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Lunt-Fontanne Theatre

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Lunt-Fontanne Theatre
Globe Theatre (1910–1957)
Lunt-Fontanne Theatre - Dave Chappelle (48296060697).jpg
Seen in 2019
Address205 West 46th Street
Manhattan, New York City
United States
Coordinates40°45′33″N 73°59′10″W / 40.75922°N 73.9861°W / 40.75922; -73.9861Coordinates: 40°45′33″N 73°59′10″W / 40.75922°N 73.9861°W / 40.75922; -73.9861
OwnerStahl Organization and Nederlander Organization
OperatorNederlander Organization
TypeBroadway
Capacity1,509
ProductionTina—The Tina Turner Musical
Construction
OpenedJanuary 10, 1910
Closed1931
ReopenedMay 5, 1958
Rebuilt1957
Years active1910–1931
1958–present
ArchitectCarrère and Hastings
Website
broadwaydirect.com/venue/lunt-fontanne-theatre/
DesignatedDecember 8, 1987[1]
Reference no.1350[1]
Designated entityFacade

The Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, originally the Globe Theatre, is a Broadway theater at 205 West 46th Street in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City. Opened in 1910, the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre was designed by Carrère and Hastings in the Beaux-Arts style for Charles Dillingham. The theater is named after theatrical couple Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne; its original name was inspired by that of the Globe Theatre, London's Shakespearean playhouse. The current configuration of the interior, dating to 1958, has about 1,500 seats across two levels and is operated by the Nederlander Organization. The facade is a New York City landmark.

The theater's only surviving facade is on 46th Street and was once the carriage entrance. The ground level contains the theater's entrance on the east, as well as exits from the auditorium and stage house. On the upper stories, the facade contains a five-bay-wide central pavilion with arches, flanked by simpler pavilions on either side. Another entrance on Broadway, with an ornate lobby, was demolished in 1958. The auditorium originally contained three levels and box seating prior to its reconfiguration. The tiled roof and the auditorium's ceiling were designed with retractable sections, which are no longer in use.

The Globe Theatre opened on January 10, 1910. Most of the Globe's early shows were revues and musicals, including several productions by Dillingham. The Globe was converted into a movie house operated by the Brandt chain in the 1930s. City Playhouses Inc., a partnership between developers Robert W. Dowling and William Zeckendorf, bought it in 1957. After the firm Roche and Roche completely renovated the interior, the former Globe was renamed and reopened on May 5, 1958. City Playhouses sold the Lunt-Fontanne to producers Cy Feuer and Ernest H. Martin in 1960, and it was then sold to developer Stanley Stahl in 1965. The Nederlanders have operated the theater since 1973.

Site[edit]

The Lunt-Fontanne Theatre is on 206 West 46th Street, on the north sidewalk between Eighth Avenue and Broadway, near Times Square in the Theater District of Midtown Manhattan in New York City.[2][3] The rectangular land lot covers 13,957 square feet (1,296.6 m2).[3] The theater has a frontage of 139 feet (42 m) on 46th Street and a depth of about 100 feet (30 m).[3][4][5]

The Lunt-Fontanne shares the block with the Paramount Hotel (including Sony Hall) and Brooks Atkinson Theatre to the west, as well as the Hotel Edison to the north. Other nearby buildings include the Samuel J. Friedman Theatre to the northwest; the Ethel Barrymore Theatre and Morgan Stanley Building to the north; the Palace Theatre, Embassy Theatre, and I. Miller Building to the east; the New York Marriott Marquis to the south; and the Richard Rodgers Theatre, Music Box Theatre, and Imperial Theatre to the southwest.[3]

Design[edit]

The Lunt-Fontanne Theatre was designed by Carrère and Hastings in the Beaux-Arts style.[2][6] It was constructed for Charles Dillingham, opening in 1910 as the Globe Theatre.[2][7][8] The Lunt-Fontanne is the only surviving theater of four that Carrère and Hastings designed,[9][10] as well as the last theater designed by that firm.[10] Thompson–Starrett Co. was the main contractor.[11] The Nederlander Organization operates the theater.[12]

Facade[edit]

46th Street[edit]

Entrance doorways

The primary elevation of the Lunt-Fontanne's facade is on 46th Street[13] and was originally the carriage entrance.[14][15][16] It is symmetrically arranged, though the facade is shorter than its width.[13] The first story, at ground level, was designed as a raised basement.[11][17] The facade is divided into a central pavilion with five vertical bays, which is flanked by slightly recessed outer pavilions.[7][16][18] This arrangement, described as being in a modified Italian Renaissance style,[7][19] was reminiscent of Carrère and Hastings's earlier design for the Century (New) Theatre on Central Park West.[7][20][a] The westernmost portion of the facade contains the stage house, which is faced in brick and is recessed behind the main portion of the facade.[21]

The first story contains a granite water table, blocks of rusticated stone, and doorways in each bay. The recessed doorways are originally designed as archways, which are partially concealed by the marquee.[7][13] The westernmost door is the stage door.[13][12] The easternmost two sets of doors lead into the ticket lobby, and the other doors contain auxiliary exits from the auditorium. Each of the lobby and auditorium doors contain paneled-wood doors with bronze handles, and the openings are also flanked by display boxes. The marquee above the doorways was added after the theater opened; it contains a band with foliate decorations, above which acanthus leaves rise vertically. The first story is topped by a frieze containing foliate decorations and flowers. Above the five central doorways are archivolts with sculpted heads, as well as modillion blocks with alternating somber and snarling faces.[13] The arches and faces served to identify the building's theatrical use.[17]

Arched window in one of the five center bays
Outer pavilion

On the upper stories, the five central bays form a pavilion with double-height arches.[18] A terrace projects slightly from the second floor, above the first story's modillions, with a balustrade made of wrought iron.[13] This terrace was originally connected to the auditorium's first balcony level.[15][16] There are pilasters between each arch, topped by capitals in the Ionic style. Each of the archways contains a multi-paneled window, with a broken pediment and a spandrel bar dividing the second and third floor.[13] Above the centers of the arches are terracotta cartouches. The spandrels at the arches' corners contain semi-nude or nude female figures, holding theatrical masks that depict comedy and tragedy.[18] The fourth floor of the center bays has square openings with sash windows, which are surrounded by eared frames and flanked by carvings of caryatids.[13] The caryatids are topped by depictions of bows and helmets in the center three arches, as well as musical instruments in the outer two arches. A wave molding also runs above the fourth floor.[22]

