  146. ^ Shanley, J. P. (March 22, 1954). "'New Faces' Is Set for a Return Run; Touring Revue Opens April 18 at St. James Theatre for a Limited Engagement". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  147. ^ McCord, Bert (July 30, 1954). "The Alvin Stays Legitimate, Books 'House of Flowers'". New York Herald Tribune. p. 10. ProQuest 1322543058.
  148. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (December 31, 1954). "Theatre: Truman Capote's Musical; Alvin Theatre Offers 'House of Flowers'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  149. ^ Kerr, Walter F. (December 31, 1954). "'House of Flowers'". New York Herald Tribune. p. 8. ProQuest 1323045084.
  150. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 273; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 22.
  151. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 30, 1954). "House of Flowers – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "House of Flowers (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1954)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  152. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (October 21, 1955). "Draftee Conquers Army; Alvin Premiere for 'No Time for Sergeants'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  153. ^ McCord, Bert (October 20, 1955). "'No Time for Sergeants' Opens Tonight at Alvin". New York Herald Tribune. p. 20. ProQuest 1326256493.
  154. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 20, 1955). "No Time for Sergeants – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "No Time for Sergeants (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1955)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  155. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 4, 1958). "Oh Captain! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Oh Captain! (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  156. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (February 5, 1958). "Theatre: 'Oh Captain!'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  157. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 273; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 23.
  158. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 19, 1959). "First Impressions – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "First Impressions (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1959)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  159. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 20, 1959). "The Theatre: 'First Impressions'; Austen Book Acted as Musical at Alvin". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  160. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 4, 1958). "Jerome Robbins' Ballet: U.S.A. – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Jerome Robbins' Ballet: U.S.A. (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1958)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  161. ^ Martin, John (September 14, 1958). "Dance: Robbins; Choreographer's New 'Ballets: U.S.A.' Home From Abroad -- Week's Events". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  162. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 29, 1956). "Bells Are Ringing – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Bells Are Ringing (Broadway, Sam S. Shubert Theatre, 1956)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  163. ^ "TV Trend Still West; CBS Sells NY House". The Hollywood Reporter. Vol. 156, no. 4. July 24, 1959. pp. 1, 15. ProQuest 2338313992.
  164. ^ "Stahls Purchase Alvin Theater". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. October 18, 1959. p. 23A. ProQuest 1632660704.
  165. ^ "Legitimate: Legit Bits". Variety. Vol. 216, no. 2. September 9, 1959. p. 57. ProQuest 1014808499.
  166. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 8, 1960). "Greenwillow – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Greenwillow (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1960)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  167. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (March 9, 1960). "Show Has Music and Lyrics by Loesser". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  168. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 26, 1960). "Les Ballets Africains – Broadway Special – 1960 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Les Ballets Africains (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1960)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  169. ^ "Ballets Africains to Open". The New York Times. September 26, 1960. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  170. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 1960). "West Side Story – Broadway Musical – 1960 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "West Side Story (Broadway, Winter Garden Theatre, 1960)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  171. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 16, 1960). "Wildcat – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Wildcat (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1960)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  172. ^ Taubman, Howard (December 17, 1960). "Theatre: Tame 'Wildcat'; Lucille Ball Musical Arrives at Alvin". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  173. ^ Strauss, Darin (July 31, 2020). "The 'Wildcat' Episode, or, Did Broadway Love Lucy?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  174. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 29, 1960). "Irma La Douce – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Irma La Douce (Broadway, Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre, 1960)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  175. ^ "'Irma la Douce' Moves". The New York Times. October 30, 1961. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  176. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 186; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 273.
  177. ^ Taubman, Howard (May 9, 1962). "Theatre: 'A Funny Thing Happened...'; Musical at the Alvin Stars Zero Mostel". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  178. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 273; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 24.
