Talk:Oracle Corporation

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Citication needed on June 1979[edit]

" The company decides to name the first version of its flagship product "version 2" rather than "version 1" because it believes customers might hesitate to buy the initial release of its product.[citation needed]" This is stated in reference 8 on page xxx. This page is viewable in the book preview on amazon.com http://www.amazon.com/Oracle9i-Performance-Tuning-Techniques-Osborne/dp/0072224738 141.58.45.41 (talk) 16:38, 18 June 2013 (UTC)

Slogans[edit]

There is a "citation needed" link in the slogan "Unbreakable". I found this document which describes the slogan and appears to be witten by Oracle itself. Shall we incorporate it? http://www.cgisecurity.com/database/oracle/pdf/unbreak3.pdf

Some input[edit]

Think.com is actually one program run by Oracle Education Foundation, together with another purchased program called ThinkQuest. These programs are purely non-profit, charitable ones for students from 7 to 16 year old.--Junqing.wang 07:39, 9 August 2006 (UTC)Junqing.Wang

Too much detail?[edit]

Someone needs to go through that history timeline and get rid of all the little stuff that is not of interest to the average reader. It's almost as if every former employee tried to get a shout out to the product they worked on. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 209.148.113.31 (talkcontribs) 08:48, May 12, 2005 (UTC)

Too much arcane detail in this article: readers interested in Oracle don't need to know every building address, for example. —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 209.148.113.31 (talkcontribs) 09:21, May 12, 2005 (UTC)

FWIW, the source for most of the information in the history section was the November/December 2001 issue of Oracle Magazine [2]. Since this information originally appeared in an Oracle owned publication, the history does tend to put a slightly glossy marketing spin on the past. Edits are most welcome... the primary reason I fleshed out this section was that it previously consisted of only two entries: one for the year Oracle was founded and one for the year Oracle bought PeopleSoft. I'm probably not the right person to make subjective edits to this section, since I have a vested interest... BrianDuff 08:10, 27 May 2005 (UTC)
Removing the section of the timeline for RDBMS releases, which is not informative and of little interest to the average reader. The significant events already appear on the more generalized tech timeline. Crysb (talk) 18:14, 6 October 2010 (UTC)
They might be interested, but if the information isn't here, then they'll never know. Nohat 07:34, 13 May 2005 (UTC)
Well, heck, lets include the menus in the cafeterias then. When does the detail stop? Please folks, keep the cocntent relevent. Just because you know some arcane fact doesn't mean it belongs in the encyclopedia entry. And just because I'm anon, doesn't mean I'm a vandal.- anon —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 209.148.114.16 (talkcontribs) 06:20, May 16, 2005 (UTC)
I agree, this is perhaps not the right place for so much detail. I can add details of the menus in the restaurants if you want though :) BrianDuff 08:10, 27 May 2005 (UTC)
I like detail; those who don't can use the article's heading structure to bypass it. When I found out about the 2005 publication of the password hashing algorithm I felt it was a useful addition because, as a DBA at that time, I had no idea why Oracle suddenly started giving so much security advice. Salting the marketing hype with a few reality checks about Oracle's corporate foibles will help customers develop a healthy skepticism about Oracle more quickly. --Deangup (talk) 22:58, 10 June 2010 (UTC)
What about Retek ? —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 200.96.104.228 (talkcontribs) 01:52, November 1, 2005 (UTC)

origin of Oracle name/CIA project[edit]

"March 1983: RSI rewrites Oracle in C for portability [...] The word Oracle was the name of an unfinished consulting project for the CIA where the CIA wanted to use this new SQL language that Dr. Edgar F. Codd of IBM had written a white paper about."