The outer bays are faced in stucco. These have double-height windows at the second and third floors, with molded window frames and projecting lintels above. There is a circular window at the fourth story above each double-height window. Simple sash windows are placed on the side of the western pavilion, which projects from the stage house. A frieze with panels, as well as a course with dentils, runs above the outer pavilions. Above that is a cornice, which runs the whole width of the facade. The central pavilion has a deeply projecting parapet, below which are brackets and a decorative band of heads, cartouches, and panels. The theater's tiled roof is above the parapet.[21]

Former Broadway entrance[edit]

Broadway entrance

The Globe Theatre was built with an entrance on 1555 Broadway,[b] between 46th and 47th Streets.[23][24] The Broadway elevation was described in the New York Dramatic Mirror as the main entrance,[15][25] though other sources stated that the Broadway entrance was secondary to that on 46th Street.[14][16] The Broadway elevation was four stories high[26] and measured 24 feet (7.3 m) wide.[27] It had been adapted from a brownstone residence and contained signs in front of it.[24] The facade was flanked by Ionic pilasters and contained interspersed stone panels.[15][16][28] The second floor was decorated with "elaborately ornamented" arched casement windows.[29] There were also masks, garlands, cherubs, pediments, and a cornice on the facade.[26] The entrance led to the box-office vestibule and a corridor to the auditorium.[7]

The Broadway entrance is no longer extant.[28] It was cut off from the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre in 1957 when the theater was renovated. While the Broadway elevation physically existed for half a century afterward, it did not serve as an entrance, and tall signs were built in front of the four-story facade. In 2006, the old Broadway entrance was demolished, along with a neighboring Howard Johnson's restaurant at 1551 Broadway.[26] The Broadway entrance was replaced with an American Eagle Outfitters store.[30]

Interior[edit]

Original interior[edit]

The Globe Theatre's original interiors included ornamental plaster from Crane & Mahoney, metal lath from Arthur Greenfield Inc., and limestone from Farnum Cheshire.[31] The structural frame was made of steel and concrete.[32] The theater had an Italian Renaissance design with a color palette of gold, blue, and ivory white, as well as "rose du Barry" curtains.[15][33] At ground level, the promenade from Broadway was decorated in gold and rose.[32] The entire 46th Street frontage functioned as a large exit corridor.[11] The entrance vestibule from 46th Street was designed as a promenade with a similar color scheme to the rest of the theater.[9][34] The promenade from 46th Street measured 88 feet (27 m) long and 27 feet (8.2 m) wide.[35] A foyer at the second story (originally the first balcony level) led to the terrace on the 46th Street frontage of that story.[9][34] Dillingham's offices were housed on the upper stories, above the auditorium.[28][36]

Original auditorium with balconies

The auditorium was designed in a fan shape; according to contemporary publications, that shape allowed both optimal acoustics and sightlines.[11][37] The fan shape also allowed the audience to be closer to the performers than in other theaters, creating a more intimate house.[38] The auditorium had an orchestra level, two balconies, boxes, and a stage behind the proscenium arch.[9][11][39] There were 1,416 seats in total; the orchestra alone had 15 rows of seats.[9] The seats could be individually cooled by ice or heated by hot air from vents underneath. At the rear of the second balcony level, three holes could provide spotlight illumination.[32] There were twelve boxes, arranged in two tiers on both sides of the auditorium. The boxes were at the front of the theater and stepped down toward the proscenium; they were separated by Corinthian columns.[11][39] Rose-colored curtains were also hung above the upper tier of boxes.[33][38]

The auditorium had a coved ceiling when it was built.[38] The original design included a retractable ceiling, as well as a movable roof 20 feet (6.1 m) above.[40] According to contemporary sources, the ceiling had a retractable oval panel, which would be moved "when weather permits" to allow starlight and keep the auditorium cooler in summer.[11][37] The historian William Morrison could not find a reference to the ceiling ever opening; he said that retracting the roof would have been difficult because of debris buildup.[40] The proscenium arch was surrounded by a molded frame on all sides in a way that suggested "a rich frame to a picture".[11][39] The large stage was capable of accommodating all the necessary theatrical equipment.[11][41]

The backstage areas had "modern and convenient dressing rooms",[41] including showers for the actors.[11] An elevator connected the stage to a six-story dressing room wing in the rear.[32] The theater had provisions for fireproofing,[41] such as modern standpipe and sprinkler equipment, automatic alarms, and watchmen's systems.[31]

Modifications[edit]

When the theater was renovated in 1958, most of the old Globe's interiors were removed and redecorated in an 18th-century style.[38][42] According to Robert Dowling, who helped redevelop the theater, the promenade was redecorated in a rococo style with "exotic" wall decorations.[35] The mezzanine contained a lounge with paneled mirrors, as well as murals depicting opera houses in Europe.[38] Blue rococo floor coverings were installed throughout the theater, with a layer of thick foam underneath.[43]

In the auditorium, the two levels of balconies were removed, and a single balcony level with 700 seats was installed. The orchestra level was arranged with 800 seats.[35][44] In both levels, the first few rows were upholstered in rococo blue silk above rubber foam cushions, with additional cushions for short guests. Tickets to the front-row seats were higher than those for the remaining seats, which were salvaged from the old Globe's interiors.[43] Modern estimates of the seating capacity vary: Playbill cites a capacity of 1,470 seats,[12] while the Broadway League cites 1,519 seats.[45]

After the renovation, the proscenium measured 49 feet (15 m) across, while the stage was 34 feet (10 m) deep. A new curtain with a sunburst design was installed, and a mural with depictions of theatrical muses was painted on the ceiling.[35] The ceiling mural, painted by Edward Melcarth,[46] was decorated with clouds, which hid ventilation openings.[43] The retractable ceiling was also removed with the renovation.[40] The rear (west) wall was moved about 30 feet (9.1 m) west, and the remaining walls were retained.[47]

History[edit]

Times Square became the epicenter for large-scale theater productions between 1900 and the Great Depression.[48] Manhattan's theater district had begun to shift from Union Square and Madison Square during the first decade of the 20th century.[49][50] From 1901 to 1920, forty-three theaters were built around Broadway in Midtown Manhattan, including the Globe Theatre.[51] The Globe was developed by Charles Dillingham,[8] who first was a theatrical critic and then an associate of impresario Daniel Frohman in the late 1890s. Dillingham began to produce more of his own plays in the first decade of the 20th century, upon Frohman's urging.[52][53]