  179. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 29, 1966). ""It's a Bird...It's a Plane...It's Superman" – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    ""It's a Bird...It's a Plane...It's Superman" (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1966)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  180. ^ Zolotow, Sam (September 12, 1962). "'Bravo Giovanni' to End Saturday; Show, Which Resumed Run Friday, Will Close Musical of 'Teeth' Alvin Theatre Leased Theatrical Notes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  181. ^ "Theater: 'High Spirits' and Bea Lillie; Musical Comedy Opens at the Alvin Theater". The New York Times. April 8, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  182. ^ Chapman, John (April 8, 1964). "Beatrice Lillie, Tammy Grimes in Bequiling Show, 'High Spirits'". New York Daily News. p. 314. Retrieved March 1, 2022 – via newspapers.com.
  183. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 11, 1965). "Flora, The Red Menace – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Flora, the Red Menace (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  184. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 1, 1965). "Maurice Chevalier at 77 – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Maurice Chevalier at 77 (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  185. ^ Funke, Lewis (April 2, 1965). "Article 3 -- No Title; Belated 77th Birthday Party at the Alvin". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  186. ^ Taubman, Howard (May 12, 1965). "The Theater: 'Flora, the Red Menace'; Spoof of Communists in U.S. Begins Run". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  187. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 7, 1964). "High Spirits – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "High Spirits (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1964)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  188. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 273–274; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 24.
  189. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 10, 1965). "The Yearling – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
    "The Yearling (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1965)". Playbill. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  190. ^ Taubman, Howard (December 11, 1965). "Theater: 'The Yearling,' a Musical, Opens at Alvin; Show Based on Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings Novel Lloyd Richards Stages Story of Farm Famliy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  191. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 8, 1962). "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1962)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  192. ^ Kauffmann, Stanley (March 30, 1966). "Theater: 'It's a Bird...It's a Plane...It's Superman,' It's a Musical and It's Here; Comic-Strip Character Arrives at the Alvin Witty Point of View Is Basis of New Show". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  193. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 27, 1966). "Dinner at Eight – Broadway Play – 1966 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Dinner at Eight (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1966)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  194. ^ Kerr, Walter (September 28, 1966). "Theater: 'Dinner at Eight' at the Alvin; Kaufman-Ferber Play Directed by Guthrie". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  195. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 28, 1967). "Sherry! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Sherry! (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1967)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  196. ^ Kerr, Walter (March 29, 1967). "Theater: 'Sherry!' Opens; Dolores Gray Scores in Musical at Alvin". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  197. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 186; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 274.
  198. ^ Barnes, Clive (October 17, 1967). "Theater: 'Rosenkrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead'; Play by Tom Stoppard Opens at the Alvin". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  199. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 274; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 24.
  200. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 16, 1967). "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1967)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  201. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 186; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 274; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 14.
  202. ^ Barnes, Clive (October 4, 1968). "Theater: Howard Sackler's 'Great White Hope'; Play at the Alvin Stars James Earl Jones Edwin Sherin Staged Cheated Hero's Story". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  203. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 3, 1968). "The Great White Hope – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Great White Hope (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  204. ^ Barnes, Clive (April 27, 1970). "Theater: 'Company' Offers a Guide to New York's Marital jungle". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  205. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 26, 1970). "Company – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Company (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1970)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  206. ^ Calta, Louis (December 29, 1971). "3 Broadway Musicals to Close This Weekend After Long Runs". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  207. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 25.
  208. ^ Barnes, Clive (January 8, 1975). "'Shenandoah' Is Musical of Civil War". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  209. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 7, 1975). "Shenandoah – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Shenandoah (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1975)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  210. ^ Morrison, Hobe (July 9, 1975). "Legitimate: 'way Theatre Realty in Transition". Variety. Vol. 279, no. 9. pp. 51–52. ProQuest 1032475986.
  211. ^ a b Morrison, Hobe (November 12, 1975). "Legitimate: Nederlanders Acquire Alvin N.Y., for 100G Cash, $1 Mil Mortgage". Variety. Vol. 281, no. 1. p. 63. ProQuest 1286116199.