I don't know enough to make the edit myself, but this is poor organization. The information in the last sentence should go either in the first timeline entry that mentions the Oracle database ("version 2"), in a separate timeline entry for the CIA project, or in the body of the article.Tennin 20:49, 11 March 2006 (UTC)

The actual Oracle project was started at AMPEX corporation in Redwood City, CA. The project was to manage the data base of the LA Sheriff's department criminal files. The project name was ORACLE which stood for Optimum Record Automation for Criminal Law Enforcement. The project was cancelled after much of the development was completed. Larry Ellison, Bob Miner, and Ed Oates asked AMPEX if they could take the code and the name to start a new company. — Preceding unsigned comment added by 216.75.233.42 (talk) 01:17, 27 March 2014 (UTC)

I'm astonished this critical information is not contained in the article. http://www.businessinsider.com/the-cia-made-larry-ellison-a-billionaire-2014-9 95.105.222.164 (talk) 00:16, 13 January 2017 (UTC)

"Database-Symbol-Style"?[edit]

The caption for the image of Oracle HQ uses the term "Database-Symbol-Style". I could find nowhere on the web that mentions "Database-Symbol-Style" except this page, and its syndications.

What does this mean? Lewisham 21:04, 16 October 2006 (UTC)

When representing a database diagrammatically (e.g. as part of a system), a circular cylinder is commonly used.--Michig 08:20, 17 October 2006 (UTC)

My changes 3rd, 10th March 2007[edit]

On 7 March 2007 10:01 UTC, Ghepeu made a change which reverted my two changes of 3 March. My changes are here at lines 284 and 290: http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Oracle_Corporation&diff=113283447&oldid=112946127. I think Ghepeu's reversion of my changes was inadvertent. Isidore 13:07, 10 March 2007 (UTC)

List of Oracle acquisitions[edit]

I have created List_of_Oracle_acquisitions Page. Need help to move list of Oracle Acquisitions to that page. Main page should be used for highlights, Major acquisitions. Chirag 21:07, 22 May 2007 (UTC)

Why doesn't this article link to the list of acquisitions by Oracle and remove similar list from here) List of acquisitions by Oracle —Preceding unsigned comment added by 94.125.16.11 (talk) 18:29, 11 February 2009 (UTC)

The table here should really be replaced by the table in List of acquisitions by Oracle. Before that's possible however the future replacement needs to provide at least as good functionality and be as complete as the source. I just got the valuation sorting working correctly there now, but there's still plenty left to be done, i.e. date sorting and completeness check--Berny68 (talk) 09:30, 17 April 2010 (UTC)
As far as I can see, the List of acquisitions by Oracle looks as complete as the one that appears here. I think it could be taken out of this page to improve the readability of the main article. Crysb (talk) 12:27, 22 September 2010 (UTC)

Oracle 10g Release Dates[edit]

The "History" section has 2004 as the release date for Oracle 10g, while the "RDBMS release timeline" states 2003 - they can't both be right :-) —The preceding unsigned comment was added by 192.171.170.128 (talkcontribs) 15:15, June 12, 2007 (UTC)

Oracle 11g Page?[edit]

Is anyone out there working on an individual article for Oracle's 11g system? --Amaraiel (talk) 04:02, 17 February 2009 (UTC)

Not 2nd Largest.[edit]

I remove "Subsequently[when?] it became larger than IBM after its acquisition of Hyperion and BEA." Ranked by software revenue, which was implied by the previous statement, Oracle is still 3rd according to CNet.Esoteric Rogue (talk) 21:25, 7 July 2009 (UTC)

Avoid repeating of "Oracle" in section headings[edit]

The sections should not repeat the article title. "Oracle Fusion Middleware" should be "Fusion Middleware", "Oracle acquisitions" should be "Acquisitions" etc. -Pgan002 (talk) 01:02, 16 July 2009 (UTC)

Add Breaking news - Justice Dept sues Oracle[edit]

The article needs this recent news: Justice Dept. Sues Oracle for Fraudhttp://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703578104575397573983263294.html —Preceding unsigned comment added by Anneaholaward (talkcontribs) 03:32, 30 July 2010 (UTC)

Law Suits[edit]

Oracle has decided to sue Google for using there software which is under the GNU General Public License Use. This law suit is another flawed one. —Preceding unsigned comment added by Infoguy4353 (talkcontribs) 05:14, 14 August 2010 (UTC)

Neutrality[edit]

Given the recent news the neutrality has gone down hill on this article, I suggest either adding a criticism article for Oracle and semi-protect the article, or flag this article for not being neutral. 173.81.25.50 (talk) 01:01, 20 August 2010 (UTC)

I think these new is very neutral. They exactly represent Oracle’s policy and attitude change after acquisition of Sun Microsystem. They form an integral part on the identity of Oracle and is important source of information for people to understand this company. —Preceding unsigned comment added by 155.69.163.247 (talk) 11:06, 12 January 2011 (UTC)

Add "Hardware"[edit]

Because Oracle now sells both hardware and software,* I recommend updating the first sentence so that it is an accurate description of the company. For example, you could revise it as follows:

Oracle Corporation is an American multinational computer technology corporation that specializes in developing and marketing hardware systems and enterprise software products--particularly database management systems.