Globe Theatre[edit]

Development and early years[edit]

Cigarette trading card showing the Globe Theatre, c. 1910s

The Dillingham Theatre Company bought a 30.6-by-83.4-foot (9.3 by 25.4 m) plot at 1555 Broadway and a 139-by-100-foot (42 by 30 m) assemblage at 203-217 West 46th Street[4][5] in November 1907. Dillingham hired Carrère and Hastings to design a theater along Broadway and 46th Street.[54][55] The Dillingham Theatre Company took title to the land in January 1908,[4][5] and plans for the theater were filed that March.[56] Dillingham originally wanted to call his new theater the Gaiety, but George M. Cohan and Sam H. Harris were also planning a theater with the same name across 46th Street.[5] In March 1909, Thompson-Starrett was hired as the main contractor.[57][58] The same month, Dillington announced he would name his theater in honor of the Globe Theatre, the Shakespearean playhouse in London.[59][60] That October, Carrère and Hastings filed plans to renovate the existing brownstone at 1555 Broadway, adapting it as the Globe's entrance.[29]

The theater opened on January 10, 1910, with the musical The Old Town featuring Dave Montgomery and Fred Stone.[61][62] The year of its opening, the Globe also hosted The Echo,[63][64] which featured the now-popular song Skidamarink,[63] as well as a four-week limited engagement from French actress Sarah Bernhardt.[65][66] The theater's early offerings were mostly revues and musicals because Dillingham largely produced musicals.[36] The Slim Princess with Elsie Janis, which premiered in 1911, was the next musical by Dillingham to be staged at the Globe,[61][67] and Bernhardt returned for another limited engagement the same year.[66][68] Janis, Montgomery, and Stone returned in 1912 for The Lady of the Slipper,[61][69] which was a hit with 232 performances.[70][71] Montgomery and Stone also starred in Chin-Chin, which opened in 1914[72] and had 295 performances at the Globe.[61][73] Dillingham also staged the musical Stop! Look! Listen! at the Globe in 1915,[74][75] with a ragtime score composed by Irving Berlin.[61]

The first straight play at the Globe premiered in 1916, with J. Hartley Manners's The Harp of Life.[23] The play featured Manners's wife Laurette Taylor along with young British actress Lynn Fontanne (a later namesake of the theater).[76][77] Fred Stone returned the next year in Jack O' Lantern, following the death of Stone's partner Montgomery.[78][79] The Canary, featuring Julia Sanderson and Joseph Cawthorn, premiered in 1918;[80][81] the Globe also hosted a limited run of that year's Ziegfeld Follies.[82][83] The decade ended with She's a Good Fellow with Joseph Santley and the Duncan Sisters in 1919,[84][85] the run of which was truncated by the 1919 Actors' Equity Association strike.[84][86] Dillingham had produced all of the theater's musicals and plays during the 1910s,[42] while Jerome Kern and Anne Caldwell collaborated on many of the musical scores.[66]

1920s and early 1930s[edit]

Early view of the theater from 46th Street, looking west

Dillingham had originally leased the theater from the Dillingham Theatre Company, operated by the Gould family. In April 1920, he bought the theater outright for $1.25 million, with plans to remodel the property for his offices.[87][88][89] That July, W. T. Smith filed plans for a seven-story office wing at 1555 Broadway.[90] Elaborate revues at the Globe, which were staged starting in the late 1910s, continued into the 1920s.[66] These included the 1920 edition of George White's Scandals,[91][92] the Globe's first show that did not have Dillingham as a writer.[42] It was followed the same year by another Dillingham play, Tip Top with Stone and the Duncan Sisters,[91][93] running 241 performances.[94][95] The 1921 edition of the Ziegfeld Follies was staged at the Globe,[96][97] and Kern and Caldwell's production Good Morning, Dearie opened the same year.[91][98] Further editions of George White's Scandals premiered in 1922[96][99] and 1923.[96][100] The former edition's score inspired the opera Porgy and Bess, while the latter saw little success.[101]

Dillingham leased the theater to Oliver Morosco in January 1923 for the production of Lady Butterfly at the then-exorbitant price of $6,000 a week.[102] Fred Stone and his daughter Dorothy performed later that year in the musical Stepping Stones,[103][104] another Dillingham production.[66] This was followed in 1924 by comedian Ed Wynn's The Grab Bag,[103][105] which ran 184 performances.[106][107] A major hit came to the Globe in 1925 with the opening of No, No, Nanette,[108][109] where featured performer Louise Groody became the first musical-comedy performer to earn over $1 million.[42] Florenz Ziegfeld Jr. was slated to run the Ziegfeld Follies at the Globe the following year, but he was not allowed to use the name due to a disagreement with his partners Klaw and Erlanger.[110] As a result, in 1926, he hosted No Foolin' (subsequently Ziegfeld's American Revue) at the Globe.[103][111] The same year, Dillingham produced Criss Cross with Fred and Dorothy Stone,[103][112] and Oh, Please! featured Beatrice Lillie.[110][113] Fred Stone also planned to return to the Globe in 1928, appearing in Three Cheers with Dorothy, but he was replaced at the last minute with Will Rogers;[114][115] the play ran through early 1929.[116][117]

Bankruptcy and cinematic use[edit]

By 1930, the Globe Theatre was leased to Radio-Keith-Orpheum (RKO) as a movie house,[118][119] at least until a new RKO theater was finished on the site of the old Columbia Theatre.[120] That year, the Dillingham Theater Company obtained a $200,000 second mortgage on the theater.[121] Upon the expiry of RKO's lease in July 1931,[120] the Globe returned to legitimate use.[122][123] The play The Cat and the Fiddle, which opened later that year,[124][125] was the last legitimate production at the Globe before the theater became a cinema for 25 years.[126] Due to the Globe's financial troubles, The Cat and the Fiddle was moved to George M. Cohan's Theatre in May 1932.[127][128] At the time, the second mortgage holder, Spear Securities, sought to foreclose on the theater.[128] Dillingham's friends, including Fred Stone, attempted to recover the theater on his behalf.[129]