  212. ^ Calta, Louis (November 26, 1975). "Nederlander Family Adds Alvin to Its Holings". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  213. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 186; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 275.
  214. ^ Barnes, Clive (April 22, 1977). "Stage: 'Annie' Finds a Home". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  215. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 21, 1977). "Annie – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Annie (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1977)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  216. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 275.
  217. ^ a b c The Broadway League (January 17, 1982). "The Little Prince and the Aviator – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  218. ^ a b "'Little Prince' Closes Before Formal Opening". The New York Times. January 23, 1982. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  219. ^ Gerard, Jeremy (October 16, 1986). "Nederlander Loses Appeal of 'Little Prince' Damages". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  220. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 9, 1982). "Your Arms Too Short to Box With God – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Your Arms Too Short to Box with God (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1982)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  221. ^ a b Palmer, Robert (September 10, 1982). "Stage: ' Your Arms Too Short'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  222. ^ Rich, Frank (March 28, 1983). "Stage: Neil Simon's Brighton Beach'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  223. ^ a b Johnston, Laurie; Anderson, Susan Heller (June 30, 1983). "New York Day by Day". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  224. ^ a b "Legitimate: It's Now Neil Simon; Nee Alvin Theatre". Variety. Vol. 311, no. 10. July 6, 1983. pp. 69, 74. ProQuest 1438399684.
  225. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 186.
  226. ^ Freedman, Samuel G. (September 26, 1984). "Weintraub Buys Interest in Nederlander Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  227. ^ "Hollywood figure buys into theaters". Newsday. September 27, 1984. p. 171. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  228. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  229. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). "Is the final curtain near?". New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  230. ^ Schmalz, Jeffrey (August 7, 1985). "Landmarks Panel Listing Broadway Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  231. ^ Polsky, Carol (August 7, 1985). "3 Theaters Named Landmarks". Newsday. p. 32. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  232. ^ Shepard, Joan (December 19, 1985). "Limit on B'way landmarks urged". New York Daily News. p. 165. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  233. ^ Barbanel, Josh (December 20, 1985). "Theater Owners Ask Board to Delay Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved December 19, 2021.
  234. ^ Barbanel, Josh (December 21, 1985). "Board Acts to Evict Artists Occupying Brooklyn Lofts". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 22, 2021. Retrieved December 21, 2021.
  235. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 28, 1985). "Biloxi Blues – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Biloxi Blues (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1985)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  236. ^ a b Rich, Frank (March 29, 1985). "Stage: 'Biloxi Blues,' Simon's New Comedy". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  237. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 22, 1986). "Into the Light – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Into the Light (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1986)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  238. ^ a b "'Into the Light' to Close". The New York Times. October 24, 1986. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  239. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 31, 1987). "Blithe Spirit – Broadway Play – 1987 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Blithe Spirit (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1987)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  240. ^ a b Rich, Frank (April 1, 1987). "Theater: 'Blithe Spirit,' With Blythe Danner". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  241. ^ Gerard, Jeremy (June 18, 1987). "Tribute to Geraldine Page Fills Neil Simon Theater". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  242. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 11, 1987). "Mort Sahl on Broadway! – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Mort Sahl on Broadway! (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1987)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  243. ^ a b Gussow, Mel (October 12, 1987). "Theater: 'Mort Sahl'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  244. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 15, 1987). "Breaking the Code – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Breaking the Code (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1987)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  245. ^ a b Rich, Frank (November 16, 1987). "Stage: 'Breaking the Code'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  246. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 276.