[*Source: United States Securities and Exchange Commission Form 10-K, fiscal year ending May 31, 2010] —Preceding unsigned comment added by Shujuku (talkcontribs) 20:26, 22 October 2010 (UTC)

Oracle Mix[edit]

The article lacks a mention of Oracle Mix: cp Cook, Niall (2008). Enterprise 2.0: how social software will change the future of work. Gower Publishing, Ltd. p. 70. ISBN 9780566088001. Retrieved 2010-11-16. [...] Oracle now has an external version of IdeaFactory called Oracle Mix [...] for its customers to share ideas with each other and the company [...]  -- Pedant17 (talk) 22:08, 15 November 2010 (UTC)

Network Computers, NC Inc and Liberate[edit]

This article seems to be lacking some detail regarding this, IMO. There are some old Liberate docs at the wayback machine. --Trevj (talk) 15:01, 16 May 2011 (UTC)

Awards[edit]

What are your thoughts about creating a section for awards? They seem to put on a few quite prominent awards - Oracle World Retail Awards [3], Oracle Excellence Awards [4] M0z (talk) 05:22, 20 October 2011 (UTC)

You have to be careful and provide truly independent references about the awards, to be sure they are not just business promotion. I would agree that Oracle World Retail Awards is of independent value and importance, since it is sponsored by Oracle, but awarded elsewhere. As for Oracle Excellence, I may have reservations.
A rule of thumb: an important award deserves a separate article. Awards rerlated to Oracle business may be briefly described in a section (or even an article, say, "Oracle business culture", if one may write much on the subject).
I would advise to look into articles for other big guns, such as IBM, Microsoft, etc., and see what is written there on the issue of awards, if any. Last Lost (talk) 01:35, 21 October 2011 (UTC)

Does It Exist?[edit]

I failed to contact the corporation through its official site, by e-mail, by phone - support just doesn't work - and a letter returned back by post. It seems that the corporation does not exist anymore. Or somebody could give actual contacts? 79.98.92.109 (talk) 18:02, 25 February 2012 (UTC)

They exist. Their website lists their mailing address and phone numbers. There is nothing more we can do, if the company is not communicating with you, for whatever reason. we are not a support desk or ombudsman service.(mercurywoodrose)75.61.140.126 (talk) 02:28, 5 May 2012 (UTC)

" Oracle banned from bidding for US General Services Administration business" -- needs review[edit]

Greetings from COI-land: the section titled "Oracle banned from bidding for US General Services Administration business" seems to be way off.

Two articles that appear to cover the bulk of the story:

The basic fact appears to be that Oracle's schedule 70 contract was canceled. That would not appear to preclude Oracle doing business with the government, as the second article points out:

"...a consensus of experts has emerged to say that the cancellation is not a major obstacle, neither for the company nor for agencies that used the contract to buy Oracle services.
"Since GSA isn’t suggesting suspension or debarment, and because GSA is openly referring to Oracle’s other reseller and partner channels to sell its offerings, actions leading to the cancellation are probably not egregious"

(emphasis mine)

So it would seem to be a stretch for this section to flatly state that "Oracle will thus lose xyz a year in revenue."

Needless to say, it would be a real stretch for the value of xyz to be "around three hundred billion dollars a year" as the article currently has it.

(I'm an Oracle employee, but not involved in any way with government purchasing, and am not speaking as a representative of Oracle.)--NapoliRoma (talk) 21:55, 23 April 2013 (UTC)

Aquiring of Express Server and related applications from IRI in 1995 and further developments[edit]

- Sources wanted for aquiring facts from IRI in 1995. - Express Server and related apps was in top 3 at OLAP-Market in the 90's and 00 and the major competitor of Hyperion Essbase. OLAP-Report as Source wanted. - OLAP-Option became successor of Express Server. In Fact OLAP-Option is the further developed Express Server embedded at ORACLE Database System. Other sources than http://www.orafaq.com/wiki/Express? The contents there is correct, but without sources.