Theater entrance on 46th Street

Dillingham ultimately went into bankruptcy in 1933 with debts of over $7 million.[130][131] A major factor in the bankruptcy was the Great Depression, during which many Broadway theaters were impacted by declining attendance.[40] Spear Securities acquired the theater at a foreclosure auction in October 1932 for $1.125 million.[132][133] Brandt Theatres subsequently began to lease the Globe for films.[134][135] By the next year, the theater was owned by the Globe Land Corporation, and the New York Public Library held a $1.1 million first mortgage on the theater.[136] Under Brandt's management, the Globe largely showed reruns, which drew complaints from the operator of the rival Roxy Theatre.[137][138]

In February 1936, Harry Brandt of Brandt Theatres announced that he had purchased the Globe for $1.15 million, subject to existing mortgages.[135][139] He then announced that he would renovate the Globe to serve as headquarters for his company.[140] Brandt announced in 1938 that the Globe would begin to offer five-act vaudeville, followed by one film.[141] The Globe hosted numerous premieres of films, including The Road Back in 1937[142] and The Roosevelt Story in 1947.[143] Among the other films screened at the theater were Souls at Sea (1937),[144] One of Our Aircraft Is Missing (1942),[145] Eagle Squadron (1942),[146] Somewhere in France (1943),[147] The Macomber Affair (1947),[148] Anna (1951),[149] and On the Threshold of Space (1956).[150] In 1951, Al Beckman and Johnny Pransky considered acquiring the Globe for their vaudeville circuit.[151]

Lunt-Fontanne Theatre[edit]

Renovation and reopening[edit]

By 1955, Roger L. Stevens, Robert Whitehead, and Robert W. Dowling were negotiating to acquire the Globe Theatre for legitimate use.[152] Stevens and Dowling reneged after conducting a study, which found they would have to spend $400,000 to renovate the theater and that the venue would only be able to fit about 1,300 people.[153] The next June, Stevens partnered with William Zeckendorf in another bid to acquire the theater, with Cy Feuer and Ernest Martin as the producers.[154] Despite some delays in September 1956,[155][156] Stevens, Whitehead, Dowling, and Zeckendorf ultimately acquired the theater in 1957 under the City Playhouses name.[157] Stevens and Whitehead were affiliated with Producers Theatre, while Dowling was affiliated with the City Investing Company, both of which had a 40 percent ownership stake. Zeckendorf's company Webb and Knapp owned the remaining 20 percent of the theater.[158]

The firm of Roche and Roche renovated the interior extensively, replacing the two balcony levels with a single balcony, as well as closing and sealing the Broadway entrance.[35][42] In addition, the original decorations were largely eliminated and replaced with 18th-century design details.[42][43] The renovated theater had a plexiglass marquee on 46th Street with scalloped decorations,[47][159] under which was a black-and-white sidewalk.[35] When the theater was purchased, it was supposed to reopen in January 1958. The premiere attraction was planned to be the musical Zuleika,[160] which was then swapped with Shakespeare's Much Ado About Nothing.[161][162] In February 1958, the Globe was renamed in honor of Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, who planned to retire after the inaugural show at the theater.[44][163]

The Lunt-Fontanne Theatre opened on May 5, 1958, with Friedrich Dürrenmatt's The Visit, starring Lunt and Fontanne.[47][164][165] Dowling, Stevens, and Whitehead had been threatened with a fine if they had not opened Visit by May 5.[166] This production was the last one to feature Lunt and Fontanne on Broadway.[157] Later that year, Zeckendorf's company Webb and Knapp sold the former entrance building at 1555 Broadway to the Rubinstein-Klein Realty Corporation.[27][167] The revival of Much Ado About Nothing, with John Gielgud and Margaret Leighton, opened in 1959.[168][169] It was followed the same year by the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical The Sound of Music,[165][170] which had 1,443 performances during the next three years, including some at the Mark Hellinger Theatre.[168][171]

1960s to 1980s[edit]

Viewed from across 46th Street

In 1960, City Playhouses leased the theater to producers Cy Feuer and Ernest H. Martin for $2 million.[158][172] The musical Little Me with Sid Caesar opened in 1962;[173][174] in spite of critical acclaim, the musical's run ended early due to a newspaper strike.[157] The following year, Martha Graham and her dance company performed at the Globe.[175][176] Richard Burton appeared in a revival of Hamlet in 1964,[165][177] the longest run of the play on Broadway;[42][178] it was followed by several short musical runs.[42] Feuer and Martin obtained total control of the Lunt-Fontanne the same year, when they bought the remaining ownership stake from the Kratter Corporation for $1 million.[179][180] The partners sold the Lunt-Fontanne to developer Stanley Stahl in 1965.[181] That year, the theater staged Skyscraper with Julie Harris's first musical appearance,[182][183] followed in 1966 by Walking Happy with Norman Wisdom.[184][185]

Shows of the late 1960s included Marlene Dietrich's Broadway debut in 1967,[186][187] followed the same year by How Now, Dow Jones.[188][189] Another revival of Hamlet was staged at the Lunt-Fontanne in 1969, this time with Nicol Williamson.[190][191] The theater then underwent a renovation and was leased for one year by Lester Osterman.[192][193] Afterward, Hal Linden and Keene Curtis starred in the musical The Rothschilds.[194][195] The Nederlander Organization started operating the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre in 1973.[45] For much of that decade, the Lunt-Fontanne staged many revivals.[188] Among them were A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum in 1972,[196][197] The Pajama Game in 1973,[198][199] Hello, Dolly! in 1978,[200][201] and Peter Pan in 1979.[202][203] The theater also hosted original productions during the 1970s, such as Rex in 1976.[204][205]

In 1981, Duke Ellington's revue Sophisticated Ladies opened at the Lunt-Fontanne,[206][207] running for 767 performances.[208][209] This was followed by two revivals staged in 1983 by Zev Buffman:[209] Private Lives[210][211] and The Corn Is Green.[212][213] In addition, Peggy Lee made her Broadway premiere the same year in a limited solo engagement.[214][215] This was followed by a revival of The Wiz in 1984,[216][217] and Jerry Weintraub purchased a stake in the operation of the Lunt-Fontanne the same year.[218][219] A revival of The Iceman Cometh followed in 1985.[220][221] The originals Uptown... It's Hot![222][223] and Smile were staged in 1986,[224][225] as well as a transfer of The Gospel at Colonus in 1988.[226][227] In addition to these, the Lunt-Fontanne hosted special appearances,[228] including illusionist Doug Henning (1984);[229] Grateful Dead vocalist Jerry Garcia (1987);[230] rock band Joan Jett and the Blackhearts (1989);[231][232] and singer Freddie Jackson (1989).[233] Stahl and James M. Nederlander considered leasing out the Lunt-Fontanne as a movie theater in 1989, citing a downturn in theatrical bookings;[234] The Threepenny Opera opened later that year.[235][236] The theater also hosted the 43rd Tony Awards in 1989,[237] followed by the 44th Tony Awards in 1990.[238]