  247. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 1, 1988). "Kenny Loggins on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Kenny Loggins on Broadway (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1988)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  248. ^ a b Holden, Stephen (November 3, 1988). "Review/Pop; Kenny Loggins, in Different Voices". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  249. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 24, 1989). "Orpheus Descending – Broadway Play – 1989 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Orpheus Descending (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1989)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  250. ^ a b Rich, Frank (September 25, 1989). "Review/Theater; Vanessa Redgrave in 'Orpheus': Matching Artistic Sensibilities". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  251. ^ Dunlap, David W. (August 23, 1989). "Developer Plans 52-Story Hotel Atop 2 Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on December 16, 2021. Retrieved December 16, 2021.
  252. ^ Berkowitz, Harry (August 23, 1989). "Luxury Hotel Planned Atop B'way Theaters". Newsday. pp. 21, 28. Archived from the original on December 16, 2021. Retrieved December 16, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  253. ^ Dunning, Jennifer (January 25, 1990). "Review/Dance; Don Cossacks Return For First Time Since 1976". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  254. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 17, 1990). "Jackie Mason: Brand New – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Jackie Mason: Brand New (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1990)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  255. ^ a b Gussow, Mel (October 18, 1990). "Review/Theater; Some New Barbs From Jackie Mason". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  256. ^ a b c Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 277.
  257. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 186; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 277.
  258. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 24, 1992). "Jake's Women – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Jake's Women (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1992)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  259. ^ Frank, Leah D. (March 13, 1994). "Theater Review; Simon's 'Jake's Women' Is Not Comedy Material". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  260. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 21, 1993). "Cyrano - The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Cyrano - The Musical (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1993)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  261. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (November 22, 1993). "Review/Theater: Cyrano: The Musical; Cyrano's Flights Have Touched Down On West 52d Street". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  262. ^ Richards, David (May 2, 1994). "Review/Theater; A Tiny Voice in a Nasty World Sings for a Savior". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  263. ^ a b Bloom 2007, pp. 186–187; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 277.
  264. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 1, 1994). "The Rise and Fall of Little Voice – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Rise and Fall of Little Voice (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1994)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  265. ^ "'Little Voice' Is to Close". The New York Times. May 3, 1994. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  266. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 14, 1994). "Basia on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Basia on Broadway (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1994)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  267. ^ a b Holden, Stephen (November 17, 1994). "Pop Review; Echoes From All Over In the Songs of Basia". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  268. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 6, 1995). "Laurie Anderson on Broadway: The Nerve Bible – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Laurie Anderson on Broadway (The Nerve Bible) (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1995)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  269. ^ a b Pareles, Jon (April 8, 1995). "Pop Review; Laurie Anderson, With Humanity". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  270. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 8, 1995). "Danny Gans on Broadway: The Man of Many Voices – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Danny Gans on Broadway: The Man of Many Voices (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1995)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  271. ^ a b Canby, Vincent (November 9, 1995). "Theater Review; Voices, Pacino To Dino". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  272. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 187; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 277.
  273. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 11, 1996). "The King and I – Broadway Musical – 1996 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The King and I (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1996)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  274. ^ a b Canby, Vincent (April 12, 1996). "Theater Review; Once Again, The Taming Of a Despot". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  275. ^ Lyman, Rick (February 17, 1998). "'View' to Close Briefly, Then Open at Neil Simon". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  276. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 14, 1997). "A View From the Bridge – Broadway Play – 1997 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "A View from the Bridge (Broadway, Criterion Center Stage Right, 1997)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  277. ^ "'Bridge' to Close". The New York Times. August 25, 1998. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  278. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 8, 1998). "Swan Lake – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Swan Lake (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1998)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  279. ^ a b Dunning, Jennifer (November 1, 1998). "Dance; 'Swan Lake': Is It Theater Or Dance, Gay Or Straight?". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  280. ^ a b The Broadway League (June 8, 1999). "Natalie Merchant – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Natalie Merchant (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1999)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  281. ^ a b Powers, Ann (June 11, 1999). "Pop Review; A Bit of Defiance Amid the Sweetness and Light". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  282. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 9, 1997). "The Scarlet Pimpernel – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved January 19, 2022.