Social media links in external links[edit]

I have twice removed these, and explained in edit summaries, and on the talk page of Bryancyriel, that WP:ELNO point #10, and Wikipedia:ELNO#Official_links which explains that "Normally, only one official link is included" and "Wikipedia does not attempt to document or provide links to every part of the subject's web presence or provide readers with a handy list of all social networking sites" indicate that these are neither necessary, nor desirable. The link to the official website is sufficient.

I won't remove them again (I'm old-fashioned about revert warring), so I'll just leave this note here to let other article editors decide what to do. Thanks. Begoontalk 14:41, 30 August 2014 (UTC)

External links modified[edit]

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External links modified[edit]

Hello fellow Wikipedians,

I have just added archive links to one external link on Oracle Corporation. Please take a moment to review my edit. If necessary, add {{cbignore}} after the link to keep me from modifying it. Alternatively, you can add {{nobots|deny=InternetArchiveBot}} to keep me off the page altogether. I made the following changes:

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Dear Fellow Wikipedians, I know it as to be 50-100 be an owned entity or subsidiary/division, i also think controlling-founders/families, major shareholder(s) should not be ruled out.

Thanks. BBM-Blood — Preceding unsigned comment added by BBMatBlood (talkcontribs) 13:50, 22 June 2016 (UTC)

Timeline[edit]

This is mostly unsourced, full of trivia. Great content for a company website. Terrible WP content.