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC) had started to consider protecting the Lunt-Fontanne as a landmark in 1982,[239] with discussions continuing over the next several years.[240] The LPC designated the Lunt-Fontanne's facade as a landmark on December 8, 1987, but the modified interior was denied landmark status.[241][242] This was part of the commission's wide-ranging effort in 1987 to grant landmark status to Broadway theaters.[243] The New York City Board of Estimate ratified the designations in March 1988.[244] The Nederlanders, the Shuberts, and Jujamcyn collectively sued the LPC in June 1988 to overturn the landmark designations of 22 theaters, including the Lunt-Fontanne, on the merit that the designations severely limited the extent to which the theaters could be modified.[245] The lawsuit was escalated to the New York Supreme Court and the Supreme Court of the United States, but these designations were ultimately upheld in 1992.[246]

1990s to present[edit]

The theater, staging Beauty and the Beast

A second revival of Peter Pan, featuring Cathy Rigby, was staged at the Lunt-Fontanne in 1990,[247][248] as was a concert by Harry Connick Jr.[228][249] A 1991 transfer of Oh, Kay! closed during previews;[250][251] Catskills on Broadway opened later the same year and ran for 13 months.[252] Afterward, several flops were staged at the Lunt-Fontanne,[253] including the musical Ain't Broadway Grand in 1993,[254][255] as well as The Best Little Whorehouse Goes Public[256][257] and Comedy Tonight in 1994.[258][259] Carol Channing, who had previously performed at the Lunt-Fontanne during the 1978 revival of Hello, Dolly!,[260][261] returned for another revival in 1995, which ran 118 performances.[262][263] The Royal Shakespeare Company produced A Midsummer Night's Dream in 1996,[264][265] and the Sovremennik Theatre had eight Russian-language performances of two productions later that year.[260][266]

The musical Titanic opened in 1997[267][268] and was a hit, earning enough money to fund renovations of the theater.[40] In addition, the theater's owners sold some air rights to the developers of the neighboring Planet Hollywood Hotel in 1998.[269] After Titanic's run ended in March 1999,[270][271] the theater was closed for much of the year while Sachs Morgan Studio renovated it, changing the lighting and paint scheme.[272] The Planet Hollywood Hotel was being built during the same time, requiring contractors on that hotel to carefully monitor the Lunt-Fontanne for damage.[273] Beauty and the Beast opened at the Lunt-Fontanne in late 1999, transferring from the Palace Theatre with a downsized cast,[274] and ran until 2007.[275][276] The Lunt-Fontanne was again renovated,[277] and the bar area was demolished and rebuilt to accommodate a new building to the east.[278] The Little Mermaid then ran at the Lunt-Fontanne from 2007 to 2009.[279][280]

The Lunt-Fontanne generally hosted shorter musicals and appearances in the 2010s.[12][45] These included The Addams Family in 2010 and 2011;[281][282] Ghost the Musical[283][284] and A Christmas Story: The Musical in 2012;[285][286] Motown: The Musical from 2013 to 2015;[287][288] and Finding Neverland in 2015.[289][290] As part of a settlement with the United States Department of Justice in 2014, the Nederlanders agreed to improve disabled access at their nine Broadway theaters, including the Lunt-Fontanne.[291][292] The theater hosted a limited engagement by Frankie Valli & the Four Seasons[293] and Kristin Chenoweth's solo My Love Letter to Broadway[294][295] in 2016; the musical Charlie and the Chocolate Factory in 2017;[296][297] and Summer: The Donna Summer Musical in 2018.[298][299] Numerous performers had limited engagements at the Lunt-Fontanne in 2019[12][45] before the opening of Tina that November.[300][301] The theater closed on March 12, 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic;[302] it reopened on October 8, 2021, with performances of Tina.[303] Due to poor ticket sales, Tina is only planned to run until August 2022.[304][305]

Notable productions[edit]

Globe Theatre[edit]