    "The Scarlet Pimpernel (Broadway, Minskoff Theatre, 1997)". Playbill. Retrieved January 19, 2022.
  283. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (September 28, 1999). "Theater Review; Derring-Do Redone, Once More". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  284. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (April 28, 2000). "Theater Review; Rogue Sells Horns; Hope Is Free". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  285. ^ O'Toole, Fintan (April 28, 2000). "March right up & see 'Music Man'". New York Daily News. p. 893. Retrieved March 2, 2022 – via newspapers.com.
  286. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 27, 2000). "The Music Man – Broadway Musical – 2000 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Music Man (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2000)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  287. ^ "Theater Listings". The New York Times. December 23, 2001. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  288. ^ Tommasini, Anthony (September 12, 2001). "Music Review; A World Where All Is Not Sweetness and Light". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  289. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 21, 2002). "Elaine Stritch At Liberty – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Elaine Stritch at Liberty (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  290. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (February 22, 2002). "Critic's Choice/Theater; A Production Writ Large, Like Its Subject and Star". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  291. ^ Jones, Kenneth (May 21, 2002). "A New 'Do: Capacity of Neil Simon Theatre Will Increase for Hairspray". Playbill. Archived from the original on September 27, 2007. Retrieved February 11, 2009.
  292. ^ Brantley, Ben (August 16, 2002). "Theater Review; Through Hot Pink Glasses, a World That's Nice". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  293. ^ Barrick, Daniel (August 17, 2002). "'Hairspray' Holds Its Style in the Humidity". Newsday. p. 8. Retrieved March 2, 2022 – via newspapers.com.
  294. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 15, 2002). "Hairspray – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Hairspray (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2002)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  295. ^ "A Look Back at Hairspray in Celebration of Its Broadway Anniversary". Playbill. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  296. ^ Gans, Andrew (July 8, 2009). "HBO to Air Robin Williams' Weapons of Self-Destruction". Playbill. Retrieved July 29, 2015.
  297. ^ Ryzik, Melena (May 13, 2009). "Robin Williams Plans Return in September". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  298. ^ Healy, Patrick (December 29, 2009). "Revival of 'Ragtime' to Close Sunday". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  299. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 15, 2009). "Ragtime – Broadway Musical – 2009 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Ragtime (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2009)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  300. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (November 15, 2009). "I Hear America Singing, in Syncopation". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  301. ^ Marks, Peter (January 3, 2010). "'Ragtime's' closing: A sign of Broadway's thirst for crowd-pleasers". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 29, 2015.
  302. ^ Kuchwara, Michael (December 28, 2009). "Revival of 'Ragtime' set to close Sunday on Broadway". USA Today. Associated Press. Retrieved July 29, 2015.
  303. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 15, 2010). "Harry Connick, Jr. in Concert on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Harry Connick, Jr. in Concert on Broadway (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2010)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  304. ^ a b Holden, Stephen (July 16, 2010). "One-Man Whirlwind Visits Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  305. ^ "Harry Connick, Jr. In Concert on Broadway to Air on PBS in 2011". Playbill. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  306. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 26, 2010). "Rain – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2010)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  307. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (October 27, 2010). "Another Long and Winding Detour". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  308. ^ Healy, Patrick (December 6, 2010). "Two Broadway Shows On the Move". ArtsBeat. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  309. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (April 11, 2011). "Scamming as Fast as He Can". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  310. ^ Haagensen, Erik (April 20, 2011). "Theater Reviews: Catch Me if You Can". Back Stage. Vol. 52, no. 15. p. 16. ProQuest 871380097.