Overall timeline
Oracle Linux – A free Linux distribution supported by Oracle since 2006
1970s
  • June 16, 1977: Software Development Laboratories (SDL) is incorporated in Santa Clara, California[1] by Larry Ellison, Bob Miner and Ed Oates.
  • 1978: Oracle Version 1, written in assembly language, runs on PDP-11 under RSX-11, in 128 kB of memory. Implementation separates Oracle code from user code. Oracle V1 is never officially released.[2] The name Oracle comes from the code name of a CIA project which the founders had all worked on while at the Ampex Corporation.
  • June 1979: SDL is renamed to Relational Software Inc. (RSI)[3] and relocated to Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California. Oracle 2, the first version of the Oracle database software, as purchased by Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, runs on PDP-11 hardware. The company decides to name the first version of its flagship product "version 2" rather than "version 1" because it believes customers might hesitate to buy the initial release of its product.[citation needed]
  • October 1979: RSI actively promotes Oracle on the VAX platform (the software runs on the VAX in PDP-11 emulator mode).
1980s
  • 1981: Umang Gupta joins RSI, where he writes the first business plan for the company and serves as Vice President and General Manager.
  • February 1981: RSI begins developing tools for the Oracle Database, including the Interactive Application Facility (IAF), a predecessor to Oracle*Forms.
  • 1982: RSI renames itself Oracle Systems Corporation in order to align itself more closely with its primary product.
  • March 1983: Oracle Database is rewritten in C for portability and Oracle version 3 is released.
  • April 1984: Oracle receives additional funding from Sequoia Capital.
  • October 1984: Oracle version 4 is released, introducing read consistency.
  • November 1984: Oracle database software is ported to the PC platform. The MS-DOS version (4.1.4) of Oracle runs in only 512 KB of memory. (Oracle for MSDOS version 5, released in 1986, runs in Protected Mode on 286 machines using a technique invented by Mike Roberts, among the first products to do so.)
  • April 1985: Oracle version 5 is released – one of the first RDBMSs to operate in client-server mode.
  • 1986: Oracle version 5.1 is released with support for distributed queries. Investigations into clustering begin.
  • March 12, 1986: Oracle goes public with a revenue of $55 million.
  • August 1987: Oracle found its Applications division, building business-management software closely integrated with its database software. Oracle acquires TCI for its project management software.
  • 1988: Oracle version 6 is released with support for row-level locking and hot backups. The developers embedded the PL/SQL procedural language engine into the database but made no provision to store program blocks such as procedures and triggers in the database – this capability came in version 7. Users could submit PL/SQL blocks for immediate execution in the server from an environment such as SQL*Plus, or via SQL statements embedded in a host program. Oracle included separate PL/SQL engines in various client tools (such as SQL*Forms and Reports).
  • 1989: Oracle moves its world headquarters to Redwood Shores, California. Revenues reach $584 million.
1990s
  • 1990: In the third quarter, Oracle reports its first ever loss;[4] it lays off hundreds of employees. Ellison hires Michael S. Fields as President of Oracle U.S.A., Jeffrey O. Henley as CFO and Raymond J. Lane as COO.
  • June 1992: Oracle 7 is released with performance enhancements, administrative utilities, application-development tools, security features, the ability to persist PL/SQL program units in the database as stored procedures and triggers, and support for declarative referential integrity.
  • 1993: Oracle releases its "Cooperative Development Environment" (CDE), which bundles Oracle Forms, Reports, Graphics, and Book.
  • 1994: Oracle acquires the database-product DEC Rdb (subsequently called Oracle Rdb) from Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC). Oracle Rdb operates only on the OpenVMS platform (also a former product of DEC).
  • June 1, 1995: Oracle Systems Corporation announces the merger of Oracle Corporation into Oracle Systems Corporation. This transaction eliminates the holding company structure and streamlines the operating company, Oracle Corporation, with the public holding company, Oracle Systems Corporation. As part of the merger, Oracle Systems Corporation is renamed Oracle Corporation and is the surviving entity incorporated as a Delaware corporation.
  • June 21, 1995: Oracle Corporation announces new data-warehousing facilities, including parallel queries, developed by Scott P. Hunter for an Equifax credit database benchmark using a Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) supercomputer made by Ellison owned nCube.
  • November 1995: Oracle becomes one of the first[citation needed] large software companies to announce an Internet strategy when Ellison introduces the Network Computer concept at an IDC conference in Paris.
  • 1996: Oracle releases Web Browser of the Oracle PowerBrowser.
  • April 1997: Oracle releases the first version of Discoverer.
  • June 1997: Oracle 8 is released with SQL object technology, Internet technology and support for terabytes of data.
  • September 1997: Oracle Corporation announces a commitment to the Java platform, and introduces Oracle's Java integrated development environment, subsequently called Oracle JDeveloper.
  • January 1998: Oracle releases Oracle Applications 10.7 Network Computing Architecture (NCA). All the applications in the business software now run across the web in a standard web browser.
  • May 1998: Oracle Corporation releases Oracle Applications 11.
  • April 1998: Oracle announces that it will integrate a Java Virtual Machine with Oracle Database.
  • September 1998: Oracle 8i is released (the i stands for Internet).
  • October 1998: Oracle 8 and Oracle Application Server 4.0 are released on the Linux platform.
  • May 1999: Oracle releases JDeveloper 2.0, showcasing Business Components for Java (BC4J), a set of libraries and development tools for building database-aware applications.
2000s
  • 2000: OracleMobile subsidiary is founded. Oracle 9i and Application Server is released. In May, Oracle announces the Internet File System (iFS), later re-branded as Oracle Content Management SDK.[5]