Lunt-Fontanne Theatre[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ According to the Landmarks Preservation Commission, the main differences were in decorative details. The Century Theatre had square doorways as opposed to the Globe's round arches, and the Century had a rounded corner with two identical facades.[20]
  2. ^ One source erroneously cites this as 1515 Broadway,[7] which is the address of One Astor Plaza two blocks south.[3]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 1.
  2. ^ a b c White, Norval; Willensky, Elliot & Leadon, Fran (2010). AIA Guide to New York City (5th ed.). New York: Oxford University Press. p. 298. ISBN 978-0-19538-386-7.
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  170. ^ Atkinson, Brooks (November 22, 1959). "Sound of Music; Mary Martin as One Of Trapp Family Singers". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
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    "The Sound of Music Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  172. ^ Gross, Jesse (August 17, 1960). "$13,300,000 Worth of Broadway Legit Realty Deals; Lunt-Fontanne Latest". Variety. Vol. 219, no. 12. pp. 1, 61. ProQuest 1017054578.
  173. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 17, 1962). "Little Me – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Little Me Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  174. ^ Taubman, Howard (November 19, 1962). "Theater: Caesar and Virginia Martin in 'Little Me'; Comedian Employs His Gifts for Mimicry Neil Simon's Musical at the Lunt-Fontanne". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  175. ^ The Broadway League (October 13, 1963). "Martha Graham – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Martha Graham Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  176. ^ Hughes, Allen (October 16, 1963). "Dance: Martha Graham". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  177. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 9, 1964). "Hamlet – Broadway Play – 1964 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Hamlet Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  178. ^ "Run of 'Hamlet' Adding 6 Weeks: Play's Longest Engagement to Have 140 Performances". The New York Times. May 22, 1964. p. 43. ISSN 0362-4331. ProQuest 115542761.
  179. ^ "Feuer and Martin Buy Lunt‐Fontanne Theater". The New York Times. July 8, 1964. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  180. ^ "Legitimate: Feuer and Martin Buy Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Variety. Vol. 235, no. 8. July 15, 1964. p. 54. ProQuest 1014835326.
  181. ^ Zolotow, Sam (March 10, 1965). "Feuer and Martin Sell Lunt-Fontanne Theater". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  182. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 13, 1965). "Skyscraper – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Skyscraper Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  183. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 154; Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 39–40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  184. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 26, 1966). "Walking Happy – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Walking Happy Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  185. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 155; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  186. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 9, 1967). "Marlene Dietrich – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Marlene Dietrich Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  187. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  188. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 155; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  189. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 7, 1967). "How Now, Dow Jones – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "How Now, Dow Jones Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  190. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 1, 1969). "Hamlet – Broadway Play – 1969 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Hamlet Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  191. ^ a b Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  192. ^ "Osterman Acquires the Lunt-Fontanne". The New York Times. September 23, 1970. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  193. ^ "Legitimate: Osterman Corp In Lease, Buy Option Of Lunt-Fontanne". Variety. Vol. 260, no. 6. September 23, 1970. p. 7. ProQuest 1505820356.
  194. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 19, 1970). "The Rothschilds – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Rothschilds Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  195. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 155; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  196. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 30, 1972). "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum – Broadway Musical – 1972 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  197. ^ Barnes, Clive (March 31, 1972). "Stage: 'Funny Thing' Happens Again". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  198. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 9, 1973). "The Pajama Game – Broadway Musical – 1973 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Pajama Game Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  199. ^ Barnes, Clive (December 10, 1973). "Theater: 'The Pajama Game' Returns". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  200. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 5, 1978). "Hello, Dolly! – Broadway Musical – 1978 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Hello, Dolly! Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  201. ^ Eder, Richard (March 6, 1978). "'Hello, Dolly!.' Is Back". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  202. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 6, 1979). "Peter Pan – Broadway Musical – 1979 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Peter Pan Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  203. ^ Kerr, Walter (September 7, 1979). "Stage: Soaring in 'Peter Pan'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  204. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 25, 1976). "Rex – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Rex Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  205. ^ a b Bloom 2007, pp. 155–156; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  206. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 156; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 15.
  207. ^ Rich, Frank (March 2, 1981). "Stage: Ellington's 'Sophisticated Ladies'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  208. ^ a b The Broadway League (February 1, 1981). "Sophisticated Ladies – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Sophisticated Ladies Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  209. ^ a b c d e f Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 32.
  210. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 8, 1983). "Private Lives – Broadway Play – 1983 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Private Lives Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  211. ^ Lawson, Carol (June 16, 1983). "Private Lives' to Close Early". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  212. ^ a b The Broadway League (August 22, 1983). "The Corn Is Green – Broadway Play – 1983 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Corn Is Green Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  213. ^ Gussow, Mel (August 23, 1983). "Theater: 'The Corn Is Green'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  214. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 156; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40.
  215. ^ "'Peg' Closes". The New York Times. December 19, 1983. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  216. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 24, 1984). "The Wiz – Broadway Musical – 1984 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Wiz Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  217. ^ Rich, Frank (May 25, 1984). "Stage: 'The Wiz' Back on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  218. ^ Freedman, Samuel G. (September 26, 1984). "Weintraub Buys Interest in Nederlander Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021.
  219. ^ "Hollywood figure buys into theaters". Newsday. September 27, 1984. p. 171. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 15, 2021 – via newspapers.com.
  220. ^ a b The Broadway League (September 29, 1985). "The Iceman Cometh – Broadway Play – 1985 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Iceman Cometh Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  221. ^ Rich, Frank (September 30, 1985). "Theater: Jason Robards in 'the Iceman Cometh'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  222. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 29, 1986). "Uptown...It's Hot! – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Uptown...It's Hot! Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  223. ^ Rich, Frank (January 29, 1986). "Theater: 'Uptown' a Musical". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  224. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 24, 1986). "Smile – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Smile Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  225. ^ "'Smile' Closes". The New York Times. January 6, 1987. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  226. ^ a b The Broadway League (March 24, 1988). "The Gospel at Colonus – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Gospel at Colonus Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  227. ^ "'Colonus' to Close". The New York Times. May 11, 1988. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  228. ^ a b c d e f Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40.