  311. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 10, 2011). "Catch Me If You Can – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Catch Me If You Can (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2011)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  312. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 22, 2012). "Jesus Christ Superstar – Broadway Musical – 2012 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Jesus Christ Superstar (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2012)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  313. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (March 23, 2012). "A Glitzy Execution in a Religious Revival". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  314. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 15, 2012). "Scandalous – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Scandalous: The Life and Trials of Aimee Semple McPherson (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2012)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  315. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (November 16, 2012). "Faith Healer Has Her Own Wounds to Tend". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  316. ^ Healy, Patrick (June 7, 2013). "Need a Theater? Broadway Vacancies Are Up". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  317. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 6, 2013). "Big Fish – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Big Fish (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2013)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  318. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (October 7, 2013). "A Dad's Tall Tales and a Down-to-Earth Son". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  319. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 6, 2014). "All The Way – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "All The Way (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2014)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  320. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (March 7, 2014). "Washington Power Play". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  321. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 26, 2014). "The Last Ship – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Last Ship (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2014)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  322. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (October 27, 2014). "Setting Course to Reclaim the Past". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  323. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 8, 2015). "Gigi – Broadway Musical – 2015 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Gigi (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2015)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  324. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (April 9, 2015). "Review: Vanessa Hudgens in a Squeaky Clean 'Gigi' on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  325. ^ Guerre, Liam La (July 27, 2015). "Dream Hotel Developers Buy Neil Simon Theatre's Air Rights for $9M". Commercial Observer. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  326. ^ Gerard, Jeremy (July 28, 2015). "Broadway Oxygen Sells For $450 Per Square Foot In Nederlander Deal". Deadline. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  327. ^ McGeehan, Patrick (August 6, 2006). "Theater District Will Get Taller, if Not Richer". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved February 4, 2022.
  328. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 19, 2015). "The Illusionists - Live on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Illusionists - Live On Broadway (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2015)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  329. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (November 20, 2015). "Review: 'The Illusionists' Showcases Magicians and Stagecraft". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  330. ^ a b The Broadway League (July 31, 2016). "Cats – Broadway Musical – 2016 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Cats (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2016)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  331. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (August 1, 2016). "Review: Does 'Cats' Have Nine Lives on Broadway? Two, Certainly". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  332. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 25, 2018). "Angels in America: Perestroika – Broadway Play – 2018 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    The Broadway League (March 25, 2018). "Angels in America: Millennium Approaches – Broadway Play – 2018 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2018)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  333. ^ a b Brantley, Ben (March 26, 2018). "Review: An 'Angels in America' That Soars on the Breath of Life". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  334. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 3, 2018). "The Cher Show – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Cher Show (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2018)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  335. ^ a b Green, Jesse (December 4, 2018). "Review: In 'The Cher Show,' I Got You, Babe. And You. And You". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  336. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 29, 2019). "The Illusionists - Magic of the Holidays – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Illusionists – Magic Of The Holidays (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2019)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  337. ^ a b Soloski, Alexis (December 6, 2019). "Holiday Magic: Fooled and Fooled and Fooled Again". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  338. ^ Paulson, Michael (October 10, 2019). "Michael Jackson Musical Is to Open on Broadway Next Summer". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  339. ^ Paulson, Michael (December 7, 2021). "Michael Jackson Musical Turns Down Volume on Abuse Allegations". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  340. ^ Wild, Stephi. "Meet the Cast of MJ the Musical; Begins Previews Tonight!". BroadwayWorld.com. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  341. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 1, 2022). "MJ The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "MJ The Musical (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 2022)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  342. ^ a b Green, Jesse (February 2, 2022). "Review: In 'MJ,' No One's Looking at the Man in the Mirror". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 2, 2022.
  343. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 18.
  344. ^ The Broadway League (October 26, 1931). "Mourning Becomes Electra – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Mourning Becomes Electra (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  345. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 19.
  346. ^ The Broadway League (November 8, 1932). "Music in the Air – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Music in the Air (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1932)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  347. ^ The Broadway League (August 28, 1939). "George White's Scandals [1939] – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "George White's Scandals [1939] (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1939)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  348. ^ The Broadway League (November 17, 1939). "Very Warm for May – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Fifth Column (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  349. ^ a b c d e f g h Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 20.