  • 2001: Ellison announces that Oracle saved $1 billion by implementing and using its own business applications.
  • 2004: Oracle 10g is released (the g stands for Grid).
  • December 13, 2004: After a long battle over the control of PeopleSoft, Oracle announces that it has signed an agreement to acquire PeopleSoft for $26.50 per share (approximately $10.3 billion).
  • January 14, 2005: Oracle Corporation announces that it will reduce its combined workforce to 50,000, a reduction of approximately 5,000 following the take-over of PeopleSoft.
  • September 2005: Oracle Corporation announces that it has agreed to acquire the private company Global Logistics Technologies, Inc., a global provider of logistics and transportation management software (TMS) solutions, through a cash offer.
  • September 12, 2005: Oracle Corporation announces its purchase of Siebel Systems, a producer of CRM technologies and a provider of business intelligence software, for $5.8 billion.
  • October 18, 2005: A serious security vulnerability in Oracle database password management is published by Joshua Wright of the Sans Institute and Carlos Cid of the University of London.[6] Oracle Corporation replies that existing safeguards and following good industry practices were sufficient defenses.[7] Oracle didn't close the underlying security hole until its release of the 11g DBMS in 2007.[8]
  • April 12, 2006: Oracle Corporation announces its acquisition of Portal Software, Inc. (OTC BB: PRSF.PK), a global provider of billing- and revenue-management solutions for the communications and media industry, at $4.90 per share, or approximately $220 million.
  • October 25, 2006: Oracle Corporation announces Unbreakable Linux.
  • November 2, 2006: Oracle Corporation announces that it has agreed to acquire Stellent, Inc. (NASDAQ: STEL), a global provider of enterprise content management (ECM) software solutions, through a cash tender offer for $13.50 per share, or approximately $440 million.
  • December 15, 2006: A majority of MetaSolv stockholders approves Oracle's acquisition of MetaSolv Software, a provider of operations support systems (OSS) software for the communications industry.
  • 2007: Oracle 11g is released.
  • March 1, 2007: Oracle announces an agreement to buy Hyperion Solutions Corporation (Nasdaq: HYSL), a global provider of performance-management software solutions, through a cash tender offer for $52.00 per share, or approximately $3.3 billion. The acquisition officially took place on July 1, 2007.
  • March 22, 2007: Oracle files a court case against a major competitor, SAP AG, in the Californian courts for malpractice and unfair competition.[9]
  • May 15, 2007: Oracle buys Agile Software Corporation[10]
  • October 16, 2007: Oracle confirms the impending departure of John Wookey, senior vice president for application development and head of its applications strategy, raising questions concerning the planned release and future of Oracle's Fusion Applications strategy.
  • January 16, 2008: Oracle announces it will buy BEA Systems for $19.375 per share in cash for a total of "$7.2 billion net of cash."[11]
  • September 24, 2008: Oracle announces it will market servers and storage in a co-developed and co-branded data warehouse appliance named the HP Oracle Database Machine.[12]
2010s
  • January 27, 2010: Oracle acquires Sun Microsystems and continues development of VirtualBox.
  • March 17, 2010: Oracle launches Enterprise Manager Ops Center, a platform for managing physical and virtual Sun environments.[13]
  • April 16, 2010: Oracle agrees to acquire Phase Forward for approximately $685 million.[14]
  • July 5, 2010: Mexico Development Center begins to operate with offices in Guadalajara, Jalisco, known as the Mexican Silicon Valley.[15]
  • July 29, 2010: Oracle is indicted for fraud by the US Department of Justice.[16]
  • November 23, 2010: Oracle wins $1.3 billion lawsuit against SAP – the largest software piracy judgment in history.[17] While acknowledging the wrongdoings of its unit TomorrowNow, which was accused of massive illegal downloads of Oracle software, SAP seeks reduction of the jury award.[18]
  • March 24, 2011: Oracle announced fiscal 2011 Q3 GAAP total revenues were up 37% to $8.8 billion, while non-GAAP total revenues were up 36% to $8.8 billion.[19]
  • October 2011: Oracle Corporation acquires RightNow Technologies Inc. for $1.5 billion, to strengthen cloud services.[20]
  • October 18, 2011, Oracle announced it has entered into an agreement to acquire Endeca. The transaction closed on December 5, 2011.[21]
  • February 9, 2012: Oracle announces acquisition of Taleo for $1.9 billion to add Talent Management products and services.[22][23]
  • 2012: In February 2012 Oracle releases Oracle WebCenter 11gR1 (11.1.1.6.0) incorporating WebCenter Sites—the new name for Fatwire Content Server.
  • May 23, 2012: Oracle announces the acquisition of social marketing platform Vitrue, for $300 million.[24]
  • June 5, 2012: Oracle announces the acquisition of Collective Intellect, a market intelligence firm.[25]
  • July 10, 2012: Oracle announces the acquisition of social marketer Involver.[26]
  • December 2012, Oracle Corporation acquired Eloqua, a marketing automation provider for $871M.[27]
  • January 31, 2013: Gartner, Inc. has named Oracle a Leader in its latest "Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Content Management.[28]
  • February 4, 2013: Oracle announces that it had agreed to buy Acme Packet.[29]
  • March 13, 2013, Nimbula was acquired by Oracle Corporation [30]
  • March 25, 2013: Oracle announces that it had agreed to buy Tekelec.[31]
  • May 2, 2013: Oracle enters an agreement with Paradox Engineering to work on new solutions in the smart city market.[32]
  • May 9, 2013: Oracle announces new in-memory applications for Oracle JD Edwards EnterpriseOne, Oracle PeopleSoft, Oracle Siebel, Oracle E-Business Suite, and Oracle Hyperion[33]
  • October 23, 2013: Oracle enters agreement to acquire BigMachines.[34]
  • December 20, 2013: Oracle acquired digital marketing company Responsys.[35]
  • October 2014: Oracle acquired MICROS Systems Inc.
  • December 22, 2014: Oracle acquired digital marketing company Datalogix for an undisclosed amount.[36]
  • January 28, 2016: Oracle announces that it is discontinuing its Java browser plugin.[37]