  229. ^ Gussow, Mel (December 15, 1984). "Theater: Doug Henning Offers 'World of Magic'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  230. ^ Palmer, Robert (October 20, 1987). "Music: Jerry Garcia Band". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  231. ^ Pareles, Jon (March 23, 1989). "Critic's Notebook; The Rockers Discover Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  232. ^ The Broadway League (February 1, 1989). "Joan Jett and the Blackhearts on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Joan Jett and the Black Hearts on Broadway Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  233. ^ Watrous, Peter (September 16, 1989). "Reviews/Music; On a Dual Bill, Two Kinds Of Vocal Pyrotechnics". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  234. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (June 1, 1989). "The Lunt-Fontanne May Turn to Movies". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  235. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 5, 1989). "3 Penny Opera – Broadway Musical – 1989 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Threepenny Opera Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  236. ^ Rich, Frank (November 6, 1989). "Review/Theater; 'Threepenny Opera,' With Sting". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  237. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (June 5, 1989). "'Heidi' and 'Jerome Robbins's Broadway' Win the Top Tonys". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  238. ^ Rothstein, Mervyn (June 4, 1990). "Tonys Are Won by 'Grapes of Wrath' and 'City of Angels'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 13, 2021.
  239. ^ Dunlap, David W. (October 20, 1982). "Landmark Status Sought for Theaters". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  240. ^ Shepard, Joan (August 28, 1985). "Is the final curtain near?". New York Daily News. pp. 462, 464. Archived from the original on September 21, 2021. Retrieved September 16, 2021.
  241. ^ Dunlap, David W. (December 14, 1987). "7 Theaters Become Landmarks; Owners Plan Appeal". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 17, 2021. Retrieved November 2, 2021.
  242. ^ "Legitimate: N.Y.C. Landmarks 7; Owners Don't Like It". Variety. Vol. 329, no. 8. December 16, 1987. p. 85. ProQuest 1438478876.
  243. ^ Dunlap, David W. (November 22, 1987). "The Region; The City Casts Its Theaters In Stone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 16, 2021. Retrieved October 16, 2021.
  244. ^ Purdum, Todd S. (March 12, 1988). "28 Theaters Are Approved as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved November 20, 2021.
  245. ^ Dunlap, David W. (June 21, 1988). "Owners File Suit to Revoke Theaters' Landmark Status". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 29, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  246. ^ Dunlap, David W. (May 27, 1992). "High Court Upholds Naming Of 22 Theaters as Landmarks". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on October 30, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  247. ^ a b The Broadway League (December 13, 1990). "Peter Pan – Broadway Musical – 1990 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Peter Pan Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  248. ^ Klein, Alvin (November 25, 1990). "Theater; Cathy Rigby's 'Peter Pan': 'Real Wish Fulfillment'". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  249. ^ Holden, Stephen (November 26, 1990). "Review/Music; Harry Connick Jr., On Piano, Drums, Etc". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  250. ^ "'Oh, Kay!' Closes Again". The New York Times. April 17, 1991. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  251. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 1, 1990). "Oh, Kay! – Broadway Musical – 1990 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Oh, Kay! Broadway @ Richard Rodgers Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  252. ^ The Broadway League (December 5, 1991). "Catskills on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
    "Catskills on Broadway Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  253. ^ Botto & Mitchell 2002, pp. 40–41.
  254. ^ "'Ain't Broadway' to Close". The New York Times. May 5, 1993. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  255. ^ The Broadway League (April 18, 1993). "Ain't Broadway Grand – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
    "Ain't Broadway Grand Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  256. ^ a b The Broadway League (May 10, 1994). "The Best Little Whorehouse Goes Public – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Best Little Whorehouse Goes Public Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  257. ^ a b c Bloom 2007, p. 156; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 41.
  258. ^ Canby, Vincent (January 1, 1995). "Sunday View; Out of Chaos a Show Is (Sometimes) Born". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  259. ^ The Broadway League (December 18, 1994). "Comedy Tonight – Broadway Show – Special". IBDB. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
    "Comedy Tonight Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  260. ^ a b c d e Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 41.
  261. ^ "Theater; By Golly, It's Dolly Again". The New York Times. October 8, 1995. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  262. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 19, 1995). "Hello, Dolly! – Broadway Musical – 1995 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Hello, Dolly! Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  263. ^ "Hello, Dolly!' to Close". The New York Times. January 24, 1996. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  264. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 1, 1996). "Theater Review; A 'Dream' to Reach the Eye and the Funny Bone". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  265. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 7, 1996). "The Three Sisters – Broadway Play – 1996 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Three Sisters Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  266. ^ Marks, Peter (November 9, 1996). "Love and Anguish of Women Who Have Only One Another". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  267. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 23, 1997). "Titanic – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Titanic Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  268. ^ Brantley, Ben (April 24, 1997). "'Titanic,' the Musical, Is Finally Launched, and the News Is It's Still Afloat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  269. ^ Dunlap, David W. (May 17, 1998). "Using Thin Air To Let Buildings Grow Taller". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  270. ^ McKinley, Jesse (March 5, 1999). "On Stage and Off". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  271. ^ Brodesser, Claude; Isherwood, Charle (March 8, 1999). "Legit: 'Titanic' Bids Adieu; 'Beast' Eyes Berth". Variety. Vol. 374, no. 3. pp. 69, 74. ProQuest 1401413208.
  272. ^ McBride, Murdoch (December 13, 1999). "Nederlanders Unveil Refurbished Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  273. ^ Holusha, John (December 8, 1999). "Commercial Real Estate; For Unusual Tower, It's All About Signs". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  274. ^ Pogrebin, Robin (September 19, 1999). "Theater; Downsizing The Broadway Musical". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  275. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 18, 1994). "Beauty and the Beast – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Beauty and the Beast Broadway @ Palace Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  276. ^ a b Robertson, Campbell (January 18, 2007). "'Mermaid' Approaches, So 'Beauty' Will Close". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  277. ^ Botto, Louis; Viagas, Robert (2010). At This Theatre: Revised and Updated Edition. Applause Theatre & Cinema Books. p. 468. ISBN 978-1-4768-5027-6.
  278. ^ McGeehan, Patrick (June 24, 2007). "At Lunt-Fontanne, an Impasse Nears a Finale". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 9, 2021.
  279. ^ a b The Broadway League (January 10, 2008). "The Little Mermaid – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Little Mermaid Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  280. ^ a b Itzkoff, Dave (June 30, 2009). "'Little Mermaid' to Close". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  281. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 8, 2010). "The Addams Family – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Addams Family Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  282. ^ a b Itzkoff, Dave (August 24, 2011). "Oh, Snap: 'Addams Family' Broadway Musical Will Close at Year's End". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  283. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 23, 2012). "Ghost The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Ghost The Musical Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  284. ^ a b Schuessler, Jennifer (July 24, 2012). "'Ghost the Musical' to Close on Aug. 18". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  285. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 19, 2012). "A Christmas Story The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "A Christmas Story, The Musical Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  286. ^ a b Rohter, Larry (July 30, 2012). "'A Christmas Story, the Musical,' Gets Its Broadway Moment". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  287. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 14, 2013). "Motown The Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Motown The Musical Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  288. ^ a b Grimes, William (January 16, 2015). "As 'Motown' Nears Closing, the Hits and Dollars Keep Coming". ArtsBeat. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  289. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 15, 2015). "Finding Neverland – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Finding Neverland Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  290. ^ a b Manly, Lorne; Healy, Patrick (April 2, 2015). "After Turbulent Flight, 'Finding Neverland' Alights on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  291. ^ "9 Broadway theaters to gain disabled accessibility". Times Union. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  292. ^ "9 Broadway theaters to gain disabled accessibility". Yahoo Finance. February 11, 2015. Retrieved December 30, 2021.