  350. ^ "The Taming of the Shrew (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1940)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  351. ^ The Broadway League (December 27, 1942). "Angna Enters – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Angna Enters (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1942)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  352. ^ The Broadway League (May 14, 1944). "The Maid as Mistress / The Secret of Suzanne – Broadway Musical – 1944 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Maid as Mistress / The Secret of Suzanne (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1944)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  353. ^ The Broadway League (November 16, 1944). "Sadie Thompson – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Sadie Thompson (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1944)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  354. ^ The Broadway League (January 25, 1945). "The Tempest – Broadway Play – 1945 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Tempest (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1945)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  355. ^ The Broadway League (March 22, 1945). "The Firebrand of Florence – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Firebrand of Florence (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1945)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  356. ^ The Broadway League (May 31, 1945). "Hollywood Pinafore – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Hollywood Pinafore (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1945)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  357. ^ The Broadway League (September 5, 1946). "A Flag Is Born – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "A Flag Is Born (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  358. ^ The Broadway League (October 8, 1946). "Cyrano de Bergerac – Broadway Play – 1946 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Cyrano de Bergerac (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  359. ^ The Broadway League (November 18, 1946). "Joan of Lorraine – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Joan of Lorraine (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1946)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  360. ^ The Broadway League (October 8, 1947). "Man and Superman – Broadway Play – 1947 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Man and Superman (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1947)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  361. ^ a b c d e f g h i Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 22.
  362. ^ The Broadway League (November 6, 1957). "Rumple – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Rumple (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1957)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  363. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 23.
  364. ^ The Broadway League (May 11, 1959). "Once Upon a Mattress – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Once Upon a Mattress (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1959)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  365. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Landmarks Preservation Commission 1985, p. 24.
  366. ^ The Broadway League (April 4, 1968). "The Education of H*Y*M*A*N K*A*P*L*A*N – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Education of H Y M A N K A P L A*N (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1968)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  367. ^ The Broadway League (November 1, 1973). "Molly – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Molly (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1973)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  368. ^ The Broadway League (February 17, 1974). "The Freedom of the City – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "The Freedom of the City (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1974)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  369. ^ The Broadway League (November 16, 1981). "Merrily We Roll Along – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Merrily We Roll Along (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1981)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  370. ^ The Broadway League (March 21, 1982). "Little Johnny Jones – Broadway Musical – 1982 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Little Johnny Jones (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1982)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  371. ^ Rich, Frank (March 22, 1982). "Stage: Cohan Revival, 'Little Johnny Jones'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  372. ^ The Broadway League (May 27, 1982). "Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up? – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up? (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1982)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  373. ^ Rich, Frank (May 28, 1982). "Stage: at the Alvin, 'Patent Leather Shoes'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  374. ^ The Broadway League (July 8, 1982). "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1982)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  375. ^ Rich, Frank (July 9, 1982). "Stage: 'Seven Brides for Seven Brothers'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  376. ^ The Broadway League (March 27, 1983). "Brighton Beach Memoirs – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Brighton Beach Memoirs (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1983)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  377. ^ The Broadway League (June 14, 1988). "Long Day's Journey Into Night – Broadway Play – 1988 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Long Day's Journey Into Night (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1988)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  378. ^ Rich, Frank (June 15, 1988). "Review/Theater; The Stars Align for 'Long Day's Journey'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.
  379. ^ The Broadway League (June 23, 1988). "Ah, Wilderness! – Broadway Play – 1988 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
    "Ah, Wilderness! (Broadway, Neil Simon Theatre, 1988)". Playbill. Retrieved February 27, 2022.
  380. ^ Rich, Frank (June 24, 1988). "Reviews/Theater; O'Neill's Idealistic 'Ah, Wilderness!'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved March 1, 2022.

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]