References

  1. ^ Oracle, FAQ; www.orafaq.com.
  2. ^ Oracle's 30th Anniversary, page 26. Retrieved November 23, 2012.
  3. ^ Cite error: The named reference niemiec was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  4. ^ "Oracle Posts Quarterly Loss". New York Times. September 26, 1990. Retrieved February 13, 2013. 
  5. ^ Oracle Content Management SDK
  6. ^ Oracle Password Hashing Algorithm Weaknesses and Vulnerability
  7. ^ "Oracle Responds to the Password Hashing Algorithm Paper". Eddie Awad's Blog. Retrieved April 17, 2015. 
  8. ^ Brian Carr et al, "Oracle 11g Security Enhancements," Oracle 11g New Features, Rampant Tech Press, North Carolina, 2008.
  9. ^ "Oracle Sues SAP". Oracle Corporation. Retrieved November 11, 2008. On March 22, 2007, Oracle filed a lawsuit in U.S. Federal District Court in the Northern District of California against SAP. Among the claims made against SAP are violations of the Federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and California Computer Data Access and Fraud Act, Unfair Competition, Intentional and Negligent Interference with Prospective Economic Advantage and Civil Conspiracy. 
  10. ^ "Oracle Buys Product Lifecycle Management Leader Agile". Oracle Corporation. Retrieved December 12, 2011. Oracle announced today that it has agreed to acquire Agile Software Corporation (Nasdaq: AGIL)... 
  11. ^ Oracle to Acquire BEA Systems Press release via prnewswire.com January 16, 2008
  12. ^ "Oracle Introduces The HP Oracle Database Machine: Delivering 10x Faster Performance Than Current Oracle Data Warehouses". Retrieved April 17, 2015. 
  13. ^ "Oracle launches Enterprise Manager Ops Center". Retrieved April 17, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Oracle Buys Phase Forward". Taume News. April 18, 2010. Retrieved April 19, 2010. 
  15. ^ "Oracle confirms offices in Jalisco". April 7, 2010. Retrieved January 27, 2011. 
  16. ^ Ben Worthen And Brent Kendall (July 30, 2010). "Justice Department Sues Oracle for Fraud". WSJ. Retrieved April 17, 2015. 
  17. ^ Alexia Tsotsis (November 23, 2010). "$1.3 billion Oracle-SAP Verdict Is Biggest Ever For Software Piracy". Techcrunch.com. Retrieved July 7, 2011. 
  18. ^ SAP to Seek Reduction of $1.3 billion Oracle Judgment, Bloomberg, February 3, 2011
  19. ^ marketwire.com. "Oracle Reports Q3 GAAP EPS Up 75% to 41 Cents; Non-GAAP EPS Up 40% to 54 Cents." March 24, 2011. Retrieved March 25, 2011.
  20. ^ "Oracle Buys RightNow for $1.5 Billion to Add Cloud Services". October 24, 2011. 
  21. ^ Corporation, Oracle. "Oracle and Endeca". Oracle website. Oracle Corporation. 
  22. ^ "Oracle Buys Taleo". February 9, 2012. 
  23. ^ "Oracle Buys Taleo Press Release". February 9, 2012. 
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-- 07:00, 24 June 2016 (UTC)

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