  293. ^ a b The Broadway League (October 21, 2016). "Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons On Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons On Broadway Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  294. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 2, 2016). "My Love Letter to Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Kristin Chenoweth: My Love Letter to Broadway Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  295. ^ a b Isherwood, Charles (November 4, 2016). "Review: Kristin Chenoweth, That Perky Performer With the Powerhouse Pipes". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  296. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 23, 2017). "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Charlie and the Chocolate Factory Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  297. ^ a b Chow, Andrew R. (November 15, 2017). "'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory' to Close on Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  298. ^ a b The Broadway League (April 23, 2018). "Summer – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Summer: The Donna Summer Musical Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  299. ^ a b Aridi, Sara (November 28, 2018). "'Summer: The Donna Summer Musical' to Close in December". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  300. ^ a b The Broadway League (November 7, 2019). "Tina – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Tina: The Tina Turner Musical Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  301. ^ a b Green, Jesse (November 8, 2019). "Review: The 'Tina' Musical Is One Inch Deep, Mountain High". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  302. ^ Paulson, Michael (March 12, 2020). "Broadway, Symbol of New York Resilience, Shuts Down Amid Virus Threat". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved October 22, 2021.
  303. ^ Franklin, Marc J. (October 9, 2021). "Go Inside the Broadway Return of Tina: The Tina Turner Musical". Playbill. Retrieved October 24, 2021.
  304. ^ Paulson, Michael (June 7, 2022). "'Dear Evan Hansen' and 'Tina' to End Their Broadway Runs". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  305. ^ Huston, Caitlin (June 7, 2022). "'Dear Evan Hansen' to Close on Broadway This Fall". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved June 9, 2022.
  306. ^ The Broadway League (October 3, 1910). "The Girl in the Train – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
    "The Girl in the Train Broadway @ Globe Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  307. ^ The Broadway League (August 24, 1911). "A Gentleman of Leisure – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
    "A Gentleman of Leisure Broadway @ Playhouse Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  308. ^ The Broadway League (May 26, 1913). "Mlle. Modiste – Broadway Musical – 1913 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
    "Mlle. Modiste Broadway @ Globe Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  309. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 24.
  310. ^ a b c Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 25.
  311. ^ The Broadway League (October 3, 1916). "Betty – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
    "Betty Broadway @ Globe Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  312. ^ The Broadway League (June 6, 1918). "Hitchy-Koo [1918] – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
    "Hitchy-Koo [1918] Broadway @ Globe Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  313. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 25–26.
  314. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, pp. 26–27.
  315. ^ The Broadway League (November 28, 1922). "The Bunch and Judy – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
    "The Bunch and Judy Broadway @ Globe Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  316. ^ Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 26.
  317. ^ a b c d Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 27.
  318. ^ The Broadway League (April 13, 1925). "Aren't We All? – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
    "Aren't We All? Broadway @ Globe Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 7, 2021.
  319. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 28.
  320. ^ The Broadway League (May 5, 1958). "The Visit – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Visit Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  321. ^ The Broadway League (October 11, 1958). "Goldilocks – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Goldilocks Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  322. ^ The Broadway League (February 16, 1959). "Les Ballets Africains – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Les Ballets Africains Broadway @ Martin Beck Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  323. ^ The Broadway League (November 11, 1963). "Arturo Ui – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Arturo Ui Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  324. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 29.
  325. ^ The Broadway League (September 25, 1963). "Luther – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Luther Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  326. ^ The Broadway League (September 11, 1964). "Wiener Blut – Broadway Musical – 1964 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Wiener Blut Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  327. ^ The Broadway League (October 27, 1964). "Ben Franklin in Paris – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Ben Franklin in Paris Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  328. ^ The Broadway League (November 23, 1964). "Bajour – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Bajour Broadway @ Sam S. Shubert Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  329. ^ The Broadway League (October 20, 1968). "Her First Roman – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Her First Roman Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  330. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 30.
  331. ^ The Broadway League (March 13, 1967). "You Know I Can't Hear You When the Water's Running – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "You Know I Can't Hear You When the Water's Running Broadway @ Ambassador Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  332. ^ The Broadway League (March 18, 1969). "Come Summer – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Come Summer Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  333. ^ The Broadway League (December 14, 1969). "La Strada – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "La Strada Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  334. ^ The Broadway League (March 29, 1970). "Look to the Lilies – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Look to the Lilies Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  335. ^ The Broadway League (November 19, 1972). "Ambassador – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Ambassador Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  336. ^ The Broadway League (October 17, 1972). "6 Rms Riv Vu – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "6 Rms Riv Vu Broadway @ Helen Hayes Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  337. ^ a b Bloom 2007, p. 155; Botto & Mitchell 2002, p. 40; Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  338. ^ The Broadway League (December 20, 1972). "The Sunshine Boys – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "The Sunshine Boys Broadway @ Broadhurst Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  339. ^ a b c d e f g Landmarks Preservation Commission 1987, p. 31.
  340. ^ The Broadway League (October 18, 1973). "Raisin – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Raisin Broadway @ 46th Street Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  341. ^ The Broadway League (March 25, 1976). "My Fair Lady – Broadway Musical – 1976 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "My Fair Lady Broadway @ St. James Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  342. ^ The Broadway League (May 16, 1977). "Primitive Mysteries – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  343. ^ The Broadway League (March 31, 1977). "The T – Broadway Play – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  344. ^ The Broadway League (December 21, 1978). "A Broadway Musical – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "A Broadway Musical Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  345. ^ The Broadway League (May 31, 1977). "Beatlemania – Broadway Musical – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Beatlemania Broadway @ Winter Garden Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  346. ^ Bloom 2007, p. 155.
  347. ^ The Broadway League (March 31, 1996). "A Midsummer Night's Dream – Broadway Play – 1996 Revival". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "A Midsummer Night's Dream Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  348. ^ Paulson, Michael (July 25, 2016). "The Real Jersey Boys Are Coming Back to Broadway". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  349. ^ The Broadway League (May 2, 2019). "Morrissey – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Morrissey Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  350. ^ a b Soloski, Alexis (July 3, 2019). "Review: Criss Angel Goes Broadway, and the Blood and Spiders Follow". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  351. ^ The Broadway League (May 28, 2019). "Pure Yanni – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Pure Yanni Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  352. ^ "Yanni Begins Concert Run at Broadway's Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Broadway.com. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  353. ^ The Broadway League (June 17, 2019). "Mel Brooks on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Mel Brooks on Broadway Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  354. ^ "Mel Brooks Begins Two-Night Comedy Engagement on Broadway". Broadway.com. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  355. ^ The Broadway League (June 20, 2019). "Regina Spektor: Live On Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Regina Spektor: Live on Broadway Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  356. ^ Wolper, Caitlin (July 2, 2019). "How Regina Spektor's Broadway Residence Redefines The Concert Experience". MTV News. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  357. ^ The Broadway League (July 2, 2019). "Criss Angel Raw - The Mindfreak Unplugged – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Criss Angel Raw — The Mindfreak Unplugged Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  358. ^ The Broadway League (July 9, 2019). "Dave Chappelle on Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Manilow Broadway Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  359. ^ Zinoman, Jason (July 10, 2019). "Dave Chappelle on Broadway: The Joke Is Getting Old". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  360. ^ The Broadway League (July 26, 2019). "Manilow Broadway – Broadway Special – Original". IBDB. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
    "Manilow Broadway Broadway @ Lunt-Fontanne Theatre". Playbill. Retrieved December 6, 2021.
  361. ^ Tannenbaum, Rob (August 5, 2019). "Barry Manilow Just Wanted to Write the Songs. He's Still Singing Them". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved December 6, 2021.

Sources[edit]

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